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Secret Mark: Madiotes

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  • Wieland Willker
    I have received the following private mail, of which I have removed the ... In his catalog, Smith says that the writing on the f.1.r is: 1. M. Madiotes
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 8, 2006
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      I have received the following private mail, of which I have removed the
      header:


      ----------------------------------------------
      In his catalog, Smith says that the writing on the f.1.r is:
      1. M. Madiotes (writing of the 20th century)
      2. The monk Dionysios (handwriting of the 19th century)
      3. Anobos monk of the Holy Sepulcher (18th century ?)
      Also in his catalog, Smith says that the final page verso contains "a number
      of notes, of which most concern discussing the great storm in January and
      February 1779. Carlson then quotes a section from the greek text on this
      photographed page: EIS TOIS 1779 / IANOUARIOU / XION. MEGALON That Greek
      text that Carlson quotes is full of abbreviations, etc and looks like a
      graphito or an inscription or a quick note. It looks like it should mean
      something like "towards (or better: "in") 1779, January, a great snow" Snow
      should have an omega so I'm not entirely sure. It seems clear that this
      greek phrase, according to the notes from Smith's catalog, is not the first
      page recto, but must be the final page verso. Therefore this is not the page
      that has handwriting from Madiotes. So, is sum, it seems to me that the
      handwriting is incorrectly attributed by Carlson to Madiotes, and therefore
      that the writing, instead of being evidence of a 20th century hand imitating
      a 18th century greek style, is actually evidence of an actual 18th greek
      handwriting that is in similar hand style and using a similar pen nib as the
      Clement letter dated by Smith and others to the 18th century. It seems to me
      that in this matter, it is Carlson who is being deceptive, and that this
      actually supports Smith.
      ----------------------------------------------


      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • sarban
      ... From: Wieland Willker To: Sent: Sunday, January 08, 2006 9:32 AM Subject:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 9, 2006
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Wieland Willker" <willker@...-bremen.de>
        To: <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, January 08, 2006 9:32 AM
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Secret Mark: Madiotes


        > I have received the following private mail, of which I have removed the
        > header:
        >
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------
        > In his catalog, Smith says that the writing on the f.1.r is:
        > 1. M. Madiotes (writing of the 20th century)
        > 2. The monk Dionysios (handwriting of the 19th century)
        > 3. Anobos monk of the Holy Sepulcher (18th century ?)
        > Also in his catalog, Smith says that the final page verso contains "a
        number
        > of notes, of which most concern discussing the great storm in January and
        > February 1779.

        What Smith as translated by Carlson actually says is
        "With them also conforms a number of notes of which most
        concern discussing the great storm in January and February 1779."

        It does not seem clear whether this refers ONLY to the final sheet
        discussed in the preceding sentence or in general to the annotated
        pages at the beginning and end discussed in the preceding several
        sentences.

        It would seem plausible that Smith actually meant that as well as the
        signed notes on the front and back pages there are a number
        of other notes on these pages mainly about the great storm.

        Andrew Criddle
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