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Unidentified fragment

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  • Wieland Willker
    James M. Darlack, Assistant Librarian at Goddard Library, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, asked me about the following fragment, which he found in their
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 21, 2005
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      James M. Darlack, Assistant Librarian at Goddard Library, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, asked me about the following fragment, which he found in their collection:

      The description is as follows:
      Papyrus Fragment (10.8 x 9.8 cm.)
      "This fragment is part of the Babson Collection in the rare book room of Goddard Library. The fragment was previously owned by the Open Church Foundation Bible Museum, Gloucester, Massachusetts, and before that by Roger Babson. When the fragment was received by Goddard Library in the early 1970s, it was accompanied by a sign which read: “100-200 A.D. Fragment of Bible script on parchment.” However, the material is not parchment, the library has been unable to verify that the text is from the Bible, and the dating too is in question. Even the language and type of script remain unidentified, although it may be cursive Greek. Compare the similar “fragmentary Greek papyrus” from the Nahal Hever cave, circa 132 A.D., a photograph of which was published in the Israel Exploration Journal; v. 12, no. 3-4 (1962): plate 32."

      The Verso is blank.

      I have put online an image at:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/fragment_b.jpg

      The questions are:
      language? script? date? content?

      Best wishes
      Wieland
      <><
      ------------------------------------------------
      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
      mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
      Textcritical commentary:
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
    • Dave Washburn
      ... So whoever gave it to the library got everything wrong except possibly the word fragment ? That s funny. -- Dave Washburn http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 22, 2005
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        On Monday 22 August 2005 00:07, Wieland Willker wrote:
        > James M. Darlack, Assistant Librarian at Goddard Library, Gordon-Conwell
        > Theological Seminary, asked me about the following fragment, which he found
        > in their collection:
        >
        > The description is as follows:
        > Papyrus Fragment (10.8 x 9.8 cm.)
        > "This fragment is part of the Babson Collection in the rare book room of
        > Goddard Library. The fragment was previously owned by the Open Church
        > Foundation Bible Museum, Gloucester, Massachusetts, and before that by
        > Roger Babson. When the fragment was received by Goddard Library in the
        > early 1970s, it was accompanied by a sign which read: “100-200 A.D.
        > Fragment of Bible script on parchment.” However, the material is not
        > parchment, the library has been unable to verify that the text is from the
        > Bible, and the dating too is in question. Even the language and type of
        > script remain unidentified, although it may be cursive Greek. Compare the
        > similar “fragmentary Greek papyrus” from the Nahal Hever cave, circa 132
        > A.D., a photograph of which was published in the Israel Exploration
        > Journal; v. 12, no. 3-4 (1962): plate 32."

        So whoever gave it to the library got everything wrong except possibly the
        word "fragment"? That's funny.

        --
        Dave Washburn
        http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
        "Well, if I'd wanted a safe life, I guess I wouldn't have
        married a man who studies rocks." - Betty Armstrong (Fay Masterson)
      • Wieland Willker
        Thanks to all, who responded! There is an overall agreement on date and content. Papyrus, 6th or 7th CE Greek minuscule, documentary Readings: l. 2 tou
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 22, 2005
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          Thanks to all, who responded!
          There is an overall agreement on date and content.

          Papyrus, 6th or 7th CE
          Greek minuscule, documentary

          Readings:
          l. 2 tou kefal[aiou]
          l. 3 *]p?eri touto[u*
          l. 4 tOi

          tou kephalaiou = the capital, this seems to point to a loan (capital and interest), a contract, perhaps a private letter.

          Best wishes
          Wieland
          <><
          ------------------------------------------------
          Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
          mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
          http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
          Textcritical commentary:
          http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/index.html
        • Jack Kilmon
          ... From: Dave Washburn To: Sent: Monday, August 22, 2005 8:45 AM Subject: Re: [textualcriticism]
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 3, 2005
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Dave Washburn" <dwashbur@...>
            To: <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, August 22, 2005 8:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Unidentified fragment


            > On Monday 22 August 2005 00:07, Wieland Willker wrote:
            >> James M. Darlack, Assistant Librarian at Goddard Library, Gordon-Conwell
            >> Theological Seminary, asked me about the following fragment, which he
            >> found
            >> in their collection:
            >>
            >> The description is as follows:
            >> Papyrus Fragment (10.8 x 9.8 cm.)
            >> "This fragment is part of the Babson Collection in the rare book room of
            >> Goddard Library. The fragment was previously owned by the Open Church
            >> Foundation Bible Museum, Gloucester, Massachusetts, and before that by
            >> Roger Babson. When the fragment was received by Goddard Library in the
            >> early 1970s, it was accompanied by a sign which read: “100-200 A.D.
            >> Fragment of Bible script on parchment.” However, the material is not
            >> parchment, the library has been unable to verify that the text is from
            >> the
            >> Bible, and the dating too is in question. Even the language and type of
            >> script remain unidentified, although it may be cursive Greek. Compare the
            >> similar “fragmentary Greek papyrus” from the Nahal Hever cave, circa 132
            >> A.D., a photograph of which was published in the Israel Exploration
            >> Journal; v. 12, no. 3-4 (1962): plate 32."
            >
            > So whoever gave it to the library got everything wrong except possibly the
            > word "fragment"? That's funny.

            I think it more likely that the tag belonged to a different text fragment.

            Jack
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