Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [textualcriticism] Unicode in email

Expand Messages
  • Jan Krans
    ... Well, this may be a more general problem; I would say that the time has come for accepting message with only Unicode (Extended) Greek. Outlook works OK;
    Message 1 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      David Robert Palmer wrote:

      > Are you using Unicode Greek characters? If so, I should switch to a newer
      > email application than this old Eudora. It is not rendering the Unicode.

      > Does Microsoft Outlook Express render Unicode correctly?

      Well, this may be a more general problem; I would say that the time has
      come for accepting message with only Unicode (Extended) Greek.
      Outlook works OK; Outlook Express probably as well.

      Besides, one can always consult the messages in a properly configured
      web-browser.

      Greetings,
      Jan Krans
      Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
    • Jan Krans
      ... Why use conjecture ( looks like ... could be ) when more precise information is available? Delitzsch writes in _Handschriftliche Funde_ 1, pp. 42-43 (my
      Message 2 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        > KAIPER ESTIN, and all the variants thereof in Erasmus and Aldus, means
        > "although is [present]" Thus the reading KAIPER ESTIN means essentially
        > the same as the other major present tense variant, when you consider that
        > KAI in the other main variant, "KAI PARESTIN can be interpreted as
        > "yet." Looks like KAIPER ESTIN could be a typesetting error for KAI
        > PARESTIN.

        Why use conjecture ("looks like ... could be") when more precise
        information is available? Delitzsch writes in _Handschriftliche Funde_ 1,
        pp. 42-43 (my remarks between [...]):

        καίπερ ἔστι.. T.
        [Tischendorf] bemerkt: Ϛ [TR] (= Gb [Griesbach] Sz [Scholz]) c. min.
        vix mu [cum minusculis vix multis]). In Wahrheit aber ist dieses
        ungriechisch mit dem v. fin. [verbum finitum] verbundene
        καίπερ ἔστι (in Ausg.
        2 eingeklammert) eine Schöpfung des ER. [Erasmus], deren Entstehung schon
        Bengel divinatorisch durchschaut hat. Der Cod. [min. 2814] hat nämlich
        καὶ πάρ εστι mit etwas
        abgerücktem εστι, aber unzweideutiger Accentuation und
        deutlichem α des παρ, also καὶ
        πάρεστι. ... Bis auf den heutigen Tag
        hat hier ER. den neutest. [neutestamentlichen] Textkritik getäuscht,
        nachdem er zuvor vielleicht selbst durch seinen Abschreiber getäuscht
        worden ist.

        Maybe learning some German _is_ text-critically relevant after all.

        Greetings,
        Jan Krans,
        Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
      • Wieland Willker
        If you really want EVERYBODY to be able to read your message, I suggest not to use any special fonts in email lists. Please use the transliteration suggested
        Message 3 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          If you really want EVERYBODY to be able to read your message, I suggest not to use any special fonts in email lists. Please use the transliteration suggested here:

          http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/transliteration.txt

          For accents note:
          "If accents are really necessary, to distinguish otherwise
          identical words, acute is represented by {/}, grave by {\}, and
          circumflex either by tilde {~ [preferable]} or {=} -- always
          AFTER the vowel over which it would be written."



          Best wishes
          Wieland
          <><
          ------------------------------------------------
          Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
          mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
          http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
          Textcritical commentary:
          http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
        • Jan Krans
          ... It concerns: Samuel David Luzatto, Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen, Lemberg : [Menkes], 1876. You can easily find it when
          Message 4 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            > Dear group members,
            >
            > does anybody know the e-mail address of prof. Emanuel Tov or does
            > anybody know the title of the book that Tov cites on the page 358, note
            > 10, of his Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: “Luzzatto (ed. A. I.
            > Menkes, Lemberg 1876; repr. Jerusalem 1969)“?
            > I was not successful in finding this book knowing only the year of
            > printing.
            >
            > Victor Golinets

            It concerns:
            Samuel David Luzatto, Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und
            Hagiographen, Lemberg : [Menkes], 1876. You can easily find it when
            searching on "luzzatto menkes" (and then "luzzatto erläuterungen") in
            WorldCat.

