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Re: [textualcriticism] Jewish Scripture in 1st Century Rome

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  • George F Somsel
    This assumes that Paul was actually the author of the Pastorals, which is highly questionable.  More likely it was written by someone who desired to acquire a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 4, 2009
      This assumes that Paul was actually the author of the Pastorals, which is highly questionable.  More likely it was written by someone who desired to acquire a certain acceptance for his writing at a later date after Paul had achieved a standing within the Christian community.
       
      george
      gfsomsel


      … search for truth, hear truth,
      learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
      defend the truth till death.


      - Jan Hus
      _________



      From: Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...>
      To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 3, 2009 11:08:47 PM
      Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Jewish Scripture in 1st Century Rome


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ted Clore" <tedclore@yahoo. com>
      To: <textualcriticism@ yahoogroups. com>
      Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2009 6:35 PM
      Subject: [textualcriticism] Jewish Scripture in 1st Century Rome

      >I was wondering how available would the Jewish scriptures be available to
      >the Roman population in the 1st Century? The Apostle relies heavily on the
      >OT when he wrote his epistle to the Roman church. Which makes me think
      >that either there were copies available to the general public outside of
      >the synagogues, or the Roman Christians where involved with the Jewish
      >community in such a way that they had copies of the OT.
      >
      > So how available were the scriptures at this time and what text would they
      > have had?

      There appears to be an anachronism in your question. Diaspora Jews used the
      Greek OT but with less than 5% literacy, copies were probably held by the
      archesynegogoi. Paul of Tarsus as well as the hagiographers relied on the
      Greek OT since all were in the Diaspora. Greek was the literate language
      and Roman "Christians" were, at the time of the writing of Romans (around
      50-55 CE), primarily Jews. When Claudius expelled the Jews around 45 CE, it
      included the Christians. The "general public" was illiterate. Paul almost
      certainly owned a Greek Tanakh himself which would have been included among
      the "scrolls and parchments" he requested brought to him by Timothy.
      Sometime in the first quarter of the 2nd century Paul's epistolary was
      collected and appended to the Septuagint for use by Christians. An LXX
      would have been extremely expensive and wealthy families would have
      purchased them from scriptoria. Other copies would have been maintained in
      libraries such as the ones in Caesarea and Alexandria but the illiterate
      general population would have listened to the scriptures from lectors at
      church houses.

      Jack

      .


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