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Re: Augustine's Codices of Mark

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  • mjriii2003
    Not so fast Jim. Where is the support for Greek mss readings (or even the identifcation of the Latin witnesses) in St Augustine and although I don t have time
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 19, 2008
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      Not so fast Jim. Where is the support for Greek mss readings (or
      even the identifcation of the Latin witnesses) in St Augustine and
      although I don't have time to recheck it is doubtful that he
      commented on this disputed passage in his retractions.

      Malcolm

      ___________________


      --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "James Snapp, Jr."
      <voxverax@...> wrote:
      >
      > I was doing some reading yesterday and came across a reference
      > concerning Mark 16:9-20 which seems to be little-known (since it is
      > not in any modern textual apparatus I've seen). So it might be
      > worthwhile to give it some sunshine.
      >
      > Augustine's use of Mark 16:9-20 has never been in doubt; he quotes
      > the passage many times. Hort acknowledged, too, that Mark 16:9-20
      > occupied a prominent place in the lectionary that was used where
      > Augustine preached. But in Augustine's "Harmony of the Gospels,"
      > Book III, chapter 25, there's yet another reference.
      >
      > After stating that both Luke and Mark mention the post-resurrection
      > appearance of Christ to the two travelers on the road to Emmaus,
      > Augustine wrote as follows:
      >
      > "The latter evangelist reports the same incident in these concise
      > terms: 'And after that He appeared in another form unto two of
      them,
      > as they walked and went to a country-seat.' For it is not
      > unreasonable for us to suppose that the place of residence referred
      > to may also have been styled a country-seat; just as Bethlehem
      > itself, which formerly was called a city, is even at the present
      time
      > also named a village, although its honor has now been made so much
      > the greater since the name of this Lord, who was born in it, has
      been
      > proclaimed so extensively throughout the churches of all nations.
      In
      > the Greek codices, indeed, the reading which we discover is
      > rather 'estate' than 'country-seat.' But that term was employed
      not
      > only of residences, but also of free towns and colonies beyond the
      > city, which is the head and mother of the rest, and is therefore
      > called the metropolis."
      >
      > Here Augustine, writing c. 400 or a little later, cites the
      contents
      > of not just his favorite copy of the Latin Gospels but Greek
      codices
      > as well. In neither case does he give any hint that the passage is
      > disputed or missing in some copies; nor does he give any indication
      > that he has seen the Short Ending. So, besides Augustine, and
      > besides Augustine's lectionary, we should add Greek and Latin
      codices
      > known to Augustine, c. 400, to the list of witnesses supportive of
      > the inclusion of Mk. 16:9-20. That's no small addition.
      >
      > Yours in Christ,
      >
      > James Snapp, Jr.
      > Minister, Curtisville Christian Church
      > Tipton, Indiana
      > www.curtisvillechristian.org/Vaticanus.html
      >
    • James Snapp, Jr.
      Dear Malcolm: I m not sure I understand your question. Here again is the information: Augustine s citation of Greek manuscripts containing Mk. 16:12 is in
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 20, 2008
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        Dear Malcolm:

        I'm not sure I understand your question. Here again is the
        information:

        Augustine's citation of Greek manuscripts containing Mk. 16:12 is
        in "Harmony of the Gospels," Book III, chapter 25. He first cites
        Mk. 16:12 in a Latin form, in which the verse ends in the phrase "as
        they walked and went to a country-seat." ("Villam" is probably
        underlying "country-seat," as in the Vulgate.) Then he states, "In
        the Greek codices, indeed, the reading which we discover is
        rather 'estate' than 'country-seat.'"

        This shows that Greek codices that were available to Augustine to
        consult contained Mk. 16:9-20. Also, inasmuch as he quotes all of
        Mk. 16:9-20 in the course of his Harmony, it is equally evident that
        the passage was in the Latin text that he used.

        As for the Retractations, I don't have a copy of it handy, but I
        think that if Augustine had said anything specific to the effect that
        Mk. 16:9-20 might not be authentic, we would have heard about it.
        Probably the only thing that might be capable of interpreting as a
        symptom of second thoughts about this is his statement, somewhere, to
        the effect that the manuscripts in the more ancient and well-stocked
        libraries of major sees. But by this he may be simply offering the
        reader a way of sorting out the extremely diverse Latin texts,
        without having any particular passage in mind.

        Yours in Christ,

        James Snapp, Jr.
        Minister, Curtisville Christian Church
        Tipton, Indiana (USA)
        www.curtisvillechristian.org/MarkOne.html
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