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Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW

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  • mydogregae01
    Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt s introduction in German included.]
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 14, 2007
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      Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
      FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction in
      German included.] For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
      one, and am now sharing it.

      After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
      complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
      It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.

      The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
      images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
      modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
      only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
      information here:

      http://www.biblical-data.org/012_offer.html

      or follow link from here:

      www.Biblical-data.org

      This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
      quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
      discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
      ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at least
      not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
      payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.

      sincerely,
      Mr. Gary S. Dykes
    • Daniel B. Wallace
      Gary, the images are in color. That s not in the 1909 facsimile is it? Also, you said that you put the images on one CD. However, if each image is 74 mb and
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 15, 2007
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        Gary, the images are in color. That's not in the 1909 facsimile is it? Also, you said that you put the images on one CD. However, if each image is 74 mb and there are 222 images, I think you'd need four DVDs to get the images onto.

        Daniel B. Wallace

        ---- Start Original Message -----
        Sent: Sun, 14 Oct 2007 20:48:10 -0000
        From: "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...>
        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW

        >
        > Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
        FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction in
        German included.] For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
        one, and am now sharing it.

        After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
        complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
        It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.

        The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
        images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
        modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
        only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
        information here:

        http://www.biblical-data.org/012_offer.html

        or follow link from here:

        www.Biblical-data.org

        This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
        quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
        discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
        ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at least
        not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
        payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.

        sincerely,
        Mr. Gary S. Dykes




        ----- End Original Message -----
      • Tommy Wasserman
        Thanks Gary, One should note however, that this facsimile edition does not reflect the physical manuscript such as facsimiles usually do. In the reproduction
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 15, 2007
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          Thanks Gary,

           

          One should note however, that this facsimile edition does not reflect the physical manuscript such as facsimiles usually do. In the reproduction of the pages there has been some technique used to retouch and remove a lot of things visible on the physical manuscript.

           

          David Trobisch, on his homepages, has two images of very poor quality, which, however, can give you a general idea of how the facsimile compares with a colour photo of the real MS.

           

          With kind regards

           

          Tommy Wasserman, PhD

          Örebro Thelogical Seminary

          Sweden




          > Från: "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...>
          > Till: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
          > Rubrik: [textualcriticism] Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW
          > Datum: Sun, 14 Oct 2007 20:48:10 -0000

          Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
          FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction in
          German included.] For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
          one, and am now sharing it.

          After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
          complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
          It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.

          The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
          images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
          modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
          only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
          information here:

          http://www.biblical -data.org/ 012_offer. html

          or follow link from here:

          www.Biblical- data.org

          This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
          quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
          discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
          ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at least
          not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
          payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.

          sincerely,
          Mr. Gary S. Dykes



          Spray Webbhotell - nu får du ännu mer för pengarna. Klicka här!

        • mydogregae01
          ... it? Also, you said that you put the images on one CD. However, if each image is 74 mb and there are 222 images, I think you d need four DVDs to get the
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 15, 2007
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            --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel B. Wallace"
            <csntm@...> wrote:
            >
            > Gary, the images are in color. That's not in the 1909 facsimile is
            it? Also, you said that you put the images on one CD. However, if each
            image is 74 mb and there are 222 images, I think you'd need four DVDs
            to get the images onto.
            >

            Mr. Dykes replies:

            Putting the 72-74 MB tiff images onto 4 DVDs was an option. But as I
            mention on the ordering page on the site:

            www.biblical-data.org

            I instead chose to put them onto a single CD, via JPEG format.
            Economics are also an issue. The JPEG images, in this instance, show
            NO degradation. So it was/is best to put them all on a single disk,
            and much easier to view and use. All of the sample images on the site
            show the outstanding quality of these JPEG images, which are about 2.5
            MB in size. (Refer to the sample image, and to the wallpaper on the
            ordering page). Also, some folks (is Dr. Robinson listening?) still do
            not have DVD readers. :-)

            As to color, again I explain such questions on the ordering page. The
            first 12 pages (up to about Romans 5) of the facsimile edition is in
            full color. From then on, the images are in a sepia like brown tone.
            The color of the actual paper of the printed edition is like a light
            brown paper bag you get at a grocery store. I scanned ALL pages in
            full color -- and the resulting JPEG images are all in high resolution
            600 (DPI) and full color, 16 million or less colors.

