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Re: S. Carlson on M. Smith's "Gospel Hoax"

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  • Chris Weimer
    You sure may! If anyone had read Stephen s blog lately, they would be directed to my comments on his book. http://neonostalgia.blogspot.com/ you can see it in
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 5, 2005
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      You sure may! If anyone had read Stephen's blog lately, they would be
      directed to my comments on his book. http://neonostalgia.blogspot.com/
      you can see it in full - read dates Oct. 2 and Oct. 3.

      Furthermore - any scholars had Secret Mark in their working theories?

      Sorry for being a tad off-topic,

      Chris
      http://neonostalgia.com

      --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, goranson@d... wrote:
      >
      > If I may, I commend _The Gospel Hoax: Morton Smith's Invention of
      _Secret Mark__
      > by Stephen C. Carlson (Baylor U. Press, Nov. 2005). Carlson present
      multiple,
      > confluent arguments pointing to Smith as the likely creator of a
      hoax, creating
      > a claimed 18th-century ms, supposedly a letter of Clement that
      quoted a secret
      > gospel. I have just read it. I had doubts here and there about the
      case, and
      > various questions remain, and, though scholars who still wish to
      defend the ms
      > as genuine (18th-c.) surely should be heard, at the moment, the
      chances of
      > vindicating "Secret Mark" appear to me almost vanishingly small.
      >
      > Smith was so learned. And, notwithstanding his cutting language,
      very generous
      > with his time, e.g., reading and commenting on papers sent to him.
      He had an
      > appreciation of theatre. And his 1982 HTR "Clement of Alexandria and
      Secret
      > Mark: The Score at the End of a Decade" certainly showed a sense of
      play. Why?
      > If he did, how could he lie to Scholem? Did Fitzmyer notice a clue
      to a hoax
      > years ago?
      >
      > In any case, in my view, this book is a fine contribution to learning.
      >
      > best,
      > Stephen Goranson
      > "Jannaeus, His Brother Absalom, and Judah the Essene"
      > http://www.duke.edu/~goranson
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