            Greetings,
            Jan Krans
            Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
          • Harold P. Scanlin
            ... Dear Viktor, It s probably his commentary, *Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen* although I don t have a copy of the book to
            Message 5 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Viktor Golinets wrote:
              Dear group members,
               
              does anybody know the e-mail address of prof. Emanuel Tov or does anybody know the title of the book that Tov cites on the page 358, note 10, of his Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: “Luzzatto (ed. A. I. Menkes, Lemberg 1876; repr. Jerusalem 1969)“?






              Dear Viktor,

              It's probably his commentary, Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen

              although I don't have a copy of the book to verify the reference.

              Harold Scanlin


            • Bob Buller
              Victor, According to the Harvard online catalog, this citation presumably refers to: Luzzatto, Samuel David, 1800-1865. Perushe Shadal : al Yirmeyah
              Message 6 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Victor,

                According to the Harvard online catalog,  this citation presumably refers to:

                Luzzatto, Samuel David, 1800-1865.
                Perushe Shadal : 'al Yirmeyah Yehezkel, Mishle ve-Iyov
                Lemberg : A. I. Menkes, 1876.
                   
                which was reprinted as

                Perush Shadal ʻal Yirmeyah, Yehezkel, Mishle ve-Iyov.
                Published :     Jerusalem : Makor, 729 [1968 or 1969]


                Bob Buller
                Society of Biblical Literature


                Viktor Golinets wrote:
                Dear group members,
                 
                does anybody know the e-mail address of prof. Emanuel Tov or does anybody know the title of the book that Tov cites on the page 358, note 10, of his Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: “Luzzatto (ed. A. I. Menkes, Lemberg 1876; repr. Jerusalem 1969)“?
                I was not successful in finding this book knowing only the year of printing.
                 
                Victor Golinets










                 All best wishes,
              • goranson@duke.edu
                ... Perhaps: Perushe Shadal `al Yirmiyahu, Yehezkel, Mishle, ve-Iyov Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen. Samuel David Luzzatto
                Message 7 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Quoting Viktor Golinets <viktor_golinets@...>:

                  > Dear group members,
                  >
                  > does anybody know the e-mail address of prof. Emanuel Tov or does
                  > anybody know the title of the book that Tov cites on the page 358,
                  > note 10, of his Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: “Luzzatto (ed.
                  > A. I. Menkes, Lemberg 1876; repr. Jerusalem 1969)“?
                  > I was not successful in finding this book knowing only the year of printing.


                  Perhaps:
                  Perushe Shadal `al Yirmiyahu, Yehezkel, Mishle, ve-Iyov
                  Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen.
                  Samuel David Luzzatto 1876
                  Hebrew Book : Microform 216 p. 22 cm.
                  Lemberg, A.I. Menkes,

                  Erläuterungen über einen Theil der Propheten und Hagiographen /
                  Samuel David Luzzatto
                  1969 [Nachdr.].
                  Hebrew Book 216 p. ; 25 cm.
                  Yerusalayim : Maqor,

                  Stephen Goranson
                  http:/wwww.duke.edu/~goranson
                • mr.scrivener
                  ... newer ... Unicode. ... has ... First of all note: The reply system in YAHOO GROUPS cannot properly copy many forms of UNICODE, as is obvious. But now for a
                  Message 8 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Jan Krans" <jlhkrans@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > David Robert Palmer wrote:
                    >
                    > > Are you using Unicode Greek characters? If so, I should switch to a newer
                    > > email application than this old Eudora. It is not rendering the Unicode.
                    >
                    > > Does Microsoft Outlook Express render Unicode correctly?
                    >
                    > Well, this may be a more general problem; I would say that the time has
                    > come for accepting message with only Unicode (Extended) Greek.
                    > Outlook works OK; Outlook Express probably as well.
                    >
                    > Besides, one can always consult the messages in a properly configured
                    > web-browser.
                    >
                    > Greetings,
                    > Jan Krans
                    > Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
                    >

                    First of all note:
                    The reply system in YAHOO GROUPS cannot properly copy many forms of UNICODE, as is obvious.

