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Dan Wallace finds a lectionary

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  • Wieland Willker
    And needs some help in understanding what exactly it is: http://csntm.org/tcnotes/archive/NewLectionaryDiscovery The lectionary has standard readings that
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 2, 2010
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      And needs some help in understanding what exactly it is:

      http://csntm.org/tcnotes/archive/NewLectionaryDiscovery

      "The lectionary has standard readings that begin with Mark
      1.9, Luke 10.25, Luke 19.2, 2 Cor 6.16, Matt 10.1, 2 Cor
      6.16, Gal 2.16, Matt 15.21, Gal 5.22, etc. These are
      interwoven with each other. But so are certain non-biblical
      prayers whose incipit mentions "prayer" (ευχη). I do not
      know what to make of these."
      "I am especially curious about the non-biblical prayers
      interwoven within the lectionary proper."

      Best wishes
          Wieland
             <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical Commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • Heterodoxus
      Wieland, It s my understanding that non-biblical material is or was included in hymnals and lectionaries as resources for further reflection and prayer ;
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 2, 2010
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        Wieland,

        It's my understanding that non-biblical material is or was included in  hymnals and lectionaries as resources for "further reflection and prayer"; e.g., the Benedictine Daily Prayer book (Lit. Press).

        M. Wm. "Pat" Ferguson

         
        This volume can also function in a wider sense as a prayerbook providing hymns and biblical and non-biblical readings for .


        On Jun 2, 2010, at 1:46 PM, "Wieland Willker" <wie@...> wrote:

        And needs some help in understanding what exactly it is:

        http://csntm.org/tcnotes/archive/NewLectionaryDiscovery

        "The lectionary has standard readings that begin with Mark
        1.9, Luke 10.25, Luke 19.2, 2 Cor 6.16, Matt 10.1, 2 Cor
        6.16, Gal 2.16, Matt 15.21, Gal 5.22, etc. These are
        interwoven with each other. But so are certain non-biblical
        prayers whose incipit mentions "prayer" (ευχη). I do not
        know what to make of these."
        "I am especially curious about the non-biblical prayers
        interwoven within the lectionary proper."

        Best wishes
            Wieland
               <><
        ------------------------------------------------
        Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
        http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
        Textcritical Commentary:
        http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html





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      • Kevin P. Edgecomb
        We d have to see the actual text in order to determine specifically what sort of lectionary this is, of course, but it would bear comparison to the very
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 2, 2010
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          We'd have to see the actual text in order to determine specifically what sort of lectionary this is, of course, but it would bear comparison to the very similar early Armenian and Georgian lectionaries, especially. These included pericopes interspersed with the incipits of hymns and prayers, as well as location information for the celebrations, all based on the practice at Jerusalem. This could be a Greek exemplar of the Jerusalem lectionary tradition, which would be fascinating. Or it could very well be a more expansive standard Byzantine lectionary, but still important for the history of liturgics even aside from its text.

          I've presented translations of the ancient Armenian and Georgian lectionaries online for several years now:
          http://www.bombaxo.com/lectionaries.html

          See under the heading "Jerusalem Tradition Lectionaries".

          Regards,
          Kevin P. Edgecomb
          Berkeley, California
        • chris jordan
          In my experience it is not surprising to find non-biblical material in manuscripts that are designated as Gospel or Apostolos (or both) lectionaries in the
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 3, 2010
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            In my experience it is not surprising to find non-biblical material in manuscripts that are designated as Gospel or Apostolos (or both) lectionaries in the Liste. Lectionaries that contain prayers or hymns usually have the siglum Lit (Liturgical) in the Liste. For example, L476, the photos of which are on CSNTM, is a liturgical codex known as a Menaion, which contains a number of Gospel and Apostolos lections. This manuscript is labeled as L476+aLit in the Liste. I would call this manuscript a Menaion with Gospel and Apostolos lections as supposed to a Apostolos-Gospel lectionary. There are Gospel lectionaries with hymnal elements which I would refer to as Gospel lectionaries because among other things the biblical lections outnumber any other text found in the codex. For example, L162 (on the CSNTM website) has hymnal rubrics and L250 (Apostolos-Gospel lectionary) has hymnal rubrics along with the full text of selective Antiphones. However, these manuscripts do not contain the siglum Lit in the Liste. 

            I have previously come across Lectionaries with prayers e.g. L490 and L531, although I haven't recorded the content in great detail. These two have the siglum Lit in the Liste.  As noted by Dr W J Elliott in a private email the lectionary that Dan Wallace has found does not seem to have the lections in a typical order, which causes me to think that this is a select Apostolos-Gospel lectionary with prayers and would have had a Lit suffix if it was ever recorded in the Liste. 

            On the basis of the above types of lectionary manuscripts it seems that there was a desire to integrate the non-biblical liturgical texts (including prayers) with the biblical lections (and vice versa) for convenience due to the growing complexity of the Byzantine services.

