Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Codex Sinaiticus Leipzig online

Expand Messages
  • Wieland Willker
    The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany are going online. You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming functionality first:
    Message 1 of 8 , May 8, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany
      are going online.

      You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
      functionality first:

      http://www.e-manuscripts.org/

      Nice!

      Thanks to Jim West for the note!

      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      mailto:wie@...
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical Commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • mydogregae01
      ... ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ I hope this is not the beginning of limiting access to images!! The little program -- Microsoft s
      Message 2 of 8 , May 11, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany
        > are going online.
        >
        > You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
        > functionality first:
        >
        > http://www.e-manuscripts.org/
        >
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

        I hope this is not the beginning of limiting access to images!! The
        little program -- Microsoft's "Silverlight" -- is designed by
        Microsoft to only run on newer Windows operating systems and certain
        browsers, as well as newer Apple systems. If you do not meet
        Microsoft's requirements, the site is BLOCKED!

        Poor folks in third world nations may not have these expensive and
        newer Microsoft systems, and will NOT be able to view the images.
        Folks who use older operating systems cannot view the images, and
        folks who use Linux cannot view them, and folks with other types of
        browsers (not on Microsofts list) cannot view the images (Netscape et al).

        I hope that future postings/websites will NOT allow Microsoft to act
        as a judge as to who can view Microsoft approved sites! Sites with
        simple JPG images work on all browsers, on all operating systems, and
        in all image editors. Why limit access??

        Why bring Microsoft into the equation?? They will control the scene
        eventually, they control the updates as well (they are automatic,
        leaving the user out of the picture). Microsoft seems useful at first,
        but it is a very greedy company, and they begin with a nice personna,
        but eventually they will control or entirely manipulate to their
        corporate advantage, it is only a matter of time. Microsoft's record
        is historically clear in this respect. Beware!

        Manuscript images should be accessible to all, I plead with you not to
        complicate access further with such needless software as SILVERLIGHT.
        NO extra bells and whistles are needed, you are in effect limiting
        access! I hope this keeps you folks in Leipzig awake at night! :-) I
        hope you correct your venture!

        sincerely,
        Mr. Gary S. Dykes
      • Jan Krans
        It could be nice, but I get a runtime error both with IE and FF (all Vista): RuntimeError-AG_E_RUNTIME_METHOD-2207 line 0 character 0 . The nasty thing is
        Message 3 of 8 , May 12, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          It could be nice, but I get a runtime error both with IE and FF (all Vista):
          "RuntimeError-AG_E_RUNTIME_METHOD-2207<br>line 0 character 0".
          The nasty thing is that I would not even know where to report the error, or whether it is my problem only.
          Greetings,
          Jan Krans

          Wieland Willker schreef:

          The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany
          are going online.

          You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
          functionality first:

          http://www.e- manuscripts. org/

          Nice!

          Thanks to Jim West for the note!

          Best wishes
          Wieland
          <><
          ------------ --------- --------- --------- ---------
          Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
          mailto:wie@uni-bremen. de
          http://www.uni- bremen.de/ ~wie
          Textcritical Commentary:
          http://www.uni- bremen.de/ ~wie/TCG/ index.html

        • Dirk Jongkind
          Absolutely stunning! Works great for me (XP running Firefox 2) Dirk Jan Krans wrote: It could be nice, but I get a runtime error both with IE and FF (all
          Message 4 of 8 , May 12, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Absolutely stunning! Works great for me (XP running Firefox 2)

            Dirk



            Jan Krans wrote:

            It could be nice, but I get a runtime error both with IE and FF (all Vista):
            "RuntimeError- AG_E_RUNTIME_ METHOD-2207<br>line 0 character 0".


            You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
            functionality first:

            http://www.e- manuscripts. org/

            Nice!


            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            -- 
            Dirk Jongkind, PhD
            Fellow and Tutor, St. Edmund's College
            John W. Laing Fellow, Tyndale House
            Tyndale House
            36 Selwyn Gardens
            Cambridge, CB3 9BA		Phone:(UK) 01223 566603
            United Kingdom			Fax:  (UK) 01223 566608
            
            
          • dwashbur@nyx.net
            ... I quite agree. Microsoft has no business exercising any kind of control over the textual criticism field. Everything is about control for them, and we
            Message 5 of 8 , May 12, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              On 11 May 2008 at 17:04, mydogregae01 wrote:

              > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany
              > > are going online.
              > >
              > > You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
              > > functionality first:
              > >
              > > http://www.e-manuscripts.org/
              > >
              > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
              >
              > I hope this is not the beginning of limiting access to images!! The
              > little program -- Microsoft's "Silverlight" -- is designed by
              > Microsoft to only run on newer Windows operating systems and certain
              > browsers, as well as newer Apple systems. If you do not meet
              > Microsoft's requirements, the site is BLOCKED!
              >
              > Poor folks in third world nations may not have these expensive and
              > newer Microsoft systems, and will NOT be able to view the images.
              > Folks who use older operating systems cannot view the images, and
              > folks who use Linux cannot view them, and folks with other types of
              > browsers (not on Microsofts list) cannot view the images (Netscape et al).
              >
              > I hope that future postings/websites will NOT allow Microsoft to act
              > as a judge as to who can view Microsoft approved sites! Sites with
              > simple JPG images work on all browsers, on all operating systems, and
              > in all image editors. Why limit access??
              >
              > Why bring Microsoft into the equation?? They will control the scene
              > eventually, they control the updates as well (they are automatic,
              > leaving the user out of the picture). Microsoft seems useful at first,
              > but it is a very greedy company, and they begin with a nice personna,
              > but eventually they will control or entirely manipulate to their
              > corporate advantage, it is only a matter of time. Microsoft's record
              > is historically clear in this respect. Beware!
              >
              > Manuscript images should be accessible to all, I plead with you not to
              > complicate access further with such needless software as SILVERLIGHT.
              > NO extra bells and whistles are needed, you are in effect limiting
              > access! I hope this keeps you folks in Leipzig awake at night! :-) I
              > hope you correct your venture!
              >
              > sincerely,
              > Mr. Gary S. Dykes

              I quite agree. Microsoft has no business exercising any kind of control over the textual
              criticism field. Everything is about control for them, and we would do well to keep them out
              of this kind of field and keep the information open to all without their interference.

              Dave Washburn
              "I'll hold the nail. And when I nod my head, you hit it with the hammer."
            • John McChesney-Young
              In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Wieland Willker ... While I agree with much of Mr. Dykes lament in response to this, I thought I would add
              Message 6 of 8 , May 12, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@...>
                had written:

                >> The parts of Codex Sinaiticus that are in Leipzig, Germany
                >> are going online.
                >>
                >> You have to install a little Microsoft tool for the zooming
                >> functionality first:
                >>
                >> http://www.e-manuscripts.org/

                While I agree with much of Mr. Dykes' lament in response to this, I
                thought I would add some comments.

                And at 5:04 PM +0000 5/11/08, mydogregae01 wrote in part:

                The
                >little program -- Microsoft's "Silverlight" -- is designed by
                >Microsoft to only run on newer Windows operating systems and certain
                >browsers, as well as newer Apple systems. If you do not meet
                >Microsoft's requirements, the site is BLOCKED!

                For the specific OS and browser requirements, see:

                http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/resources/install.aspx#sysreq

                >Folks who use older operating systems cannot view the images, and
                >folks who use Linux cannot view them, and folks with other types of
                >browsers (not on Microsofts list) cannot view the images (Netscape et al).

                However, Linux users are expected to be able to view Silverlight
                content sometime around the middle of this year via Moonlight:

                http://www.webware.com/8301-1_109-9829738-2.html?tag=bl
                <http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2007/09/moonlight-silverlight-for-linu.html>
                http://www.mono-project.com/Moonlight

                >I hope that future postings/websites will NOT allow Microsoft to act
                >as a judge as to who can view Microsoft approved sites! Sites with
                >simple JPG images work on all browsers, on all operating systems, and
                >in all image editors. Why limit access??

                Ars Technica has had a few articles about Silverlight, and this
                recent one on a presentation by the developer of Moonlight talks
                about some of its advantages over not only simple image presentations
                but even over Flash:

                <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080417-oss-silverlight-implementation-moonlight-shines-bright.html>

                >Why bring Microsoft into the equation??

                Another AT article on the decision to use Silverlight at the Library
                of Congress site:

                <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080411-library-of-congress-exhibit-shows-future-of-digital-archives.html>

                casts light on that particular case:

                "You're probably wondering why the LOC is using Silverlight instead
                of something more widely supported, like Adobe's Flash. The answer
                is, of course, money. As we reported back in February, Microsoft gave
                the LOC $3 million to put exhibits online using Silverlight..."

                The FOSS community in general is not fond of Silverlight. See e.g.:

                http://boycottnovell.com/2008/01/23/silverlight-not-for-linux/
                <http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roc/archives/2008/01/the_dark_side_o.html>

                and the response to the latter by Moonlight's developer:

                http://tirania.org/blog/archive/2008/Jan-04.html

                >Manuscript images should be accessible to all, I plead with you not to
                >complicate access further with such needless software as SILVERLIGHT.
                >NO extra bells and whistles are needed, you are in effect limiting
                >access!

