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Re: [textualcriticism] Text of the NT in Contemporary Research, 2nd edition

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  • Peter M. Head
    Thanks Bart, I think this could be very helpful, although I do have an issue with the price of volumes in the Brill series NTTSD which compares rather less
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 18, 2009
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      Thanks Bart,

      I think this could be very helpful, although I do have an issue with
      the price of volumes in the Brill series NTTSD which compares rather
      less than favourably with the $40 charged by Eerdmans for the
      original volume. As an Eerdmans book students could buy it; as a
      Brill book no one will buy it except libraries (and some of them will
      hesitate about purchasing a second edition). So my first plea would
      be that you guys think carefully about the publisher and the
      potential purchaser.

      Assuming you are willing to expand the scope I would like to read
      additional chapters on the witnesses not covered in the first
      edition, but worth some treatment:

      The Greek New Testament on Ostraka
      The Greek New Testament in Inscriptions
      Other Greek Witnesses to the New Testament (Pickering; Porter etc.)

      I am not quite sure where it would fit, but I think Marcion would
      warrant a chapter.

      I am not sure that it would be easy to do but I think if it could be
      done well a chapter which discussed canon-formation in relation to NT
      TC could be helpful (done badly of course it could be helpless!).

      I wonder as well about either strengthening the palaeographical
      aspects of the first three chapters (only Parker has any at the
      moment); or commissioning a chapter on this sort of thing.

      I think as well that a chapter which involved some sort of
      interaction with Septuagint studies could be helpful (since in many
      cases we are talking about the same scribes).


      At 03:35 17/02/2009, Bart Ehrman wrote:
      >Dear T-C'ers,
      >
      > Some 15 years ago Michael Holmes and I conceived and then
      > produced the collection of essays, The Text of the New Testament in
      > Contemporary Research: Essays on the Status Quaestionis. Our idea
      > was to have authoritative essays on each of the major aspects of NT
      > textual criticism, written by an acknowledged expert in the field;
      > each essay was to give a history of research over the past 50 years
      > (back to roughly the end of WWII) and an up-to-date "state of the
      > question," along with all the significant biography. When the
      > volume was completed, we dedicated it to Professor Metzger in
      > celebration of his 80th birthday (we were his final two graduate students).
      >
      > What was then the state of the question has now become a bit
      > dated. A lot has happened in fifteen years! Arguably more than in
      > any comparable fifteen year period in the history of the
      > 300+-year-old discipline. And so we have decided to put out a new
      > edition. Some of the essays will be updated by their original
      > authors; others will be rewritten by fresh new blood in the field
      > (well, actually, the scholars through whom that blood is coursing);
      > some will be rewritten from scratch by someone new. In addition we
      > are planning on adding several new essays to the collection, which
      > deal with issues/themes that have come to the fore over the past
      > fifteen years of scholarship. We anticipate that the volume will
      > appear in the Brill series New Testament Tools, Studies and
      > Documents, which Eldon Epp and I edit (this is a combination of the
      > old Studies and Documents that Eerdmans used to publish, and that
      > Eldon edited, and the Brill series, New Testament Tools and
      > Studies, that Metzger originated and that he and I had been jointly
      > editing for a number of years, before his death).
      >
      > I'm writing this note to the list both to inform you that this
      > new edition is in the works and to ask users of the first edition
      > for any suggestions: things that should be changed, omitted, or
      > added (especially: are there significant aspects of the discipline,
      > or related topics, that are not covered but really need to be?).
      >
      > Any suggestions/comments, please send off list (unless there
      > are things that you think are of wider interest to members of the
      > list), either to me at
      > <blocked::mailto:behrman@...>behrman@... or to
      > Michael at <mailto:holmic@...>holmic@... Many thanks,
      >
      >-- Bart Ehrman
      >
      >Bart D. Ehrman
      >James A. Gray Professor
      >Department of Religious Studies
      >University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      >
      >
      >

      Peter M. Head, PhD
      Sir Kirby Laing Senior Lecturer in New Testament
      Tyndale House
      36 Selwyn Gardens
      Cambridge CB3 9BA
      01223 566601
    • Peter Gurry
      I would simply like to second Peter Head s comment about reconsidering the publisher. As a grad student with a particular interest in NT TC, I was able to get
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 19, 2009
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        I would simply like to second Peter Head's comment about reconsidering
        the publisher. As a grad student with a particular interest in NT TC,
        I was able to get my hands on the 1st ed. at a decent price. But if
        this second edition is published by Brill, I will almost certainly not
        be able to use it.
      • Dirk Jongkind
        Dear Bart, Mike, I would love to see a chapter dealing with the history (or historiography) of NT TC. There are nice studies out there about individual
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 23, 2009
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          Dear Bart, Mike,

          I would love to see a chapter dealing with the history (or historiography) of NT TC. There are nice studies out there about individual scholars and two that appeared within the last 15 years that readily come to mind are Jan Krans on Erasmus and Beza, and Seelig on Wettstein.

          regards,
          dirk


          -- 
          Dirk Jongkind, PhD
          Fellow and Tutor, St. Edmund's College
          Research Fellow in New Testament Text and Language
          Tyndale House
          36 Selwyn Gardens
          Cambridge, CB3 9BA		Phone:(UK) 01223 566603
          United Kingdom			Fax:  (UK) 01223 566608
          
          
        • Bill Warren
          A chapter with brief 1/2 page biographies of the major figures in NT TC would be a nice addition as well. paz, Bill Warren, Ph.D. Director of the Center for
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 24, 2009
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            A chapter with brief 1/2 page biographies of the major figures in NT TC would be a nice addition as well.  


            paz, 


            Bill Warren, Ph.D.

