Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Novum Testamentum Graece v. Greek New Testament: Latest impr.?

Expand Messages
  • tvanlopik
    From: http://www.uni-muenster.de/NTTextforschung/ .... Veröffentlichungen: Nestle-Aland, Novum Testamentum Graece Post Eberhard Nestle et Erwin Nestle
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 23 3:37 AM
      From: http://www.uni-muenster.de/NTTextforschung/ .... Veröffentlichungen:

      Nestle-Aland, Novum Testamentum Graece
      Post Eberhard Nestle et Erwin Nestle editione vicesima septima revisa communiter ediderunt Barbara et Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger. Apparatum criticum novis curis elaboraverunt Barbara et Kurt Aland una cum Instituto Studiorum Textus Novi Testamenti Monasterii Westphaliae. 27. rev. Aufl., Stuttgart 1993, 9. korr. Dr., Stuttgart 2006, ISBN 3-438-05100-1

      The Greek New Testament
      Ed. by Barbara Aland, Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, and Bruce M. Metzger in cooperation with the Institute for New Testament Textual Research, Münster/Westphalia, 4th rev. ed., Stuttgart 1993, 11th impr., Stuttgart 2006, ISBN 3-438-05110-9

      Teunis van Lopik,
      Leidschendam, The Netherlands

      --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "virtuoso07" <virtuoso07@...> wrote:
      >
      > Andrew,
      >
      > 1. The *texts* of both the UBS4 (Greek New Testament) and Nestle-Aland's Novum Testamentum Graece are exactly the same. The difference lies in their critical apparatuses. If you read the introductions to both of these texts, you will learn of their differences. The UBS GNT is intended for translators. Thus, the apparatus is there only in moderation. The UBS GNT has a unique way of "grading" variants based on "four levels of certainty" (A-D) where A is certain and D is uncertain. The apparatus primarily lists those variants which are considered to be the most important one, ones that may affect translation.
      >
      > Nestle-Aland 27 (NA27) on the other hand has an expanded textual apparatus. NA27 does not use the same variant grading system employed by the UBSGNT. Instead, they use an abundance of critical signs that direct the reader to the apparatus when a variant is present. Also, the intended audience is not so much translators as it is scholars and textual critics who are concerned with the more comprehensive manuscript tradition. I encourage my students to use this text over the other because, while it is a little more tedious and time consuming, learning about the fuller manuscript tradition is always helpful. (Moreover, the font and overall layout of NA27 is in my opinion a much more attractive text.)
      >
      > 2. The answer to this question is yes.
      >
      > These are surface answers and can be fleshed out with a lot of examples. But, no time on this end to do so. Thanks for the question.
      >
      > Brice Jones
      >
      > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <abernhar@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Here are some most basic questions related to how New Testament TC information is passed on from true specialists (like many of you on the list) to the rest of us (like me):
      > >
      > > 1. What are the primary differences between Novum Testamentum Graece and The Greek New Testament? What are there intended audiences (i.e., who should use which and why?
      > >
      > > 2. What are the latest editions and what years were these published? (Are we still at Novum Testamentum Graece, 27th rev. corr. ed. and Greek New Testament, 4th rev. ed.)?
      > >
      > > I'm reasonably sure I have a good idea about answers to these questions. However, since my area of focus is on extracanonical gospels not the New Testament proper, I figured I'd check with the group. As I've noted, there are some pretty learned contributors to this discussion list.
      > >
      > > In any case, I think answers to these questions would provide good basic info for everyone on the list (including primarily lurkers like me), and I'm hopeful I might open a can of worms here and get some different people's opinions about the merits (or lack thereof) of the different critical editions.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Andrew Bernhard
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.