                    But now for a more important point.
                    The UNICODE looks good while you are editing in the Rich Text Editor, but is not properly stored.  You can check this by looking at your own original message.

                    This is why I am for now recommending you don't use UNICODE at all, and instead stick to the SYMBOL font. With the SYMBOL font, the user and browser will almost always be able to see the Greek,

                    And most importantly, the YAHOO message system including the Rich Text Editor can actually handle the HTML instructions to use SYMBOL, but cannot handle the UNICODE properly as far as I can see.

                    For instance, while all lines below look good while I am in the Rich Text Editor, it is another story how it looks once it is posted and requoted here in the LIST:

                    Using HTML & SYMBOL FONT, with ordinary Latin characters:


                    en arch hn o logoV kai o logoV hn proV ton qeon 

                    Now using UNICODE from the multilingual support (direct from keyboard)

                    åí áñ÷ç çí ï ëïãïò êáé ï ëïãïò çí ðñïò ôïí èåïí

                    If you quote this message, then review what was saved by YAHOO, you may see problems.  But it doesn't end here.  The List, like other scholarly lists, is resampled, quoted and archived by thousands of people and software packages, many of which only support simple ASCII text.

                     

                    In summary:

                    (1) When responding to messages, the primitive 'quoting' system for YAHOO GROUPS doesn't always properly copy or save the encoded UNICODE Greek.

                    (2) SYMBOL is a platform-independant font not only available on both IBMs and MACs, but also on all operating systems, even as old as Windows 98 or early Macs.   The point here is that you can't go by the 'latest' standard, unless you are deliberately being elitist.  In 80% of developing countries, our old second-hand computers and operating systems are not only the norm, they are the *only* available computer equipment for ordinary students and internet users.

                    (3) UNICODE both limits the operating systems that can read the messages, and also mailing systems used on the net to copy and archive text.  It further excludes large groups of users from 3rd world and developing countries.

                    (4) When text systems fail to preserve FONT information, or cannot process extended fonts like UNICODE, the base-text used by SYMBOL is both recoverable and readable without the font information.  The essential information is NOT lost.  With garbled UNICODE, the information is unreadable and unuseable, and usually unrecoverable by ordinary users.

                    (5) Other ordinary Greek fonts are so unstandardized that they are useless, because people either don't have the fonts, or don't know what the keyboard mapping is.  So SYMBOL remains the DEFAULT STANDARD for GREEK.

                    Mr. Scrivener

                    .

                  • Dr. K.Martin Heide
                    In addition, you not only find the passage in question (Rev 17:8) reproduced as a facsimile in Delitzsch s Handschriftliche Funde , you find it also in my
                    Message 9 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      In addition, you not only find the passage in question (Rev 17:8) reproduced as a facsimile
                      in Delitzsch's "Handschriftliche Funde", you find it also in my book
                      "Der einzig wahre Bibeltext? Erasmus von Rotterdam und die Frage nach dem Urtext", 4th edition (5th forthcoming), photographed from the manuscript itself (which is stored in the  library of the University of Augsburg). You can, of course
                      also order a microfilm of Codex 2814 from the Augsburg library ...

                      From these photos, everything becomes clear (I reproduced passages such as Rev 3:5; 17:13; 21:24, which are well-known for
                      their peculiar readings) : you realize Erasmus's errors for the book of Revelation, most of which were described by Delitzsch and Tregelles already,
                      beyond doubt, when you look at the manuscript itself.

