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Re: PhD programs in OT text

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  • Daniel Buck
    Ron Minton quoted:
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 15, 2005
      Ron Minton quoted:
      <<< I recently did a quick survey of the TNIV, and found the number
      of times non-Hebrew sources are cited for variant readings. I got
      the following totals:


      LXX: 313 times

      Syriac: 116 times

      Vulgate: 76 times

      Dead Sea Scrolls: 42 times

      Samaritan Pentateuch: 21 times

      "Probable reading of the original Hebrew text" (conjecture): 15 imes
      Targum: 12 times
      "An ancient Hebrew scribal tradition" (Qere): 8 times
      Aquila: 7 times
      Symmachus: 2 times
      Theodotion: 2 times
      Old Latin: 2 times
      Arabic: 2 times
      Josephus: 1 time>>>

      I'd like to see the verse citations for these last few.

      Jean, what do you think of Arabic as a source reading for an English
      translation? Obviously, the oldest Arabic MSS isn't any older than
      our earliest copies of the MT.

      I imagine Josephus is cited for Saul's age in I Samuel 13:1. That's
      quite inconsistent in my opinion, since no one that I know of has
      ever followed the reading of Josephus, Julius Africanus, or any
      historian for the name of Salah's father in Luke 3:36. Following the
      text makes no less sense historically in one passage than the other,
      and there's ancient evidence (02 03 and 05, respectively) for
      omitting both problem passages altogether.

      One thing that would make modern English version textual notes much
      more useful would be to specify the MS behind a reading. Most of the
      time in the NT it's going to be either 01 or 03, or both (02 in
      Revelation). In the LXX it's going to be 02 or 03 almost every time.
      In the space that it takes to print "Other ancient authorities add"
      or "the earliest and best manuscripts omit" you could just cite the
      MSS themselves most of the time.

      In the NT, the weight given to 01 02 03 04 is such that no other MSS
      would ever need to be cited beyond these.

      Can anyone think of a reading cited in the margin of any English NT
      that would be based on any Greek MSS other than those 4?

      Daniel Buck
    • Scott Charlesworth
      Leiden University is very strong in this area and offers an online masters level course called Textual Criticism and Textual History of the Old Testament.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 15, 2005
        Leiden University is very strong in this area and offers an online masters level course called Textual Criticism and Textual History of the Old Testament.
         
        Scott Charlesworth
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, July 16, 2005 1:13 AM
        Subject: [textualcriticism] PhD programs in OT text

        I just received the note below (partial) from a previous student who is academically oriented and, I feel, is qualified to do PhD work.  Can anyone recommend some schools that fit his interest?

        ……………………

        Hi Dr. Minton,

         

        Hopefully you are still getting emails at this address. I recently did a quick survey of the TNIV, and found the number of times non-Hebrew sources are cited for variant readings. I got the following totals:

         

        LXX: 313 times

        Syriac: 116 times

        Vulgate: 76 times

        Dead Sea Scrolls: 42 times

        Samaritan Pentateuch: 21 times

        "Probable reading of the original Hebrew text" (conjecture): 15 times

        Targum: 12 times

        "An ancient Hebrew scribal tradition" (Qere): 8 times

        Aquila: 7 times

        Symmachus: 2 times

        Theodotion: 2 times

        Old Latin: 2 times

        Arabic: 2 times

        Josephus: 1 time

         

        …………..

        I was just thinking about exploring Ph.D. programs where I could do work in OT text criticism. Any ideas?

        Thanks,

        Steven Anderson

         

         

      • Dr P.J. Williams
        ... Doctoral work on the TC of the HB can be pursued at Aberdeen University under Joachim Schaper, Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer or myself. Best wishes, P.J. Williams
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 20, 2005
          > I just received the note below (partial) from a previous student who is
          > academically oriented and, I feel, is qualified to do PhD work. Can
          > anyone recommend some schools that fit his interest?

          Doctoral work on the TC of the HB can be pursued at Aberdeen University
          under Joachim Schaper, Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer or myself.

          Best wishes,

          P.J. Williams
        • Daniel Buck
          ... Samuel 13:1. That s quite inconsistent in my opinion, since no one that I know of has ever followed the reading of Josephus, Julius Africanus, or any
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 16, 2005
            "Daniel Buck" wrote:
            > I imagine Josephus is cited [in the TNIV] for Saul's age in I
            Samuel 13:1. That's quite inconsistent in my opinion, since no one
            that I know of has ever followed the reading of Josephus, Julius
            Africanus, or any historian for the name of Salah's father in Luke
            3:36. Following the text makes no less sense historically in one
            passage than the other, and there's ancient evidence (02 03 and 05,
            respectively) for omitting both problem passages altogether.>

            I checked into this myself, and my surmising was untrue. The TNIV
            cites Byzantine manuscripts for Saul's age (30), and a textual
            reconstruction for the years of his reign (42)--thus reversing the
            numbers in the original NASB.

            The Qumran scroll 4Q51 has a Hebrew text which seems to underlie the
            LXX in I and II Samuel, but it is deficient before chapter 14, so
            there's no B.C.E. MS evidence for or against the inclusion of I
            Samuel 13:1.

            Likewise, there's no equally ancient evidence for or against the
            inclusion of "Cainan" in Genesis 5:24 (which is presumed to underlie
            Luke 3:36). So the CBT's inequal treatment of these two passages
            serves as a lopsided exception to their general tendency to add to
            the Hebrew and subtract from the Greek.

            Daniel Buck
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