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Re: Revelation of Gabriel

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  • Wieland Willker
    I have collected some relevant info on the Textual Criticism form here (with images): http://tinyurl.com/5zubjf Best wishes Wieland
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 9, 2008
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      I have collected some relevant info on the Textual Criticism
      form here (with images):

      http://tinyurl.com/5zubjf


      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      mailto:wie@...
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical Commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • Jack Kilmon
      ... From: Wieland Willker To: Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2008 3:28 AM Subject: [textualcriticism] Re:
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 9, 2008
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Wieland Willker" <wie@...>
        To: <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, July 09, 2008 3:28 AM
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Revelation of Gabriel


        > The media hype was generated by Israel Knohl from the
        > Jerusalem University.
        >
        > He has an Haaretz article here:
        > http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=850657
        >
        > and gives a more sensational reading of the lines in
        > question.
        > He writes:
        >
        > "Line 80 begins with the phrase "Leshloshet yamin" ("In
        > three days"), followed by another word that the editors
        > could not read. Then comes the phrase "Ani Gavriel" ("I,
        > Gabriel"). I believe that this "illegible" word is actually
        > legible. It is the word "hayeh" (live), and that Gabriel the
        > Archangel is giving orders to someone: "Leshloshet yamin
        > hayeh" ("In three days, you shall live"). In other words, in
        > three days, you shall return to life (compare "bedamaiyikh
        > ha'ee" - translated as "in thy blood live" - in Ezekiel
        > 16:6). The word "haye" (live) is written here with alef.
        > Similar orthography appears in the Dead Sea Scrolls, for
        > example in the Isaiah scroll, where the word "yakeh" (30:31)
        > is written with an alef after the yod.
        > This is followed by traces of two more words. The letters
        > are not easy to make out, but the first word seems to begin
        > with a gimmel and vav. The next word is not clear either.
        > The letter lamed is quite legible, and the letter before it
        > seems to be an ayin. I believe the sentence can be
        > reconstructed as follows: "Leshloshet yamin hayeh, ani
        > Gavriel, gozer alekha" ("In three days, live, I, Gabriel,
        > command you"). The archangel is ordering someone to rise
        > from the dead within three days. To whom is he speaking?"
        >
        >
        > Best wishes
        > Wieland
        > <><


        It is important to note that my interpretation is based solely on the Hebrew
        transliteration that depicts a lacuna after the het but Prof. Knohl can
        actually see the inscription and examine that lacuna under a glass...and he
        is one of the best. I am but an amateur who needs convincing this
        inscription refers to a messiah.

        Regards

        Jack
      • Tommy Wasserman
        Dear list, in Bob Waltz Encyclopedia of New Testament Textual Criticism I noted a principle of internal criticism formulated by H. von Soden, that the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 9, 2008
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          Dear list,

          in Bob Waltz' Encyclopedia of New Testament Textual Criticism I noted a
          principle of internal criticism formulated by H. von Soden, that "the
          reading which does not match Matthew is best"
          (http://www.skypoint.com/members/waltzmn/CanonsOfCrit.html).

          However, there is no reference. I suppose it is stated somewhere in von
          Soden's Die Schriften des Neuen Testaments in ihrer ältesten
          erreichbaren Textgestalt hergestellt auf Grund ihrer Textgeschichte,
          but where? I am grateful if anyone can tell me.

          Tommy Wasserman
          Örebro Theological Seminary
        • Wieland Willker
          ... p. 1424 http://rosetta.reltech.org/cgi-bin/Ebind2html/TC/vonSodenSNT v1?seq=1437 Best wishes Wieland
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 9, 2008
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            > but where?

            p. 1424

            http://rosetta.reltech.org/cgi-bin/Ebind2html/TC/vonSodenSNT
            v1?seq=1437

            Best wishes
            Wieland
            <><
            ------------------------------------------------
            Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
            mailto:wie@...
            http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
            Textcritical Commentary:
            http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
          • George F Somsel
            I m not (at the moment) acquainted with that statement, but in _The History of Early Christian Literature:  The Writings of the New Testament_ he states, That
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 9, 2008
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              I'm not (at the moment) acquainted with that statement, but in _The History of Early Christian Literature:  The Writings of the New Testament_ he states,

               

              That he [scil Mark] has incorporated so few of the discourses of our Lord

              into his work is evidently due to the fact that he knew of the existence of

              St. Matthew's composition.

               

               

               

              george
              gfsomsel


              … search for truth, hear truth,
              learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
              defend the truth till death.


              - Jan Hus
              _________


              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Tommy Wasserman <tomwas@...>
              To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, July 9, 2008 1:53:39 PM
              Subject: [textualcriticism] Reference in von Soden

              Dear list,

              in Bob Waltz' Encyclopedia of New Testament Textual Criticism I noted a
              principle of internal criticism formulated by H. von Soden, that "the
              reading which does not match Matthew is best"
              (http://www.skypoint.com/members/waltzmn/CanonsOfCrit.html).

              However, there is no reference. I suppose it is stated somewhere in von
              Soden's Die Schriften des Neuen Testaments in ihrer ältesten
              erreichbaren Textgestalt hergestellt auf Grund ihrer Textgeschichte,
              but where? I am grateful if anyone can tell me.

              Tommy Wasserman
              Örebro Theological Seminary

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