            The facsimile edition was not printed via photolithographic offset,
            there are no dots visible under magnification. Rather, as typical of
            its era, it is a photogravure type process, and it produces great
            printing! Thus no moire effects in high resolution scans.

            The introductory PDF file on the CD also has some useful information
            as well as an image of the codex on display and its present condition.

            Dan, the CD images are equivalent to a 23-24 megapixel camera (i.e. in
            pixels 5600 x 4200), I scanned them on a very very good flat bed
            scanner. I tested the results at scans of 300, 600, 1200 and 2400 dpi,
            and went with 600 dpi. It would have been quicker if I had your new
            20-21 megapixel cameras! But then i am not complaining, the CD images
            are outstanding.

            I also did lots of post scanning work, checking to make sure no pages
            were omitted and that no margins were excessively cropped, and that
            the colors were true, et al.. I scanned at 100% size, no size changes
            of the script occurs. I did adjust the "levels" of each image in
            Photoshop to add luminosity (spelled right?), to brighten up the whole
            work, like the very day the codex was created, on fresh bright
            parchment, with fresh inks. It also makes viewing more pleasurable,
            having a brighter image(s).

            I was hoping that the CSNTM would post this codex! But got tired of
            waiting. And my current images go beyond what your new cameras are
            capable of...for the moment.

            There are so many more items to consider for posting -- like I am
            still waiting for the third edition of Stephanus' TR which you have in
            the Dallas library, [not any other edition, but the third only] I
            would love to see it on your site!! But I also know you have important
            priorities, so I must be more patient, yet 012 is now HERE!!!

            sincerely,
            Mr. Gary Dykes
          • mydogregae01
            The retouching was the printing technique which effectively removed COLOR from most of the images, to keep down the printing costs. The facsimile edition
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 15, 2007
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              The "retouching" was the printing technique which effectively removed
              COLOR from most of the images, to keep down the printing costs. The
              facsimile edition shows all of the text and the paratextual marks.

              Trobisch shows a few low resolution images, which show the current
              messed up state of the manuscript now. Yet on many pages color remains
              in the original. No real textual data is missing by eliminating the
              color in the sepia toned printing process.

              As an example, if you scanned a color image in black and white, you
              lose the color, but not the details of the script. The printers did
              not manually remove the color, it was down automatically in the
              printing process.

              hope this helps,
              Gary
            • Daniel B. Wallace
              Gary, thanks for the helpful information. We ll definitely order a copy. In light of your former desire to see the images of 012 on CSNTM s website, would you
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 15, 2007
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                Gary, thanks for the helpful information. We'll definitely order a copy. In light of your former desire to see the images of 012 on CSNTM's website, would you permit us to post the images that you have made as long as proper credit is given?

                ----- Start Original Message -----
                Sent: Mon, 15 Oct 2007 17:33:32 -0000
                From: "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...>
                To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW

                >
                > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel B. Wallace"
                <csntm@...> wrote:
                >
                > Gary, the images are in color. That's not in the 1909 facsimile is
                it? Also, you said that you put the images on one CD. However, if each
                image is 74 mb and there are 222 images, I think you'd need four DVDs
                to get the images onto.
                >

                Mr. Dykes replies:

                Putting the 72-74 MB tiff images onto 4 DVDs was an option. But as I
                mention on the ordering page on the site:

                www.biblical-data.org

                I instead chose to put them onto a single CD, via JPEG format.
                Economics are also an issue. The JPEG images, in this instance, show
                NO degradation. So it was/is best to put them all on a single disk,
                and much easier to view and use. All of the sample images on the site
                show the outstanding quality of these JPEG images, which are about 2.5
                MB in size. (Refer to the sample image, and to the wallpaper on the
                ordering page). Also, some folks (is Dr. Robinson listening?) still do
                not have DVD readers. :-)