                      Greetings,

                      Martin Heide




                      Maybe learning some German _is_ text-critically relevant after all.

                      Greetings,
                      Jan Krans,
                      Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam


                    • Peter Williams
                      Try Samuel David Luzzatto, Perushe Shedal, commentary on Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Proverbs, and Job. Lemberg, 1876. Best, Pete Williams ... Peter Williams Senior
                      Message 10 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Try

                        Samuel David Luzzatto, Perushe Shedal, commentary on Jeremiah, Ezekiel,
                        Proverbs, and Job. Lemberg, 1876.

                        Best,

                        Pete Williams

                        At 15:46 05/09/2006 +0200, you wrote:

                        >Dear group members,
                        >
                        >does anybody know the e-mail address of prof. Emanuel Tov or does anybody
                        >know the title of the book that Tov cites on the page 358, note 10, of his
                        >Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: "Luzzatto (ed. A. I. Menkes,
                        >Lemberg 1876; repr. Jerusalem 1969)"?
                        >I was not successful in finding this book knowing only the year of printing.
                        >
                        >Victor Golinets
                        >
                        >
                        >Besseren Schutz gegen Spam - jetzt bei dem
                        ><http://de.rd.yahoo.com/evt=40589/*http://de.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/landing.html>neuen
                        >Yahoo! Mail .
                        >
                      • Jan Krans
                        Dear fellow-listers, Something went terribly wrong with my Unicode, because of my using of a Web Browser Email Interface somewhere on-the-road. And so I have
                        Message 11 of 30 , Sep 5, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Dear fellow-listers,

                          Something went terribly wrong with my Unicode, because of my using of a
                          Web Browser Email Interface somewhere on-the-road. And so I have to admit
                          to what others tell me as well: many things can still go wrong with
                          Unicode. Thus, I will adopt the following "best practice" (for me, that
                          is): both the Unicode and the transliteration. Everybody happy, I hope.

                          Here thus my corrected and completed message:

                          =====

                          David Robert Palmer wrote:

                          > KAIPER ESTIN, and all the variants thereof in Erasmus and Aldus, means
                          > "although is [present]" Thus the reading KAIPER ESTIN means essentially
                          > the same as the other major present tense variant, when you consider that
                          > KAI in the other main variant, "KAI PARESTIN can be interpreted as
                          > "yet." Looks like KAIPER ESTIN could be a typesetting error for KAI
                          > PARESTIN.

                          Why use conjecture ("looks like ... could be") when more precise
                          information is available? Delitzsch writes in Handschriftliche Funde 1,
                          pp. 42-43 (my remarks between [...]):

                          καίπερ ἔστι.. [KAI/PER E)/STI..] T. [Tischendorf] bemerkt: Ϛ [stigma] [TR]
                          (= Gb [Griesbach] Sz [Scholz]) c. min. vix mu [cum minusculis vix
                          multis]). In Wahrheit aber ist dieses ungriechisch mit dem v. fin. [verbum
                          finitum] verbundene καίπερ ἔστι [KAI/PER E)/STI] (in Ausg. 2
                          eingeklammert) eine Schöpfung des ER. [Erasmus], deren Entstehung schon
                          Bengel divinatorisch durchschaut hat. Der Cod. [min. 2814] hat nämlich καὶ
                          πάρ εστι [KAI\ PA/R ESTI] mit etwas abgerücktem εστι [ESTI], aber
                          unzweideutiger Accentuation und deutlichem α [A] des παρ [PAR], also καὶ
                          πάρεστι [KAI\ PA/RESTI]. ... Bis auf den heutigen Tag hat hier ER. den
                          neutest. [neutestamentlichen] Textkritik getäuscht, nachdem er zuvor
                          vielleicht selbst durch seinen Abschreiber getäuscht worden ist.

                          Maybe learning some German is text-critically relevant after all.

