Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Parker Library: Free Biblical MS Image-Viewing for N-Z

Expand Messages
  • james_snapp_jr
    Here s an index to the Biblical manuscripts accessible without a subscription at the Parker Library on the Web, for N-Z: 245 = New Testament in English.
    Message 1 of 7 , May 4, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Here's an index to the Biblical manuscripts accessible without a subscription at the Parker Library on the Web, for N-Z:

      245 = New Testament in English. Produced c. 1570. A handwritten NT with cross-references and notes in the margins. Is it based on some printed text, or is it a prototype of a printed text? Has an interesting combination of readings (no Mt. 6:13, has "in the prophets" in Mk. 1:2, has "Jesus" in Mk. 16:9; has Lk. 22:43-44, the PA is on 148r, Acts 8:37 is present, "God" in I Tim. 3:16, "shall burn" in II Pet. 3:10, First John 5:7 includes the Comma in the text in parentheses on 277v). On 89r Luke 1-4 is formatted as if it is a preface, with a colophon-verse about Mark after Luke 1:4, and a fresh book-title at the head of the next page. Some pages in Luke are smeared. Some notes by the colophons rhyme.

      434 = New Testament in Middle English. 1300's. Presented as "A Fourteenth Century English Biblical Version in 1904 by Miss A. Paues. Not nearly complete; has Epistles (General, then Paulline), Acts, and Mt. 1;1-6:12.

      197B = Northumbrian Gospels. Latin, 700's, incomplete. With Celtic images and style; nice eagle on 245. Only pages from John and Luke. (perhaps subscribers have access to 197A?)

      53 = Petersborough Psalter and Beastiary. Latin, 1300's. Beautifully rendered and illustrated, with some NT scenes. There are several smaller texts. The Bestiary begins on 189r. Dragon on 204v.

      468 = Psalter of Gregory of Huntingdon. Latin and Greek. 1200's. Has a table of rune-like numerals.

      628 = Psalter. Latin. C. 1240.

      278 = Psalter (Middle English and Anglo-Norman). Early 1300's.

      272 = Psalter of Count Achadeus. Latin, 800's. Caroline minuscule script. Very elaborate initial-page on 3v.

      411 = Psalter. Latin, 900's. Sheet-music on the opening pages. A few lections from the Gospels begin on 141r.

      147 = Wycliffite Bible (Later version). English, early 1400's.

      440 = Wycliffite Gospels. English, early 1400's.

      Remember that to see details on any page you have to use that "Basic View" button.

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.
    • James Miller
      ... Greek transliterated with Latin letters, to be precise. I was interested in this since I m writing something about the Psalter and would like to look at
      Message 2 of 7 , May 4, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        --- On Tue, 5/4/10, james_snapp_jr <voxverax@...> wrote:

        > 468 = Psalter of Gregory of Huntingdon.  Latin and
        > Greek.  1200's.  Has a table of rune-like
        > numerals. 

        Greek transliterated with Latin letters, to be precise. I was interested in this since I'm writing something about the Psalter and would like to look at some Greek Psalter manuscripts. Anyone have any leads on Greek Psalter manuscripts (preferably liturgical Psalters, i.e., those produced for use in communal worship) viewable on the web?

        And relavent to the site James has posted about: these are pretty low-quality images, even when zoomed (I write of the non-subscribed functionality of the site). Bringing up the slightly enlarged images didn't entail any significant delay on my connection. But it wasn't much more useful than the thumbnail images.

        This site, while seeming to offer some promise, turns out to provide yet another example of the ways in which non-affiliated scholars can be essentially shut out from using valuable resources (unless they happen to have a spare $3500.00 per year, or $10000.00 for lifetime access).

        James
      • james_snapp_jr
        James Miller, About the Psalter of Gregory of Huntingdon: yes; the Greek part is Greek transliterated with Latin characters, just as you said. There is at
        Message 3 of 7 , May 4, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          James Miller,

          About the Psalter of Gregory of Huntingdon: yes; the "Greek" part is Greek transliterated with Latin characters, just as you said. There is at least one Greek Psalter in the PLOTW list, MS #480.