                As to color, again I explain such questions on the ordering page. The
                first 12 pages (up to about Romans 5) of the facsimile edition is in
                full color. From then on, the images are in a sepia like brown tone.
                The color of the actual paper of the printed edition is like a light
                brown paper bag you get at a grocery store. I scanned ALL pages in
                full color -- and the resulting JPEG images are all in high resolution
                600 (DPI) and full color, 16 million or less colors.

                The facsimile edition was not printed via photolithographic offset,
                there are no dots visible under magnification. Rather, as typical of
                its era, it is a photogravure type process, and it produces great
                printing! Thus no moire effects in high resolution scans.

                The introductory PDF file on the CD also has some useful information
                as well as an image of the codex on display and its present condition.

                Dan, the CD images are equivalent to a 23-24 megapixel camera (i.e. in
                pixels 5600 x 4200), I scanned them on a very very good flat bed
                scanner. I tested the results at scans of 300, 600, 1200 and 2400 dpi,
                and went with 600 dpi. It would have been quicker if I had your new
                20-21 megapixel cameras! But then i am not complaining, the CD images
                are outstanding.

                I also did lots of post scanning work, checking to make sure no pages
                were omitted and that no margins were excessively cropped, and that
                the colors were true, et al.. I scanned at 100% size, no size changes
                of the script occurs. I did adjust the "levels" of each image in
                Photoshop to add luminosity (spelled right?), to brighten up the whole
                work, like the very day the codex was created, on fresh bright
                parchment, with fresh inks. It also makes viewing more pleasurable,
                having a brighter image(s).

                I was hoping that the CSNTM would post this codex! But got tired of
                waiting. And my current images go beyond what your new cameras are
                capable of...for the moment.

                There are so many more items to consider for posting -- like I am
                still waiting for the third edition of Stephanus' TR which you have in
                the Dallas library, [not any other edition, but the third only] I
                would love to see it on your site!! But I also know you have important
                priorities, so I must be more patient, yet 012 is now HERE!!!

                sincerely,
                Mr. Gary Dykes





                ----- End Original Message -----
              • Tommy Wasserman
                Dear Gary, Just to get everything right - my first response was direct from my memory of David Trobisch s presentation at the SBL in Groningen in 2004 - I
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 16, 2007
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                  Dear Gary,

                   

                  Just to get everything right - my first response was direct from my memory of David Trobisch's presentation at the SBL in Groningen in 2004 - I contacted David for the details about the facsmile of 012 and the physical manuscript which he saw in Dresden, and he allowed me to post his response below. It turns out that the facsimile you refer to has indeed been modified in various ways ... and that a new facsimile is on its way.

                   

                  David Trobisch writes:

                  "The facsimile is retouched and I do not mean the color of some of the letters. I saw facsimiles of Boernerianus where the color has been added by hand after the printing, which I assume was the practice of the time.

                  But what I was shocked to see was that at the end of the manuscript, after Philemon, where pages were left empty for Laodiceans and Hebrews, the facsimile shows empty pages whereas the manuscript has a Latin tractate, which has not been described or identified by the publishers of the facsimile. Likewise there is a Latin text on the pages preceding Romans 1, which is not represented in the facsimile. The text has been erased on the  reproduction.

                  Under the guidance of Professor Matthias Klinghardt of Dresden, the tractate has now been the topic of a Master's Thesis of that department. I am not sure if the results have been published yet.

                  At the same time I have been informed that a photographic reproduction is now on its way, organized by the manuscript department of the Univserity Library of Dresden. Finally."