                          Greetings,
                          Jan Krans,
                          Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

                          =====

                          SPS (Scholarly postscript): K. Martin Heide's book is an excellent reason
                          to learn German, if only to translate it into English for those who fail
                          to appreciate the beauty of that language.
                        • Daniel Buck
                          ... for the Arabic and et (tamen) adventare for the Syriac, but these are the Latin translations of these texts you find in Walton s Polyglott, of which the
                          Message 12 of 30 , Sep 7, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            David Robert Palmer <watutman@...> wrote:
                            >> At 11:00 AM 9/4/2006 +0200, K. Martin Heide wrote:
                            >Hoskier adds at the bottom of page 454 the readings "et tamen ventura"
                            for the Arabic and "et (tamen) adventare" for the Syriac,
                            but these are the Latin translations of these texts you find in
                            Walton's Polyglott, of which the "tamen" has nothing to do with the
                            Arabic and Syriac in Rev 17:8 itself.<

                            Then is Hoskier saying that the "et" here (or the equivalent therefor
                            in Arabic and Syriac) means "yet" just as also KAI can mean "yet" in
                            Greek?<<

                            I can't say off the top of my head how Syriac is specifically, but in
                            Semitic languages generally, there is generally just one word, spelled
                            with the waw used as a prefix, that is translated as 'and'. I tried
                            looking up how else it is translated but the word does not appear in
                            Strongs!
                            'Et tamen' (Latin) which would come across in English as 'and but'
                            cannot be that distincly translated from Arabic. There are two ways of
                            saying 'but': 'wa(and) lakin' or 'lakin[+ pronominal suffix]', and the
                            two are indistinguishable in translation. Similarly, Classical English
                            equates "but and if" with "but if." Modern Arabic Bibles don't use
                            either 'but' expression; they read 'kana wa laisa alan maxa anahu
                            ka'in' or 'he was and is not, although he is being' (van Dyk)
                            and 'kana wa ma xad ka'inan wa sayuTHhur thaniatan' or 'he was and did
                            not go back to being and shall appear again' (TAV).

                            Daniel Buck
                          • Dr. K.Martin Heide
                            Daniel Buck wrote: ... ventura for the Arabic and et (tamen) adventare for the Syriac, but these are the Latin translations of these texts you find in
                            Message 13 of 30 , Sep 8, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Daniel Buck wrote:

                              David Robert Palmer <watutman@.. .> wrote:
                              >> At 11:00 AM 9/4/2006 +0200, K. Martin Heide wrote:
                              >Hoskier adds at the bottom of page 454 the readings "et tamen ventura"
                              for the Arabic and "et (tamen) adventare" for the Syriac,
                              but these are the Latin translations of these texts you find in
                              Walton's Polyglott, of which the "tamen" has nothing to do with the
                              Arabic and Syriac in Rev 17:8 itself.<

                              Then is Hoskier saying that the "et" here (or the equivalent therefor
                              in Arabic and Syriac) means "yet" just as also KAI can mean "yet" in
                              Greek?<<

                              I can't say off the top of my head how Syriac is specifically, but in
                              Semitic languages generally, there is generally just one word, spelled
                              with the waw used as a prefix, that is translated as 'and'. I tried
                              looking up how else it is translated but the word does not appear in
                              Strongs!
                              'Et tamen' (Latin) which would come across in English as 'and but'
                              cannot be that distincly translated from Arabic. There are two ways of
                              saying 'but': 'wa(and) lakin' or 'lakin[+ pronominal suffix]', and the
                              two are indistinguishable in translation. Similarly, Classical English
                              equates "but and if" with "but if." Modern Arabic Bibles don't use
                              either 'but' expression; they read 'kana wa laisa alan maxa anahu
                              ka'in' or 'he was and is not, although he is being' (van Dyk)
                              and 'kana wa ma xad ka'inan wa sayuTHhur thaniatan' or 'he was and did
                              not go back to being and shall appear again' (TAV).