          The PLOTW's non-subscription images are not as good as what you can find at, say, the Goodspeed Collection at the University of Chicago website, but they are not altogether useless for non-subscribers. I found that if there is any specific part of a page that you want to see up close, you can navigate to that page via the slider; then use the Basic View button to enlarge; then (after opening MS Word) use CTRL+Alt+PrintScreen; then paste the entire print-screen image into MS Word; then crop the image so that only the part you want remains; then increase the contrast (and/or brightness) a tad; then re-enlarge the image -- and then, if you haven't over-enlarged, you should have an adequately useful image. The next step is to set your printer to "Best" (and I think it helps a little to use 24-weight paper, though perhaps it is just a matter of brands), and print the image.

          I used the above method to print the "Dancing Paul" initial in the Dover Bible at the beginning of Philippians, and was satisfied with the result, a readable 3" x 6" picture. It's a little extra work. But it's /free/!

          Yours in Christ,

          James Snapp, Jr.
        • James Miller
          ... Thanks so much for pointing out this manuscript, James. This turns out to be just along the lines of what I was looking for. ... I used a slightly less
          Message 4 of 7 , May 5, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            --- On Tue, 5/4/10, james_snapp_jr <voxverax@...> wrote:

            > just as you said.  There is at least one Greek Psalter
            > in the PLOTW list, MS #480.

            Thanks so much for pointing out this manuscript, James. This turns out to be just along the lines of what I was looking for.

            > The PLOTW's non-subscription images are not as good as what
            > you can find at, say, the Goodspeed Collection at the
            > University of Chicago website, but they are not altogether
            > useless for non-subscribers.  I found that if there is
            > any specific part of a page that you want to see up close,
            > you can navigate to that page via the slider; then use the
            > Basic View button to enlarge; then (after opening MS Word)
            > use CTRL+Alt+PrintScreen; then paste the entire print-screen
            > image into MS Word; then crop the image so that only the
            > part you want remains; then increase the contrast (and/or
            > brightness) a tad; then re-enlarge the image -- and then, if
            > you haven't over-enlarged, you should have an adequately
            > useful image.  The next step is to set your printer to
            > "Best" (and I think it helps a little to use 24-weight
            > paper, though perhaps it is just a matter of brands), and
            > print the image. 
            >
            > I used the above method to print the "Dancing Paul" initial
            > in the Dover Bible at the beginning of Philippians, and was
            > satisfied with the result, a readable 3" x 6" picture. 
            > It's a little extra work.  But it's /free/! 

            I used a slightly less convoluted method to view some ms. pages (I wasn't aiming to print anything). In my browser (Firefox), you can right-click on any "zoomed" image and select "save as." This will allow you to save the image in the format in which it is displayed within the web page (jpeg). You can then use image-viewing software to open and further enlarge--though with corresponding distortion, since the resolution is quite low--the image. If I needed to do something like you've described I'd open it with image-editing software (I use GIMP), then enlarge, crop, and save the section I wanted to insert into a Word file. But, as with all computer tasks, there's more than one way to skin a cat.

            Larry Swain: I get the impression that recouping costs on this project will end up being like recouping costs on (insert your choice of toll road or toll bridge names here). In other words, the charges will remain in effect, and will increase in pace with inflation and the cost of living index long after the initial cost for the project has been recouped. I see no good reason why this and other such projects can't offer some sort of non-institutional subscription path for the non-affiliated scholar.

            /.02
            James
          • Larry Swain
            ... Larry Swain: I get the impression that recouping costs on this project will end up being like recouping costs on (insert your choice of toll road or toll
            Message 5 of 7 , May 5, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              James wrote:
              >>
              Larry Swain: I get the impression that recouping costs on this project will end up being like recouping costs on (insert your choice of toll road or toll bridge names here). In other words, the charges will remain in effect, and will increase in pace with inflation and the cost of living index long after the initial cost for the project has been recouped. I see no good reason why this and other such projects can't offer some sort of non-institutional subscription path for the non-affiliated scholar.<<


              Two issues here, James:
              First, as for the longevity of the fees, I doubt that. Unlike toll bridges etc, the number of users of PLOTW is extremely small, and the Parker at least isn't a money making institution. So given the limited community from which to recoup costs, it will likely take awhile to do so. We'll see what happens from there.

