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Canon and Scripture

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  • Mitch Larramore
    Why do some writers make a distinction between documents that are canonical and documents that are scripture? What is the difference between a document that is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 7, 2009
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      Why do some writers make a distinction between documents that are canonical and documents that are scripture? What is the difference between a document that is scripture and one that is canonical? Some seem to insist that a book deemed 'canonical' has to appear in a WRITTEN list of sacred Christian texts.

      Peter said Paul's letters were 'scripture.' Could I not just call them 'canonical epistles'?

      Mitch Larramore
      Sugar Land, Texas
    • torahman6
      Mitch, There are two views on canon. First, some view canon as the selected works the early Church (3-4th century) voted on (i m simplifying here) and thus to
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 7, 2009
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        Mitch,

        There are two views on canon.

        First, some view canon as the selected works the early Church (3-4th century) voted on (i'm simplifying here) and thus to be considered Scripture.

        The second view, which I prefer, is that the canon essentially formed itself. Canon, more specifically is the "rule" that the 1st and 2nd century Christians found authoritative. This canon was formed when personal letters that were intended for certain geographic areas (e.g. Ephesians, Colossians) or to certain individuals (e.g. the pastorals, philemon) were collected into a single corpus. The original context was no longer the point, but the message within each writing now had application and authority for the entire Church. This is Scripture, writings found authoritative as a 'rule of faith' for early Christians. More specifically, the Christ event happened, the epistles commented on the Christ event, and the pseudo-Pauline writings are the capstone which seek to preserve the interpretation of the Pauline corpus on the Gospel event. At least that's how Childs sees it, and I would agree.

        In this regard, canonical and Scriptural are very closely related.

        Regards,

        Rob Kashow




        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Mitch Larramore <mitchlarramore@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Why do some writers make a distinction between documents that are canonical and documents that are scripture? What is the difference between a document that is scripture and one that is canonical? Some seem to insist that a book deemed 'canonical' has to appear in a WRITTEN list of sacred Christian texts.
        >
        > Peter said Paul's letters were 'scripture.' Could I not just call them 'canonical epistles'?
        >
        > Mitch Larramore
        > Sugar Land, Texas
        >
      • Kent Clarke
        Hi Mitch: There is an excellent and readable volume recently published by Craig D. Allert that very carefully discusses this very question (as well as other
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 8, 2009
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          Hi Mitch:

          There is an excellent and readable volume recently published by Craig D. Allert that very carefully discusses this very question (as well as other issues regarding canon formation and biblical authority etc). It is entitled "A High View of Scripture?" and is published by Baker 2007. Well worth the read!

          Kent

          Kent D. Clarke
          B.F. Westcott Professor of New Testament Textual
          Criticism, Greek Languages, and Hermeneutics
          Trinity Western University
          Seal Kap House
          Langley, BC
          V2Y 1Y1, Canada
          (604) 513-2121 (Ext. 3116)

          ________________________________________
          From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com [textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mitch Larramore [mitchlarramore@...]
          Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 9:37 AM
          To: Textual Criticism
          Subject: [textualcriticism] Canon and Scripture

          Why do some writers make a distinction between documents that are canonical and documents that are scripture? What is the difference between a document that is scripture and one that is canonical? Some seem to insist that a book deemed 'canonical' has to appear in a WRITTEN list of sacred Christian texts.

          Peter said Paul's letters were 'scripture.' Could I not just call them 'canonical epistles'?

          Mitch Larramore
          Sugar Land, Texas
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