Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

NT quotes of NT passages

Expand Messages
  • Eddie Mishoe
    (I am posting this question on TC and B-Greek since I think it is equally likely that someone on either list may have the answer I m looking for. Please accept
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 2, 2009
      (I am posting this question on TC and B-Greek since I think it is equally likely that someone on either list may have the answer I'm looking for. Please accept my apologies if this is not encouraged.)

      Does anyone have data on how many NT authors quote other NT passages, and a list of such? (As when Paul in 1 Tim 5:18 quotes what we now call Luke 10:7.)

      Eddie Mishoe
      Pastor
    • Jay Rogers
      We would have to include: For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you: that the Lord Jesus on the same night in which He was betrayed took
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 3, 2009

        We would have to include:

        For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you: that the Lord Jesus on the same night in which He was betrayed took bread; and when He had given thanks, He broke it and said, "Take, eat; this is My body which is broken for you; do this in remembrance of Me." In the same manner He also took the cup after supper, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in My blood. This do, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me" (1 Corinthians 11:23-25).

        Compare this with the language of the Gospel of Luke:

        And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, "This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me." Likewise He also took the cup after supper, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in My blood, which is shed for you (Luke 22:19,20).

        Then of course, it depends on what you mean by "quote."

        If you have string of five or more words or even an unusual word in a short phrase, most linguists will agree that this is probably from a common source. Idioms are excepted of course. I don't know if anyone has ever compared phrases from the NT with other passages throughout the entire NT to find similarities of statistical significance and to try to determine, as synoptic researchers, who copied what from whom.

        2 Peter and Jude would be an example of this.

        This brings up another interesting question.

        Can we cull from Paul's writings and the book of Acts (assuming it is a reliable account) the "Gospel" that was preached by Paul?

        Moreover, brethren, I declare to you the gospel which I preached to you, which also you received and in which you stand (1 Corinthians 15:1).

        The question we should ask is: "Which Gospel?"

        I would maintian that Acts 13 has Paul's "Gospel" in a summary of a longer sermon (or sermons) preached by the Apostles. Here we have a basic outline of what is contained in the written Gospels.

        A conjecture is often made that no written Gospel could have preceded the first of Paul's letters since Paul does not quote from the Gospels. Yet the accounts of Gospel preaching in Acts 13 shows a narrative that corresponds to the written Gospels. We read in Acts 13, the sermon of Paul in about 45 AD in Pisidian Antioch. This sermon includes a quotation of John the Baptist:

        "Who do you think I am? I am not He. But behold, there comes One after me, the sandals of whose feet I am not worthy to loose."

        The question becomes, "Where does this quotation come from if not a written Gospel?" Some might counter that this is an interpolation by the author who had previously recorded the same event in the Gospel of Luke. However, if we compare the language, we see one is not simply copied from the other.

        Now as the people were in expectation, and all reasoned in their hearts about John, whether he was the Christ or not, John answered, saying to all, "I indeed baptize you with water; but One mightier than I is coming, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to loose" (Luke 3:15,16).

        If Luke is simply interpolating here, then why didn't he simply copy more directly from what he had written before? However, if this is a true account of what Paul preached, it is then either a paraphrase of what Paul said, or it is Paul's Gospel that differs slightly from the language of the four Gospels. If this was an authentic sermon by Paul preached in 45 AD, then that indicates that a developed narrative of some type -- either written or oral -- had existed for several years.

        I question whether this must have been an oral tradition only at this early point. I have often wondered why it is assumed that there was an oral Gospel for 35 or more years before anyone bothered to write it down.


        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Mishoe <edmishoe@...> wrote:
        >
        > (I am posting this question on TC and B-Greek since I think it is equally likely that someone on either list may have the answer I'm looking for. Please accept my apologies if this is not encouraged.)
        >
        > Does anyone have data on how many NT authors quote other NT passages, and a list of such? (As when Paul in 1 Tim 5:18 quotes what we now call Luke 10:7.)
        >
        > Eddie Mishoe
        > Pastor
        >

        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Mishoe <edmishoe@...> wrote:
        >
        > (I am posting this question on TC and B-Greek since I think it is equally likely that someone on either list may have the answer I'm looking for. Please accept my apologies if this is not encouraged.)
        >
        > Does anyone have data on how many NT authors quote other NT passages, and a list of such? (As when Paul in 1 Tim 5:18 quotes what we now call Luke 10:7.)
        >
        > Eddie Mishoe
        > Pastor
        >

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.