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[textualcriticism] Re: The Reliability of Justin

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  • Peter M. Head
    ... No. I was making a general point and providing some concrete information about the manuscript base for our knowledge of Justin s works. ... It is helpful
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 17, 2006
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      At 20:44 15/03/2006, Jim wrote:
      >Peter M. Head,
      >
      >Even if Justin's First Apology is extant in only one located
      >manuscript, that's one more than any copy of First Apology in which
      >First Apology ch. 45 does not contain a theme and verbage
      >reminiscent of Mark 16:19-20. Caution in light of the late date of
      >the extant copy is fine; however mere caution does not justify
      >denial (denial, I mean, of a particular passage's genuineness), and
      >I don't see any feature in First Apology ch. 45 that is capable of
      >justifying such a denial. Do you?


      No. I was making a general point and providing some concrete
      information about the manuscript base for our knowledge of Justin's works.

      >I agree that it is not *certain* that Justin knows the text of the
      >LE (not to the degree that "2+2=4" is certain), but considering all
      >that seems to be on Justin's mind in ch. 45, and his use
      >of "pantachou" and a few other words in 16:19-20, in close
      >proximity, it seems more likely that he did than that such
      >overlapping verbage is fortuitous.

      It is helpful to note our agreement that it is not certain that
      Justin even knows the LE. It comes down, as you rightly noted, to a
      judgement about probability. For me, I am not too convinced that
      PANTAXOU is sufficient to prove a connection to Mark 16.20, even if a
      few other common words are also found in both texts. The emphasis on
      Jerusalem might suggest knowledge of Acts.

      1 Apol 45: That which he says, "He shall send to Thee the rod of
      power out of Jerusalem," is predictive of the mighty word, which His
      apostles, going forth from Jerusalem, preached everywhere (tou logou
      tou iscurou on apo ierousalhm oi apostoloi autou exelqonteV pantacou
      ekhruxan); and though death is decreed against those who teach or at
      all confess the name of Christ, we everywhere both embrace and teach it.

      Cheers

      Peter





      >

      Peter M. Head, PhD
      Sir Kirby Laing Senior Lecturer in New Testament
      Tyndale House
      36 Selwyn Gardens
      Cambridge CB3 9BA
      01223 566601
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