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Re: Gospel of Peter Greek and a question

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  • Wieland Willker
    ... I think that UPAKOH simply means answer here. Of the letters in question, only the final AI is safe. Everything else is open. Not even the first T is
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 4, 2004
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      Andrew Bernhard wrote:
      > how are we to take the other nominative in the sentence UPAKOH
      > ("obedience")?

      I think that UPAKOH simply means "answer" here.
      Of the letters in question, only the final AI is safe. Everything else
      is open. Not even the first "T" is safe, because have a look at how the
      scribe writes Lambda (e.g. next line). Also a Pi is possible. The Nu is
      also not safe, because there is a gap between the second and the third
      stroke.
      I have no idea what to make of this.


      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • Andrew Bernhard
      I tend to think that the Tau and Nu are comparatively certain, although your point is well taken that the handwriting does leave some room for interpretation
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 7, 2004
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        I tend to think that the Tau and Nu are comparatively certain, although your
        point is well taken that the handwriting does leave some room for
        interpretation (although I'm not sure what else the nu might be). For me the
        second letter is well taken.

        In any case, I wrote Dr. Kraus about his work and this question. The
        remainder of this email is his reply (posted with his permission):

        - - - - -

        thank you very much for your interest in my work and our edition (which took
        quite some time to get finished). our main focus was the transcription of
        the text according to quality photos and a translation with short
        commentaries in order to enable scholars to start the discussion of the two
        texts (GosPet, ApocPet) anew, then without the often ideological burden (of
        being of minor importance and quality).

        in our edition we print the text according to the letters given on the
        parchment which could be easily read, even if there are quite a number of
        corrections, above all letters written over previous ones.

        you mention GosPet 42: we print an emendation "OTI NAI" and list in the
        apparatus the consequence of letters visible on the parchment "TINAI" with
        the first iota written over another letter (basically and personally, I see
        this as a letter started and not finished, definitely not a upsilon, tau,
        ...). nevertheless, the iota is obvious (just compare, for instance, the
        iota in the following NAI)
        luehrmann in his "Fragmente" set "TO NAI" (literally, "the yes" or so),
        which would be possible as well and only make a stylistic difference. we
        stuck to "OTI NAI" in order to keep the sequence of TINAI (with O missing at
        the start) and to clearly preserve the OTI as usual introduction of direct
        speech.

        furthermore, you refer to the meaning and translation of that verse: the
        UPAKOH is to be taken as the subject of HKOUETO, of course. there is a
        second meaning (at least a second one) of UPAKOH: reply made to a
        question/answer derived from the usage of the verb UPAOUW (see Plato, Soph.
        217d - noun; Plato, Phd. 59e; Xenophon, Symp. 1,11 a.o.). - see
        Danker/Bauer; LSJ
        this fits pretty well within the context as well: question in GosPet 41,
        answer in 42.

        we gave the following translations: "Und vom Kreuz her hörte man die
        Antwort: `Ja´." - "And a response was heard from the cross: `Yes´."

        well, I do not know whether that leads to anything at all (see the intention
        of the volume).

        Thomas
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