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Roman and Frankish

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  • bucksburg
    I ve been reading Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou s dissertation on the commentary of Andreas of Caesarea. I notice she quotes 12th century Archbishop Nerses of
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 22, 2010
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      I've been reading Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou's dissertation on the commentary of Andreas of Caesarea. I notice she quotes 12th century Archbishop Nerses of Lampron regarding "the monastaries of the Romans and Franks" in Antioch, in one of which he found "a commentary on Revelation in the Lombard language, in the same script which the Franks use." He was unable to read it (thus his identification of the specific language is suspect), but later found a copy of Andreas in the original Greek.

      I've come to the conclusion that the Syriac terms "Roman" and "Frank(ish)," paradoxically enough, refer to Byzantine Greek and Roman Latin, respectively. These terms were then used in other languages that were dependent on Syriac missionary efforts, such as Armenian and Arabic.

      Daniel Buck
    • Larry Swain
      Not Roman Latin, but Medieval Latin and perhaps nascent Italian and French.  But most likely Medieval Latin of some variety written in one of the Gothic
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 23, 2010
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        Not Roman Latin, but Medieval Latin and perhaps nascent Italian and French.  But most likely Medieval Latin of some variety written in one of the Gothic scripts.  By Romans he might mean the Byzantine Empire, but more likely (unable to tell without more context really) to my mind given the period, the Holy Roman Empire of which the Lombard League in the late 12th was both a part of and at the same time was resisting the Emperor's influence in northern Italy...between 1167 and 1225 though it was more cooperation in "international affairs" such as the crusades and related matters.  By Franks he undoubtedly means the French, who had been key players in the crusades and establishing Catholic monasteries in the East.

        Larry Swain
        Independent Scholar


         

        I've been reading Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou' s dissertation on the commentary of Andreas of Caesarea. I notice she quotes 12th century Archbishop Nerses of Lampron regarding "the monastaries of the Romans and Franks" in Antioch, in one of which he found "a commentary on Revelation in the Lombard language, in the same script which the Franks use." He was unable to read it (thus his identification of the specific language is suspect), but later found a copy of Andreas in the original Greek.

        I've come to the conclusion that the Syriac terms "Roman" and "Frank(ish), " paradoxically enough, refer to Byzantine Greek and Roman Latin, respectively. These terms were then used in other languages that were dependent on Syriac missionary efforts, such as Armenian and Arabic.

        Daniel Buck


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      • TeunisV
        The monastaries of the Romans and Franks is conform the Byzantine terminology: Byzantines and Franks (=Roman Catholics). Compare with New Greek (Divry):
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 23, 2010
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          "The monastaries of the Romans and Franks" is conform the Byzantine terminology: Byzantines and Franks (=Roman Catholics).
          Compare with New Greek (Divry): rwmeikos = modern Greek; rwmhosunh = modern Greeks. Modern greeks as descendants of Byzantines! New Rome=Byzantium=Constatinopel became the centre of the Roman empire.
          Nicephorus Gregoras Byzantine history is published under the titel: R¯omaik¯es historias logoi LZ = Byzantinae historiae libri XXXVII
          Again Divry: fragkos = Frank, western European, Roman Catholic; fragkopappas = Roman Catholic priest.
          Germans, French, Italians, they all are Franks in the eyes of the Romaikos.

          Teunis van Lopik



          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Swain" <theswain@...> wrote:
          >
          > Not Roman Latin, but Medieval Latin and perhaps nascent Italian and
          > French.  But most likely Medieval Latin of some variety written in one of
          > the Gothic scripts.  By Romans he might mean the Byzantine Empire, but
          > more likely (unable to tell without more context really) to my mind given
          > the period, the Holy Roman Empire of which the Lombard League in the late
          > 12th was both a part of and at the same time was resisting the Emperor's
          > influence in northern Italy...between 1167 and 1225 though it was more
          > cooperation in "international affairs" such as the crusades and related
          > matters.  By Franks he undoubtedly means the French, who had been key
          > players in the crusades and establishing Catholic monasteries in the
          > East.
          >
          > Larry Swain
          > Independent Scholar
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          > I've been reading Eugenia Scarvelis Constantinou's dissertation on
          > the commentary of Andreas of Caesarea. I notice she quotes 12th
          > century Archbishop Nerses of Lampron regarding "the monastaries of
          > the Romans and Franks" in Antioch, in one of which he found "a
          > commentary on Revelation in the Lombard language, in the same script
          > which the Franks use." He was unable to read it (thus his
          > identification of the specific language is suspect), but later found
          > a copy of Andreas in the original Greek.
          >
          > I've come to the conclusion that the Syriac terms "Roman" and
          > "Frank(ish)," paradoxically enough, refer to Byzantine Greek and
          > Roman Latin, respectively. These terms were then used in other
          > languages that were dependent on Syriac missionary efforts, such as
          > Armenian and Arabic.
          >
          > Daniel Buck
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > _______________________________________________
          > Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
          > Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com
          >
          > Powered by Outblaze
          >
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