                              Daniel Buck


                              Hoskier simply cited the Latin translation of Walton's Syriac-and-Arabic Texts in his Polyglott.
                              Maybe he thought that would somehow corroborate the TR-reading, maybe he did it only for
                              documentation.

                              This Latin translation of both versions, however, is wrong in this place, as I will show below.

                              The Syriac in Rev 17:8 (Gwilliam's edition) reads simply (please excuse my bad transliteration here)
                              "ditheh hewa, welatheh, weqerbat" "that was, and is not, and came near".
                              No "yet", no "tamen"! The same applies to Walton's text. Walton's Latin translation, however, has "non esse, & tamen adventare",
                              which is wrong, though he hinted at the intrusion of the tamen, because it is printed in italics. Hoskier took it over, without comment.

                              Daniel Buck said:
                              'Et tamen' (Latin) which would come across in English as 'and but'
                              cannot be that distincly translated from Arabic. There are two ways of
                              saying 'but': 'wa(and) lakin' or 'lakin[+ pronominal suffix]', and the
                              two are indistinguishable in translation. Similarly, Classical English
                              equates "but and if" with "but if." Modern Arabic Bibles don't use
                              either 'but' expression; they read 'kana wa laisa alan maxa anahu
                              ka'in' or 'he was and is not, although he is being' (van Dyk)
                              and 'kana wa ma xad ka'inan wa sayuTHhur thaniatan' or 'he was and did
                              not go back to being and shall appear again' (TAV).


                              We must be very careful with modern Arabic Bibles; some of them have been
                              modified after the Vulgate or the Erasmian text. Besides, Revelation has long held a
                              non-canonical status in the East, and even some pre-Reformation mss tend to
                              assimilate to the Latin Vulgate.

                              The Arabic Bible printed in Walton's Polyglott, however, is "genuine" (not influenced by post-Reformation
                              translations, and, as the early Arabic translations are in general, translated from or at least influenced by the Bohairic:
                              see Graf, Georg: „Arabische Übersetzungen der Apokalypse“, Biblica 10 (1929), pp. 170-194)
                              and does not read the way the Arabic Bible cited by Daniel Buck reads
                              ("kana wa laisa alan ma'a annahu ka'in": "... although he is being"),
                              but neither does it read the way ist was translated in Walton's polyglott into Latin
                              ("et tamen ...").
                              The Arabic in Walton's polyglott reads as follows:
                              "takunu walaisa hiya watadhhabu wahiya muqbilatun", meaning
                              "it is and it is not and will go away and comes near [IV. stem]". Now, if you compare that with Bohairic printed in Horner's edition,
                              you will find "it is, and it is not, and it fell", which is similar, except the "comes near", which reminds us of the Syriac.

                              All that, however, is translated in Walton's polyglott with the phrase "quae erit & non est & abitura est
                              [for our German friends: you see, the beast makes "Abitur" ...], & tamen ventura".

                              Again, no "tamen", no "yet" in the Arabic text,
                              and Hoskier just cited these two Latin translations, of the Syriac and Arabic, without commment (but we wonder for what purpose???).


                              All the best, Martin


                            • mr.scrivener
                              Obviously the transposition is useful, but the unicode isn t. If you want the good looks of unicode, to compliment your transliteration, try using the Symbol
                              Message 14 of 30 , Sep 8, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Obviously the transposition is useful, but the unicode isn't.  If you want the good looks of unicode, to compliment your transliteration, try using the Symbol Font command from the Rich Text Editor.

                                Most systems, even old ones like Windows98 will have the SYMBOL font installed, so I just defined the next paragraph to have the SYMBOL font for display. Unfortunately, this won't give accents, since the SYMBOL FONT is rather tricky to add accents with.  