            Director of the Center for New Testament Textual Studies

            Landrum P. Leavell, II, Professor of New Testament and Greek

            New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary




            On Feb 16, 2009, at 9:35 PM, Bart Ehrman wrote:


            Dear T-C'ers,
             
                Some 15 years ago Michael Holmes and I conceived and then produced the collection of essays,The Text of the New Testament in Contemporary Research: Essays on the Status Quaestionis  Our idea was to have authoritative essays on each of the major aspects of NT textual criticism, written by an acknowledged expert in the field; each essay was to give a history of research over the past 50 years (back to roughly the end of WWII) and an up-to-date "state of the question," along with all the significant biography.  When the volume was completed, we dedicated it to Professor Metzger in celebration of his 80th birthday (we were his final two graduate students).
             
                What was then the state of the question has now become a bit dated.  A lot has happened in fifteen years!  Arguably more than in any comparable fifteen year period in the history of the 300+-year-old discipline.  And so we have decided to put out a new edition.  Some of the essays will be updated by their original authors; others will be rewritten by fresh new blood in the field (well, actually, the scholars through whom that blood is coursing); some will be rewritten from scratch by someone new.  In addition we are planning on adding several new essays to the collection, which deal with issues/themes that have come to the fore over the past fifteen years of scholarship.  We anticipate that the volume will appear in the Brill series New Testament Tools, Studies and Documents, which Eldon Epp and I edit (this is a combination of the old Studies and Documents that Eerdmans used to publish, and that Eldon edited, and the Brill series, New Testament Tools and Studies, that Metzger originated and that he and I had been jointly editing for a number of years, before his death).
             
                I'm writing this note to the list both to inform you that this new edition is in the works and to ask users of the first edition for any suggestions: things that should be changed, omitted, or added (especially: are there significant aspects of the discipline, or related topics, that are not covered butreally need to be?).
             
                Any suggestions/ comments, please send off list (unless there are things that you think are of wider interest to members of the list), either to me at behrman@email. unc.edu or to Michael atholmic@...   Many thanks,
             
            -- Bart Ehrman
             
            Bart D. Ehrman
            James A. Gray Professor
            Department of Religious Studies
            University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


            =
          • Daniel
            ... I realise that this probably isn t the book to put it in, but I thought I d throw it out here for other members of the list to respond to: In 1884 F. H. A.
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 25, 2009
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              --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Bart Ehrman" wrote:
              >> I'm writing this note to inform you that a new edition of Text of the NT in Contemporary Research is in the works and to ask users of the first edition for any suggestions: things that should be changed, omitted, or added (especially: are there significant aspects of the discipline, or related topics, that are not covered but really need to be?).<<

              I realise that this probably isn't the book to put it in, but I thought I'd throw it out here for other members of the list to respond to:

              In 1884 F. H. A. Scrivener did a full collation of the various texts of the King James Version and published the results in a book entitled The Authorised Version of the English Bible (1611): Its Subsequent Reprints And Modern Representatives.
              In 2005, David Norton updated Scrivener's work in the New Cambridge Paragraph Bible.

              Both books contain the introduction to the 1611 KJV entitled The Translators to the Reader, which is a goldmine of information on the state of Bible translation around the turn of the 17th century. Full of classical and patristic citations, it is unfortunately written in a combination of archaic English and Latin, with a sprinkling of Greek and a smattering of Hebrew.

              This document cries out for a full translation into modern English, but the scholarship required to do so is staggering. So the question is, did David Norton already do this sufficiently in his edition, or is it still waiting the skills of a scholar specializing in the translation of medieval texts?

              Daniel Buck
            • harold37s
              ... Good news, Daniel! The work has already been done and published by the American Bible Society: The Translators to the Readers: the original preface of the
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 26, 2009
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                Daniel Buck wrote:
                >
                > Both books contain the introduction to the 1611 KJV entitled The Translators to the Reader, which is a goldmine of information on the state of Bible translation around the turn of the 17th century. Full of classical and patristic citations, it is unfortunately written in a combination of archaic English and Latin, with a sprinkling of Greek and a smattering of Hebrew.
                >
                > This document cries out for a full translation into modern English, but the scholarship required to do so is staggering. So the question is, did David Norton already do this sufficiently in his edition, or is it still waiting the skills of a scholar specializing in the translation of medieval texts?
                >

                Good news, Daniel! The work has already been done and published by the American Bible Society:
                The Translators to the Readers: the original preface of the King James Version of 1611 Revisited, Erroll Rhodes and Liana Lupas, editors (1997).

                The book includes a facsimile of the 1611 preface, a "transcription," and a rendering in "modern form." The major academic contribution is found in the "transcription." Rhodes and Lupas have identified almost all of the classic and Patristic references given, providing full references and additional information in a generous supply of footnotes. Dr. Lupas is a classics scholar, especially Latin, and Dr. Rhodes is a NT textual criticism scholar. One example from the Modern Form which renders "calumniated" as "slandered" gives you an idea of the purpose of this section.

                Harold P. Scanlin
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