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another Qumran inkwell

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  • Stephen Goranson
    A recent publication includes much of interest: J.-B. Humbert & J. Gunneweg ed., Khirbet Qumran et Ain Feshkha (volume 2), Etudes d anthropologie, de physique
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 29, 2004
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      A recent publication includes much of interest: J.-B. Humbert & J. Gunneweg
      ed., Khirbet Qumran et Ain Feshkha (volume 2), Etudes d'anthropologie, de
      physique et de chemie (NTOA.SA 3, 2003).

      For example, Jan Gunneweg and Marta Balla, in the course of a neutron
      activation analysis article, (p. 32): "The ninth one [i.e., inkwell],
      incomplete [the base remains] and only recently [e.g., not noted in S. Pfann's
      useful volume in this series] recognized as such, was analyzed (QUM 221) from
      the khirbeh, L. 129."

      Interesting enough on its own, but, in addition, it so happens that this
      volume includes a five-line inscription from that same locus 129 (ed. A.
      Lemaire, p. 360-1).

      This is not a review, as I haven't finished reading the book. But I can say
      that this volume contains much of interest, even if it is expensive (perhaps
      somewhat understandably so, given the illustrations), and even if parts of
      some chapters contradict parts of other chapters, suggesting caution here and
      there.

      The inscriptions include (p. 356) the "Elazar" one, inscribed on a bowl before
      firing, dating much discussed, though the bibliography curiously lacks
      reference to F.M. Cross.

      Qumran date pits C14 are presented (p. 198, 204) as first century CE.

      Table of Contents at
      http://ebaf.op.org/english

      More details if there's interest.
      best,
      Stephen Goranson
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