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Re: Not to forget Pythagorean Considerations

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  • Harvey D Norris
    Heres how that applies. If we take a full R value in series, the voltage across it will be the amperage times its ohmic value. This means that by reducing R by
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 30 8:49 AM
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      Heres how that applies. If we take a full R value in series, the voltage across it will be the amperage times its ohmic value. This means that by reducing R by one half, the voltage will also be halved. Now if the remaining half of the R value is given to X(L) as the R(int) value, the voltages across both X(L) and R/2 will not be summed or averaged. The new value corresponds to the hypotenus length using R/2 and X(L) as vector components. In other words we add the squares of both quantities, and then take the square root of the sum. If R<<L, then the new ohmic quantity will only be slightly larger. Thus adding internal resistance to L will increase the voltage across it in the LCR series.

      --- In teslafy@yahoogroups.com, "Harvey D Norris" <harvich@...> wrote:
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      > http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtxSE_nSjHnseDnsPxnRLxnty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20120326041810AANdq9i
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      > In RLC series circuits, the voltage across each component is determined by the multiplication of the amperage, which is found by the impedance Z quantity, and is identical across all the elements in the series chain. The reactive elements in the chain of course may appear as a higher ohmic value, and thus have more voltage appearing across them to enable the common amount of current in the chain. But these in fact are created in opposite pairs of cancelling reactances. It is perfectly possible to find a situation where the voltage across the R value is slightly larger then the voltage across L. But what if the R value is entirely contained as R(int) of the inductor, will the voltage across the combined parts be the average of each separate voltage prediction? the engineering response better as Roger is correct.
      > http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AhoYoG9TPwKNgnGbqnXTMNbty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20120326041543AAwNI60
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