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Fw: [free_energy] Good Explanation of Tesla "non-Hertzian" Waves

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  • eric
    a cross post with permission: actually, power could be distributed by shaft. The losses and stored rotational inertia are in many ways analogous to
    Message 1 of 1 , May 18, 2003
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      a cross post with permission:

      actually, power could be distributed by shaft. The losses and stored rotational inertia
      are in many ways analogous to distributing power via electric lines. My electrical
      engineering profs identified Tesla as being clearly right about obvious advantages of
      - no cover up there.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Gary Skimin" <garys_2k@...>
      To: "eric krieg" <eric@...>
      Sent: Thursday, May 15, 2003 12:09 PM
      Subject: Re: [free_energy] Good Explanation of Tesla "non-Hertzian" Waves


      > I came from western New York State, about 20 miles
      > from Niagara Falls, so we did get a bit more exposure
      > to Tesla via local history lessons. He was the guy
      > that installed the first generators there and sent the
      > power forty miles to Buffalo, thereby proving that AC
      > was the way to go. Sorry, Edison, DC wouldn't cut it!
      >
      > BTW, a little-now-known factoid of that time proposed
      > sending the hydro energy from Niagara Falls to Buffalo
      > via a huge rotating line shaft! Have you ever seen
      > those pictures of old machine shops, with shafts and
      > belt-driven equipment all over? THAT was considered as
      > a way of sending the power, with factories along the
      > way buying rights to wrap a belt around the shaft and
      > use the power. Could you imagine?
      >
      > Anyway, I know Tesla's usually used as some sort of
      > free energy visionary, I'm guessing the guy went a bit
      > batty in his later years. Too bad, too, 'cause he
      > really was a genius earlier on. His pursuit of energy
      > transmission via non-Hertzian waves was based on bad
      > physics and a lack of understanding what a broadcast
      > system poorly matched to the air's impedance would do
      > (as explained in that link).
      >
      > I can't wait to hear how Lee will spin his crystal
      > radio-level power transmissions to be a breakthrough.
      > Ought to be entertaining, to say the least.
      >
      > --- eric krieg <eric@...> wrote:
      > > I believe there are a number of fringe books about
      > > Tesla that make
      > > the guy look like some sort of god. He did great
      > > things early on and
      > > didn't get credit for it, but much of his later work
      > > was investor-draining
      > > nonsense. The books just try to spin rumors around
      > > the failures. I
      > > have not heard much new from the group trying to
      > > resurrect the "tesla
      > > turbine". Next week, Dennis Lee (who bought the
      > > bankrupt Tesla
      > > society) is going to do another demonstration of
      > > remote power
      > > transmission . . . only showing milliwatts
      > > transmitted at poor
      > > efficiencies.
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
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