              Second, I too wish they had other avenues to access the materials. Not just for the independent, unaffiliated scholar, but there are also going to be a large number of scholars whose institutions for many reasons will not cough up the cash to subscribe or not subscribe long term. So those scholars too who would like to access the materials are also out of luck.

              When the project was first announced, these concerns were voiced and we were told that it would be looked into. Not very far, it seems.

              Larry Swain

              --
              _______________________________________________
              Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
              Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com
            • james_snapp_jr
              James Miller, I had a chance earlier today to do a little digging for Greek Psalters. Most of the online images of Psalters are of Latin Psalters. The
              Message 6 of 7 , May 5, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                James Miller,

                I had a chance earlier today to do a little digging for Greek Psalters. Most of the online images of Psalters are of Latin Psalters. The illustrated Luttrell Psalter, among them, is accessible at the British Library site as a "Turning the Pages" text.

                But the first interesting Greek Psalter I saw was a trilingual (Greek, Latin, and Arabic) MS, of which there is a sample-shot at

                http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/sacredtexts/tripsalter.html

                You might want to sift through the links at
                http://www.synaxis.info/psalter/2_greek/2_greek.html

                and check out

                http://www.abbamoses.com/psalter.html

                http://www.textmanuscripts.com/manuscript_description.php?id=2827&%20cat=Religion&

                .

                Btw, in a description of one of the MSS at PLOTW, I think I referred to "Luke 1-4" being formatted as a preface. That should have been "Luke 1:1-4."

                JM: "I used a slightly less convoluted method to view some ms. pages (I wasn't aiming to print anything). In my browser (Firefox), you can right-click on any "zoomed" image . . ."

                As long as it works! If you're just viewing onscreen, you can cebter the image and hit CTRL+"+" a few times, too.

                Yours in Christ,

                James Snapp, Jr.
              • Daniel Buck
                James Snapp wrote, in post # 5720,
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 31, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  James Snapp wrote, in post # 5720,

                  <<Here's an index to the Biblical manuscripts accessible without a subscription at the Parker Library on the Web:


                  245 = New Testament in English. Produced c. 1570. A handwritten NT with cross-references and notes in the margins. Is it based on some printed text, or is it a prototype of a printed text? Has an interesting combination of readings (no Mt. 6:13, has "in the prophets" in Mk. 1:2, has "Jesus" in Mk. 16:9; has Lk. 22:43-44, the PA is on 148r, Acts 8:37 is present, "God" in I Tim. 3:16, "shall burn" in II Pet. 3:10, First John 5:7 includes the Comma in the text in parentheses on 277v). On 89r Luke 1-4 is formatted as if it is a preface, with a colophon-verse about Mark after Luke 1:4, and a fresh book-title at the head of the next page. Some pages in Luke are smeared. Some notes by the colophons rhyme.>>

                  This ms is a good example of the fluidity of the Comma designation. Manuscripts and texts that include the Comma aren't in agreement as to just what it consists of. Parker 245 has parentheses as indicated (spelling standardized, actual Comma in italics):

                  7 (For there are three which bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.)  8 For there are three which bear record in earth, the Spirit, and water, and blood: and these three are one.

                  Although the spelling varies, the wording of this passage is identical to Tyndale's second and subsequent editions, 1534-35.  Coverdale and most subsequent translators reverted back to the For... And... wording of Tyndale's first edition, with other minor changes (Douay-Rheims has And . . . And).  But what changed from one edition to the other was the placement of the parentheses.  Tyndale 1526 had none; 1534 and 1535 had them from "For" to "one" (all of v. 7) and again around "in earth."  Coverdale, however, left out the second set of parentheses in his 1535 edition. No other printed edition since did likewise.

                  So, this ms contains a unique combination of Tyndale's wording, but Coverdale's placement of the parentheses. Unique in English Bibles, but how about Greek manuscripts? According to Daniel Wallace, the Comma as penned into the margin of 177 reads:

                  οτι τρεις εισιν οι μαρτυρουντες εν ουρανω: πατηρ, λογος, και πνευμα αγιον, και οι τρεις εις το εν εισιν
                  for there are three which bear record in heaven: Father, Word, and Holy Ghost, and these three are one.

                  Exactly the portion of the comma marked in the English manuscript.


                  Daniel Buck



                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.