                   

                  Tommy Wasserman, PhD

                  Örebro Theological Seminary

                  Sweden



                  Pia och Lasse träffades på Spray Date. Läs deras och andras inspirerande kärlekshistorier. Klicka här!

                • mydogregae01
                  Dr. Wasserman, Your German may be better than mine, here is part of what Dr. Reichardt says in his intro: (from image 24 on the CD)
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 16, 2007
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                    Dr. Wasserman,

                    Your German may be better than mine, here is part of what Dr.
                    Reichardt says in his intro: (from image 24 on the CD)

                    <<Im übrigen wurden die Farben, die im einfachen Licht-druck
                    verschmiert und daher störend erschienen, durch Retouchierung von der
                    Wiedergabe ausgeschlossen.>>

                    He uses an Anglicized form of the German word for "retouching", yet it
                    is in the context of "process" or "process production" - Wiedergabe.

                    Consequently one MAY infer that manual retouching of the photographic
                    prints or negatives were done to remove the colors in the ornamented
                    letters. Probably by painting over each color with an opaque pigment
                    on the negative. But ALAS!, how was the printing process done?

                    To me it would be much easier to print, but to omit the print runs
                    which add the colors to the already printed dark brown script. This
                    could also be referred to as "retouching" or part of the Wiedergabe.
                    Thus instead of manually removing one by one (hundreds and hundreds)
                    of small color marks, why not eliminate the colors via the printing
                    process? I proposed in the introductory PDF on the CD that the
                    printing process was a photogravure process, with multiple runs
                    (passes) one for each added color. Perhaps based upon Le Blond's method.

                    But we do not positively know how it was printed. In Germany in this
                    era, and England, numerous printing process were being developed and
                    used. Some were closely guarded secrets. However the facsimile edition
                    was printed -- we may be sure of the following:

                    (1) Numerous photographs were taken, probably black and white.

                    (2) Custom inks were made to match the colors of the original.

                    (3) A half tone screen was not used, the colors appear continous.


                    Less certain are:

                    (1) Each full color page received several prints (registered) for each
                    added color.

                    (2) The printing process was via a type of photo-engraved/etched plate
                    or roller.

                    The resulting accuracy and details are exquisite, the work is a
                    masterpiece. One of the best facsimile editions ever produced!

                    You could be correct to suppose that the colors were manually removed
                    plate by plate, with no impingement upon the remaining brown/black
                    script. But this seems unlikely to me, and that by "retouching"
                    Reichardt must mean, removal of ink via the printing process.

                    If anyone else can clarify this, it would be appreciated.

                    sincerely,
                    Mr. Gary S. Dykes
                  • mydogregae01
                    Dr Wasserman, Thank you for clarification. You noted that Trobisch wrote: David Trobisch writes: The facsimile is retouched and I do not mean the color of
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 17, 2007
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                      Dr Wasserman,

                      Thank you for clarification.

                      You noted that Trobisch wrote:

                      David Trobisch writes:

                      "The facsimile is retouched and I do not mean the color of some of the
                      letters. I saw facsimiles of Boernerianus where the color has been
                      added by hand after the printing, which I assume was the practice of
                      the time.
                      +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                      He needs to substantiate this claim. I too have seen THE facsimile
                      edition, and saw no added colors added by hand!!

                      +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                      But what I was shocked to see was that at the end of the manuscript,
                      after Philemon, where pages were left empty for Laodiceans and
                      Hebrews, the facsimile shows empty pages whereas the manuscript has a
                      Latin tractate, which has not been described or identified by the
                      publishers of the facsimile. Likewise there is a Latin text on the
                      pages preceding Romans 1, which is not represented in the facsimile.
                      The text has been erased on the reproduction.
                      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                      True, but for me the later added material (a commentary on Matthew in
                      Latin) was not actually part of the original codex of Paul's epistles.
                      Trobisch has gone on record on numerous occassion deploring the
                      "missing" later materials not reproduced in the 1909 facsimile
                      edition. If he feels the need to restore the later added extraneous
                      materials fine. But as for me, the preserved Pauline text is well
                      presented in the facsimile edition. "Pages" left blank for the
                      addition of Hebrews is Trobisch's conjecture as well as others.