                I agree that it's very unfortunate that those with systems unable to
                run Silverlight can't gain access to the images and I think it would
                have made sense for the custodians at Leipzig to have set up an
                alternative site with simple navigation linked to plain image files.

                Dirk Jongkind wrote in response to the original announcement:

                > Absolutely stunning! Works great for me (XP running Firefox 2)

                I was not able to install the Silverlight plug-in on my Mac OS 10.2
                machine; as the system requirements I linked to above show, the
                minimum on that platform is 10.4.8 (the current version of 10.4 is
                10.4.11; the most recent version of the OS is 10.5.2).

                I succeeded with my 10.4 machine, although with a minor glitch. My
                main browser is Firefox, and after a quick download and painless
                installation of the plug-in, I restarted the browser and discovered
                on trying the site again that I was offered the same "Download
                Silverlight" semi-error message I'd been getting before I installed
                it. I logged out of my account and logged in and tried it again
                without success. I thought to check the site with Safari before
                restarting the computer prior to another attempt and it worked
                perfectly (and the site is indeed stunning!).

                I had a guess the responsibility for the problem with Firefox might
                lie in an add-on. My first instinct was to suspect the
                Javascript-blocking NoScript, but I don't run it on that computer.
                Scanning my other extensions I noticed Flashblock. I disabled it and
                restarted and that time the site loaded perfectly. It was ironic but
                reasonable that something designed to block the use of Flash also
                blocked Microsoft's "Flash-killer" (as Silverlight is commonly
                called, with greater likelihood of eventual accuracy than the Zune
                becoming an iPod-killer, as Micrsoft had hoped).

                A curious side-note is that Safari took me to an English-language
                interface for the web site and Firefox to the original
                German-language version. Neither seems to provide the capability to
                switch to the other language, although presumably anyone interested
                in the MS images wouldn't be likely to be seriously handicapped by
                that.

                Unfortunately (although unsurprisingly given the few browsers
                explicitly supported) Silverlight doesn't work in Opera, nor in the
                last version of IE for Mac, now 6-1/2 years old and exceedingly long
                in the electronic tooth.

                John
                --
                *****
                John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
                ** panis~at~pacbell.net ** http://jmmccyoung.blogspot.com
              • dwashbur@nyx.net
                On 12 May 2008 at 11:35, John McChesney-Young wrote: [snip] ... [snip] Wow. Talk about a blatant sell-out... If Microsoft really wants to support
                Message 7 of 8 , May 12, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 12 May 2008 at 11:35, John McChesney-Young wrote:

                  [snip]
                  > >Why bring Microsoft into the equation??
                  >
                  > Another AT article on the decision to use Silverlight at the Library
                  > of Congress site:
                  >
                  > <http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080411-library-of-congress-exhibit-shows-future-of-digital-archives.html>
                  >
                  > casts light on that particular case:
                  >
                  > "You're probably wondering why the LOC is using Silverlight instead
                  > of something more widely supported, like Adobe's Flash. The answer
                  > is, of course, money. As we reported back in February, Microsoft gave
                  > the LOC $3 million to put exhibits online using Silverlight..."
                  [snip]

                  Wow. Talk about a blatant sell-out... If Microsoft really wants to support scholarship, why
                  not give the money with no strings attached? As I said, it's all about control with them.
                  They couldn't care less about advancement of knowledge.

                  Dave Washburn
                  "I'll hold the nail. And when I nod my head, you hit it with the hammer."
                • Steve Puluka
                  ... And even more interesting is this little tidbit from the user agreement: Microsoft Silverlight does not request contact information such as your name,
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 12, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On May 12, 2008, at 3:13 PM, dwashbur@... wrote:

                    >> "You're probably wondering why the LOC is using Silverlight instead
                    >> of something more widely supported, like Adobe's Flash. The answer
                    >> is, of course, money. As we reported back in February, Microsoft gave
                    >> the LOC $3 million to put exhibits online using Silverlight..."
                    > [snip]
                    >
                    > Wow. Talk about a blatant sell-out... If Microsoft really wants
                    > to support scholarship, why
                    > not give the money with no strings attached? As I said, it's all
                    > about control with them.
                    > They couldn't care less about advancement of knowledge.


                    And even more interesting is this little tidbit from the user agreement:

                    "Microsoft Silverlight does not request contact information such as
                    your name, address, or phone number. However, there are occasions
                    when Microsoft Silverlight transmits unique, computer-specific
                    information across the Internet to Microsoft, as described below."

                    With "Windows Genuine advantage" every XP system phones home with
                    information daily. Now they want this data from everyone viewing web
                    sites too. Not sure I want my browser activities monitored.

                    Steve Puluka
                    MA, Theology Duquesne University
                    Cantor Holy Ghost Church
                    Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                    Mckees Rocks, PA
                    http://puluka.com
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.