                                1:1 en arch hn o logoV kai o logoV hn proV ton qeon kai qeoV hn o logoV 1:2 outoV hn en arch proV ton qeon 1:3 panta di autou egeneto kai cwriV autou egeneto oude en o gegonen 1:4 en autw zwh hn kai h zwh hn to fwV twn anqrwpwn 1:5 kai to fwV en th skotia fainei kai h skotia auto ou katelaben

                                KATA IWANNHN

                                The base text was cut and pasted from some Word files I have which have the NT typed in and ready for use with the SYMBOL font. 

                                While in the Rich Text Editor, I switched to 'View HTML source' (a small box near the bottom left is clicked with a checkmark). 

                                The HTML code can only be entered if you switch to this mode and edit the actual textfile representing your message. (I switched back to 'View Finished Product' to enter in the codes as ordinary text so that you could see them.  Otherwise they'd be interpreted as HTML commands and be invisible.)

                                Next, (while still viewing the HTML source) I typed in some Element tags to enclose the Greek text I wanted to post:

                                The following line would open a bordered paragraph using the SYMBOL font:

                                <P style="BORDER-RIGHT: solid; PADDING-RIGHT: 6px; BORDER-TOP: solid; PADDING-LEFT: 6px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 6px; MARGIN: 6px; BORDER-LEFT: solid; COLOR: blue; PADDING-TOP: 6px; BORDER-BOTTOM: solid; FONT-FAMILY: SYMBOL">

                                Note that I used the PADDING instruction to give a space between the text and the box. For vertical spacing, I used <BR> (newline) in appropriate places.

                                <BR><STRONG>

                                I would paste my 'Greek Base' text here (merely latin letters that correspond to the right values for the Symbol font to display Greek)

                                Then I close the paragraph with :

                                </STRONG> /* this closes the section in Boldface Greek (symbol) */

                                <BR> /* this adds a blank line at the end of the text */

                                <CENTER> /* This starts the Title in caps and centers it  */

                                <FONT face=SYMBOL size=5>KATA IWANNHN</FONT>

                                </CENTER>


                                </P> /* this closes the whole paragraph with title */

                                This also puts the title of John's Gospel in Greek at the end of the paragraph.

                                This method, (if it works) I think is the best, because even though the 'Rich Text Editor' doesn't offer the SYMBOL font as an option from their mini-menu, it seems you can manually order it up through the HTML code. 

                                Finally, for most people, cutting and pasting 'visible' latin characters is easier than dealing with 'UNICODE' that seems to disappear, and will only be visible to people with new systems and UNICODE fonts installed.

                                So I have posted the necessary Greek WORD97 files at TC-AlternateList which you can use to cut and paste from when you want to quote the New Testament.  You should be able to copy and paste the codes from this message in another window while editing your posts in the Rich Text Editor.  The combination of having the WORD files open for the text, and having the HTML code handy to paste into your messages should give you good-looking Greek that anyone can see.