            I am curious to see images of the codex and would be interested in finding out the proportion of prayers to biblical lections and what are the lection rubrics if there are any?

            Chris




            To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
            From: kevin@...
            Date: Wed, 2 Jun 2010 18:27:37 -0700
            Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Dan Wallace finds a lectionary

             
            We'd have to see the actual text in order to determine specifically what sort of lectionary this is, of course, but it would bear comparison to the very similar early Armenian and Georgian lectionaries, especially. These included pericopes interspersed with the incipits of hymns and prayers, as well as location information for the celebrations, all based on the practice at Jerusalem. This could be a Greek exemplar of the Jerusalem lectionary tradition, which would be fascinating. Or it could very well be a more expansive standard Byzantine lectionary, but still important for the history of liturgics even aside from its text.

            I've presented translations of the ancient Armenian and Georgian lectionaries online for several years now:
            http://www.bombaxo.com/lectionaries.html

            See under the heading "Jerusalem Tradition Lectionaries".

            Regards,
            Kevin P. Edgecomb
            Berkeley, California



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          • Daniel B. Wallace
            Unfortunately, the MS is at the National Library of Athens. We did not photograph the MS, only examined it briefly. It was a fluke: we expected a different MS
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 3, 2010
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              Unfortunately, the MS is at the National Library of Athens. We did not photograph the MS, only examined it briefly. It was a fluke: we expected a different MS to show up. I will be back in Athens in a year and will try to look at it again.

              Daniel B. Wallace, PhD
              Executive Director
              Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts
              www.csntm.org



              ----- Start Original Message -----
              Sent: Thu, 3 Jun 2010 17:26:45 +0000
              From: chris jordan <jordancrd@...>
              To: <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: RE: [textualcriticism] Dan Wallace finds a lectionary

              > In my experience it is not surprising to find non-biblical material in
              > manuscripts that are designated as Gospel or Apostolos (or both)
              > lectionaries in the Liste. Lectionaries that contain prayers or hymns
              > usually have the siglum Lit (Liturgical) in the Liste. For example, L476,
              > the photos of which are on CSNTM, is a liturgical codex known as a
              > Menaion, which contains a number of Gospel and Apostolos lections. This
              > manuscript is labeled as L476+aLit in the Liste. I would call this
              > manuscript a Menaion with Gospel and Apostolos lections as supposed to a
              > Apostolos-Gospel lectionary. There are Gospel lectionaries with hymnal
              > elements which I would refer to as Gospel lectionaries because among
              > other things the biblical lections outnumber any other text found in the
              > codex. For example, L162 (on the CSNTM website) has hymnal rubrics and
              > L250 (Apostolos-Gospel lectionary) has hymnal rubrics along with the full
              > text of selective Antiphones. However, these manuscripts do not contain
              > the siglum Lit in the Liste.
              > I have previously come across Lectionaries with prayers e.g. L490 and
              > L531, although I haven't recorded the content in great detail. These two
              > have the siglum Lit in the Liste. As noted by Dr W J Elliott in a
              > private email the lectionary that Dan Wallace has found does not seem to
              > have the lections in a typical order, which causes me to think that this
              > is a select Apostolos-Gospel lectionary with prayers and would have had a
              > Lit suffix if it was ever recorded in the Liste.
              > On the basis of the above types of lectionary manuscripts it seems that
              > there was a desire to integrate the non-biblical liturgical texts
              > (including prayers) with the biblical lections (and vice versa) for
              > convenience due to the growing complexity of the Byzantine services.
              > I am curious to see images of the codex and would be interested in
              > finding out the proportion of prayers to biblical lections and what are
              > the lection rubrics if there are any?
              > Chris
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
              > From: kevin@...
              > Date: Wed, 2 Jun 2010 18:27:37 -0700
              > Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Dan Wallace finds a lectionary
              >
              > We'd have to see the actual text in order to determine specifically what
              > sort of lectionary this is, of course, but it would bear comparison to
              > the very similar early Armenian and Georgian lectionaries, especially.
              > These included pericopes interspersed with the incipits of hymns and
              > prayers, as well as location information for the celebrations, all based
              > on the practice at Jerusalem. This could be a Greek exemplar of the
              > Jerusalem lectionary tradition, which would be fascinating. Or it could
              > very well be a more expansive standard Byzantine lectionary, but still
              > important for the history of liturgics even aside from its text.
              >
              > I've presented translations of the ancient Armenian and Georgian
              > lectionaries online for several years now:
              > http://www.bombaxo.com/lectionaries.html
              >
              > See under the heading "Jerusalem Tradition Lectionaries".
              >
              > Regards,
              > Kevin P. Edgecomb
              > Berkeley, California
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              > Get a new e-mail account with Hotmail – Free. Sign-up now.
              >
              >

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