                      His charge that colors were added to the full color folios is a
                      serious implication. I carefully examined many, I saw brush strokes,
                      but all seemed to be printed colors, not added colors outside of the
                      printing process.

                      However, I have never seen the actual remains of 012. Perhaps Trobish
                      can cheaply provide us with an image of the current coloration (in
                      ultra sharp detail). I often suspect that he views the 1909 edition as
                      competition for his upcoming expensive production.

                      sincerely,
                      Mr. Gary S. Dykes
                    • mydogregae01
                      Dr. Wasserman, Sorry for the long notes, but I now sit with my foot in my mouth. After carefully examining numerous close-ups of the colored inital letters, I
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 17, 2007
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                        Dr. Wasserman,

                        Sorry for the long notes, but I now sit with my foot in my mouth.
                        After carefully examining numerous close-ups of the colored inital
                        letters, I would agree that they were indeed hand colored AFTER the
                        printing process. I hope he/she carefully copied the color scheme.

                        I trust y'all can excuse a foolish fellow deceived by a careful
                        illiminator.

                        In some of the letters, where the actual ink has chipped/flaked away,
                        you can see where the added color flowed into that space. Now had the
                        color been original, it could not have later flowed into the flaked area.

                        A new facsimile edition would be useful. It is a costly one, as
                        multi-spectral imaging is supposed to be used. However, Dr. David
                        Trobisch has stated that it will be electronically available -- free!!
                        Good news.

                        Again thanks for your patience. This should end this discussion, from
                        which I may be a bit wiser.

                        sincerely,
                        Mr. Gary S. Dykes
                      • Kent Clarke
                        Hi All: Will these images still be posted to the CSNTM site? Kent Kent D. Clarke (Ph.D. Bristol) Reuben J. Swanson Professor of New Testament Textual
                        Message 11 of 13 , Oct 18, 2007
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                          Re: [textualcriticism] Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW Hi All:

                          Will these images still be posted to the CSNTM site?

                          Kent

                          Kent D. Clarke (Ph.D. Bristol)
                          Reuben J. Swanson Professor of New Testament
                          Textual Criticism, Greek Studies, and Hermeneutics
                          Trinity Western University
                          7600 Glover Road
                          Langley, BC
                          V2Y 1Y1
                          604-513-2121 Ext. 3116
                          kentc@...




                          On 10/14/07 1:48 PM, "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...> wrote:


                           
                           

                          Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
                          FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction in
                          German included.]  For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
                          one, and am now sharing it.

                          After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
                          complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
                          It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.

                          The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
                          images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
                          modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
                          only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
                          information here:

                          http://www.biblical-data.org/012_offer.html

                          or follow link from here:

                          www.Biblical-data.org

                          This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
                          quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
                          discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
                          ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at least
                          not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
                          payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.

                          sincerely,
                          Mr. Gary S. Dykes  

                           
                              

                        • mydogregae01
                          ... REPLY: In the future I shall send off a CD for the CSNTM website. But for now they are only available on the CD. And the CD is only available from me. The
                          Message 12 of 13 , Oct 19, 2007
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                            --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Kent Clarke <kentc@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi All:
                            >
                            > Will these images still be posted to the CSNTM site?
                            >
                            > Kent
                            >

                            REPLY:

                            In the future I shall send off a CD for the CSNTM website. But for now
                            they are only available on the CD. And the CD is only available from
                            me. The 1909 printed facsimile is quite rare, and expensive should you
                            be lucky enough to find one. The CD is a complete archival quality
                            copy of the printed edition, in high resolution, full color. The 1909
                            facsimile edition (according the Trobisch) has been THE only
                            method/way in which Biblical scholars have worked with the codex,
                            since 1945. It is a great and beautiful piece of work, worthy of your
                            institution and collection.

