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Re: Digging Deeper With Umlauts - Mark 14:22

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  • James Snapp, Jr.
    Mark Thunderson, Maybe. That adds some tentativeness. But, as I look at Swanson, it occurs to me that the evidence in Mk. 1:24 might itself be tenuous: how
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 11, 2006
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      Mark Thunderson,

      Maybe. That adds some tentativeness. But, as I look at Swanson, it
      occurs to me that the evidence in Mk. 1:24 might itself be tenuous:
      how do we know that the unlaut was not intended to indicate the
      transposition as displayed in C, or the addition of WDE as displayed
      in W?

      Does anyone know what percentage of umlaut-occurrances are capable of
      being identified with known transpositions?

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.
    • Mark Thunderson
      Hello: With respect to the umlauts in Vaticanus, I vaguely remember reading somewhere that the ink used is the same brownish ink as the main text prior to the
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 13, 2006
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        Hello:

        With respect to the umlauts in Vaticanus, I vaguely
        remember reading somewhere that the ink used is the
        same brownish ink as the main text prior to the
        "refreshing" (which, again, if I remember correctly,
        was done in the 12th century). Can anyone verify
        that the ink used to place the umlauts is the same as
        the main text of Vaticanus?

        Mark Thunderson.



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      • James Snapp, Jr.
        Mark Thunderson: Yes; the umlauts were made with the same apricot-colored ink that the text was written in. P. B. Payne goes into some detail to emphasize
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
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          Mark Thunderson:

          Yes; the umlauts were made with the same apricot-colored ink that the
          text was written in. P. B. Payne goes into some detail to emphasize
          this point in the course of one of his essays about the umlauts,
          which are accessible online at Wieland's page about Vaticanus.

          Just because the umlauts and the text were written with the same kind
          of ink does not force the conclusion that the umlauts and the text
          were written by the same person, or even at the same place, though.
          It may have been a commonplace ink at the time.

          Does anyone know of any other MSS with apricot-tinted ink?

          Yours in Christ,

          James Snapp, Jr.
          Curtisville Christian Church
          Indiana (USA)
          www.curtisvillechristian.org/BasicTC.html
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