                                --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Jan Krans" <jlhkrans@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Dear fellow-listers,
                                >
                                > Something went terribly wrong with my Unicode, because of my using of a
                                > Web Browser Email Interface somewhere on-the-road. And so I have to admit
                                > to what others tell me as well: many things can still go wrong with
                                > Unicode. Thus, I will adopt the following "best practice" (for me, that
                                > is): both the Unicode and the transliteration. Everybody happy, I hope.
                                >
                                > Here thus my corrected and completed message:
                                >
                                > =====
                                >
                                > David Robert Palmer wrote:
                                >
                                > > KAIPER ESTIN, and all the variants thereof in Erasmus and Aldus, means
                                > > "although is [present]" Thus the reading KAIPER ESTIN means essentially
                                > > the same as the other major present tense variant, when you consider that
                                > > KAI in the other main variant, "KAI PARESTIN can be interpreted as
                                > > "yet." Looks like KAIPER ESTIN could be a typesetting error for KAI
                                > > PARESTIN.
                                >
                                > Why use conjecture ("looks like ... could be") when more precise
                                > information is available? Delitzsch writes in Handschriftliche Funde 1,
                                > pp. 42-43 (my remarks between [...]):
                                >
                                > καίπερ á¼"στι.. [KAI/PER E)/STI..] T. [Tischendorf] bemerkt: Ϛ [stigma] [TR]
                                > (= Gb [Griesbach] Sz [Scholz]) c. min. vix mu [cum minusculis vix
                                > multis]). In Wahrheit aber ist dieses ungriechisch mit dem v. fin. [verbum
                                > finitum] verbundene καίπερ á¼"στι [KAI/PER E)/STI] (in Ausg. 2
                                > eingeklammert) eine Schöpfung des ER. [Erasmus], deren Entstehung schon
                                > Bengel divinatorisch durchschaut hat. Der Cod. [min. 2814] hat nämlich καὶ
                                > πάρ εστι [KAI\ PA/R ESTI] mit etwas abgerücktem εστι [ESTI], aber
                                > unzweideutiger Accentuation und deutlichem α [A] des παρ [PAR], also καὶ
                                > πάρεστι [KAI\ PA/RESTI]. ... Bis auf den heutigen Tag hat hier ER. den
                                > neutest. [neutestamentlichen] Textkritik getäuscht, nachdem er zuvor
                                > vielleicht selbst durch seinen Abschreiber getäuscht worden ist.
                                >
                                > Maybe learning some German is text-critically relevant after all.
                                >
                                > Greetings,
                                > Jan Krans,
                                > Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
                                >
                                > =====
                                >
                                > SPS (Scholarly postscript): K. Martin Heide's book is an excellent reason
                                > to learn German, if only to translate it into English for those who fail
                                > to appreciate the beauty of that language.
                                >
                              • Jan Krans
                                Mr Scrivener wrote ... The symbol font has nothing to do with Greek; it only looks like it in some respects. And where are the breathings and accents?
                                Message 15 of 30 , Sep 8, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  "Mr Scrivener" wrote

                                  > Obviously the transposition is useful, but the unicode isn't. If you
                                  > want the good looks of unicode, to compliment your transliteration, try
                                  > using the Symbol Font command from the Rich Text Editor.

                                  The symbol font has nothing to do with Greek; it only looks like it in
                                  some respects. And where are the breathings and accents?

                                  Unicode is the future; I will adapt to the present for the moment (by
                                  adding a transcription) while not forgetting the future. You can skip the
                                  Unicode if to wish.

                                  BTW 1. I take at you mean "transcription", not "transposition".
                                  BTW 2. The example of my Unicode that went wrong was only due to the
                                  limitations of my provider's "webmail" editor, not to Yahoo Groups or
                                  whatever. Nevertheless I should have (tested and) noticed. In a properly
                                  configured browser, compare the correct message 2583
                                  (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/message/2583) with the
                                  scrambled message 2573
                                  (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/message/2573).

                                  Greetings,
                                  Jan Krans,
                                  Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
                                • David Robert Palmer
                                  Jan Krans wrote:
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Sep 9, 2006
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Jan Krans wrote:

                                    << Something went terribly wrong with my Unicode, because of my using of a
                                    Web Browser Email Interface somewhere on-the-road. And so I have to admit
                                    to what others tell me as well: many things can still go wrong with
                                    Unicode. Thus, I will adopt the following "best practice" (for me, that
                                    is): both the Unicode and the transliteration. Everybody happy, I hope. >>

                                    I copied your text that was gibberish, into a text editor (EditPad Lite)
                                    and saved it as JanKrans.html and then opened it with my web browser, and
                                    then it displayed the Unicode correctly.

                                    << Unicode is the future; I will adapt to the present for the moment (by
                                    adding a transcription) while not forgetting the future. You can skip the
                                    Unicode if to wish. >>

                                    Absolutely Amen to that. Unicode is the future, and really the present.

                                    I will not mess with anything but Unicode in all my Word documents from now on.

                                    David Robert Palmer
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.