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"Symbols" in Codex Bezae

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  • Bryan Cox
    Can anyone tell me more about the following symbols? Around Acts 1:12 in Codex Bezae, there are two symbols in the left margin: Codex Bezae - Acts 1:12 (1) The
    Message 1 of 2 , May 10, 2007
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      Can anyone tell me more about the following symbols?

      Around Acts 1:12 in Codex Bezae, there are two symbols in the left margin:

      Codex Bezae - Acts 1:12


      (1) The leftmost symbol appears to be a beta.  I assume this is a section marker (cf. Swanson).  The beta appears to be in miniscule form.

      (2)  The rightmost symbol appears to be an abbreviation / combination of the letters chi, rho, nu / alpha?, sigma?  I have consulted Metzger, Groningen, Maunde, and Cavallo, but I cannot find this symbol (or have missed it).  The best possibility I could come up with was a lectionary symbol, ARCH, but the more normal lectionary symbol is found a few pages later.

      Both the beta and this letter combination seem to me to be much later additions to the manuscript since miniscule and abbreviations like this one did not normally occur until after the mid-10th century. Does this seem like an accurate assessment?

      One other "symbol" I am curious about is found over the epsilon of the word ειπαν in Acts 1:11. My best guess is a non-original, "square" accent...

      Codex Bezae - Acts 1:11


      Any direct help or references to help in decoding these would be greatly appreciated.

      Thanks!
      Bryan Cox
      Plano, Tx
      Moderator, Greek Geeks YahooGroup
    • yennifmit
      Here are my guesses: The beta-like symbol may be a stylised ΑΡΧΗ, especially since it is right next to a recognisable one. The symbol above ΕΠΙΑΝ
      Message 2 of 2 , May 14, 2007
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        Here are my guesses:

        The beta-like symbol may be a stylised ΑΡΧΗ, especially since it is
        right next to a recognisable one.

        The symbol above ΕΠΙΑΝ (ΕΠΙ ΑΝ?) may be a symbol to indicate that iota
        and pi should be transposed to give the more familiar ΕΙΠΑΝ. (Although
        if that is what it is, why isn't it above the pi and iota?)

        You did not mention Garthausen in the list of books consulted. It is
        invaluable for such things:

        Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
        Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
        Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
        Druckhaus.


        Best

        Tim Finney

        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Bryan Cox" <b_coxus@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can anyone tell me more about the following symbols?
        >
        > Around Acts 1:12 in Codex Bezae, there are two symbols in the left
        > margin:
        >
        > Codex Bezae - Acts 1:12
        >
        >
        > (1) The leftmost symbol appears to be a beta. I assume this is a
        > section marker (cf. Swanson). The beta appears to be in miniscule form.
        >
        > (2) The rightmost symbol appears to be an abbreviation / combination of
        > the letters chi, rho, nu / alpha?, sigma? I have consulted Metzger,
        > Groningen, Maunde, and Cavallo, but I cannot find this symbol (or have
        > missed it). The best possibility I could come up with was a lectionary
        > symbol, ARCH, but the more normal lectionary symbol is found a few pages
        > later.
        >
        > Both the beta and this letter combination seem to me to be much later
        > additions to the manuscript since miniscule and abbreviations like this
        > one did not normally occur until after the mid-10th century. Does this
        > seem like an accurate assessment?
        >
        > One other "symbol" I am curious about is found over the epsilon of the
        > word ειπαν in Acts 1:11. My best guess is a non-original,
        > "square" accent...
        >
        > Codex Bezae - Acts 1:11
        >
        >
        > Any direct help or references to help in decoding these would be greatly
        > appreciated.
        >
        > Thanks!
        > Bryan Cox
        > Plano, Tx
        > Moderator, Greek Geeks YahooGroup
        > <http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/greek_geeks/>
        >
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