                            sincerely,
                            Mr. Gary S. Dykes


                            > On 10/14/07 1:48 PM, "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
                            > > FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction in
                            > > German included.] For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
                            > > one, and am now sharing it.
                            > >
                            > > After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
                            > > complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
                            > > It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.
                            > >
                            > > The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
                            > > images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
                            > > modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
                            > > only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
                            > > information here:
                            > >
                            > > http://www.biblical-data.org/012_offer.html
                            > >
                            > > or follow link from here:
                            > >
                            > > www.Biblical-data.org
                            > >
                            > > This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
                            > > quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
                            > > discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
                            > > ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at least
                            > > not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
                            > > payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.
                            > >
                            > > sincerely,
                            > > Mr. Gary S. Dykes
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Daniel B. Wallace
                            Well, almost the only way. I spent some time with Boernerianus in 2002. Since Dresden had been part of East Germany, few scholars had had an opportunity to see
                            Message 13 of 13 , Oct 20, 2007
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                              Well, almost the only way. I spent some time with Boernerianus in 2002. Since Dresden had been part of East Germany, few scholars had had an opportunity to see the manuscript. There was a log that covered more than a century. The last American to see the manuscript in the flesh had been Bacon in 1920. I also got some fresh photographs of the manuscript, but only for a few pages. Superb quality, but, as is too often the case, I was not allowed to post them on CSNTM's website.

                              Daniel B. Wallace
                              Executive Director
                              Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts
                              (www.csntm.org)

                              ----- Start Original Message -----
                              Sent: Sat, 20 Oct 2007 00:06:52 -0000
                              From: "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...>
                              To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Codex 012, Boernerianus NOW

                              >
                              > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Kent Clarke <kentc@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi All:
                              >
                              > Will these images still be posted to the CSNTM site?
                              >
                              > Kent
                              >

                              REPLY:

                              In the future I shall send off a CD for the CSNTM website. But for now
                              they are only available on the CD. And the CD is only available from
                              me. The 1909 printed facsimile is quite rare, and expensive should you
                              be lucky enough to find one. The CD is a complete archival quality
                              copy of the printed edition, in high resolution, full color. The 1909
                              facsimile edition (according the Trobisch) has been THE only
                              method/way in which Biblical scholars have worked with the codex,
                              since 1945. It is a great and beautiful piece of work, worthy of your
                              institution and collection.

                              sincerely,
                              Mr. Gary S. Dykes

                              > On 10/14/07 1:48 PM, "mydogregae01" <garyandgale@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > Textual critics, a long awaited event is here. Now you can access a
                              > > FULL copy of Codex Boernerianus. [With Dr. Reinhardt's introduction
                              in
                              > > German included.] For years I tried to access a good copy, I have
                              > > one, and am now sharing it.
                              > >
                              > > After weeks of preparation I have an extremely high resolution
                              > > complete copy of the 1909 facsimile edition of codex 012 available.
                              > > It is available on a single CD, and runs on any computer.
                              > >
                              > > The original image scans were about 74 MB apiece, there are 222
                              > > images, and thus cannot fit on my site, so I put them on a CD for a
                              > > modest cost. The resulting images are all in JPEG format. This is the
                              > > only way I can make this unique glorious resource available. More
                              > > information here:
                              > >
                              > > http://www.biblical-data.org/012_offer.html
                              > >
                              > > or follow link from here:
                              > >
                              > > www.Biblical-data.org
                              > >
                              > > This is not your typical Google scan, this is full color, of archival
                              > > quality. This is as good as it gets. Suitable for the most
                              > > discriminating textual critic or scholar. There will probably never
                              > > ever be a better edition of this Greek-Latin codex available, at
                              least
                              > > not this cheap. All orders will be filled on a first come basis, all
                              > > payments in U.S. dollars only. See site for more details.
                              > >
                              > > sincerely,
                              > > Mr. Gary S. Dykes
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >




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