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[textualcriticism] 2 Peter 1:1 - Beza 1565 Greek with hmwn x 2

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  • schmuel
    Hi Folks, 2 Peter 1:1 (KJB - Pure Cambridge Edition) Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ, to them that have obtained like precious faith with
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 23, 2010
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      Hi Folks,

      2 Peter 1:1 (KJB - Pure Cambridge Edition)
      Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ,
      to them that have obtained like precious faith
      with us through the righteousness of God
      and our Saviour Jesus Christ:

      Researchers can see that the AV-1611 is a bit different in punctuation, with a comma after God.
      http://dewey.library.upenn.edu/sceti/printedbooksNew/index.cfm?TextID=kjbible&PagePosition=1477

      ===========================

      On this famous and controversial verse (think Granville Sharp and debates even today) the unusual Scrivener GNT text with the double our
      (hmwn kai swthroV hmwn) is, I understand, first given in printed editions in Beza 1565. (Note that this goes against the idea that Scrivener was particularly accurate in finding the Greek that matches the AV.). The same text is also in Beza 1598 (perhaps in all Beza editions) and the Elzivir editions, again perhaps all.  It is quite unclear what this has in manuscript or early church writer support, or whether it approached emendation city, or perhaps Beza was influenced by some Syriac texts (lots of conjectures possible). 

      There are a few versions that follow this TR
      double our literally in translation.  Will Kinney lists the French Sainte Bible (1759) John Worsley (1770), Weymouth (1912), Jay Green's KJV III (1993) and La Bible du Semeur (1999).  Also Etheridge from the Peshitta (1849) with Lord rather than God.  

      John Hurt is helpful.
      http://www.greeknewtestament.com/B61C001.htm#V1

      Scrivener 1894 Textus Receptus
      simwn petroV douloV kai apostoloV ihsou cristou toiV isotimon hmin lacousin pistin en dikaiosunh tou qeou hmwn kai swthroV hmwn ihsou cristou

      simwn petroV douloV kai apostoloV ihsou cristou toiV isotimon hmin lacousin pistin en dikaiosunh tou qeou hmwn kai swthroV hmwn ihsou cristou

      Any help on discerning the impetus for the Theodore Beza decision would be helpful.
      Also very neat would be the full translation of any related Beza annotation.

      The Latin of one Beza note is given by Lewis Campbell.

      Contemporary Review (1876)
      http://books.google.com/books?id=fZzQAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA485

      And in the Christopher Wordsworth book sort of defending Granville Sharp.

      Six letters to Granville Sharp (1802)
      Christopher Wordsworth
      http://books.google.com/books?id=gQULAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA11

      Although note that Wordsworth says that this annotation only applies directly to Titus 2:13.  So is there actually a Beza note that directly takes an "identity" approach to the verse 2 Peter 1:1 ?  As often indicated in the literature.  It would seem that the Beza double our text would be very difficult to take with an identity (or, looking ahead, a Granville Sharp Rule) style approach to the verse.  So we have a bit of dissonance in historical input and analysis to unravel, where the Beza text and purported interpretation clash, at least to a degree.

      More simply though, I am most interested in the theories of the origin of the Beza
      double our text.

      Shalom,
      Steven Avery
      Queens, NY
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