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Malick interview uploaded

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  • vanvutu
    I just uploaded Malick s other interview to the Files section of this board. Christine Lui, the founder and owner of this board, actually has another 1975
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 18, 2008
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      I just uploaded Malick's other interview to the Files section of this
      board. Christine Lui, the founder and owner of this board, actually
      has another 1975 Malick interview available for viewing at this board:
      (http://www.eskimo.com/~toates/malick/art6.html).

      The one I uploaded is the one he did with Michel Ciment in Positif,
      and is appended at the end of the new book on Malick by Lloyd Michaels
      I just finished reading. Hope the Malick fans, and particularly the
      BADLANDS fans, will find it interesting.

      The September/October issue of Film Comment features CHE on the cover
      and features Amy Taubin's interview with Soderbergh. There is some
      mention of Malick's early interest in the project.
      http://www.filmlinc.com/fcm/so08/che.htm

      I have seen the trailers, and CHE looks amazing. But I was able to
      resist seeing the special roadshow 4-hour version mainly because I
      hate the particular Landmark theatre in LA it was showing at. I don't
      mind waiting till it goes wide, and broken into two different films,
      in January. Amy Taubin, a critic I enormously respect, called it a
      "masterpiece." But she also loved Jean Luc-Godard's ÉLOGE DE L'AMOUR
      (aka L'Crap).

      But I think 2008 was a GREAT year for movies. I enjoyed the delightful
      FLIGHT OF THE RED BALLOON. As romantic comedies go, I also thought IN
      SEARCH OF A MIDNIGHT KISS was really good. More recently, I really
      enjoyed seeing MILK at the historic Castro Theatre (the *perfect*
      place to see it!) in San Francisco over Thanksgiving weekend. I sorta
      liked WENDY AND LUCY, which I thought was very well acted and was
      poignant and all; however, I'm not sure it had enough material to
      justify a feature-length film. Critics described it as understated,
      but I found it touching but ultimately underwhelming. One film I can't
      wait to see is WALTZ WITH BASHIR.

      Hands down, the best film I saw this year was LET THE RIGHT ONE IN.
      From the opening shot of the snow falling against the blackest night,
      accompanied by that melancholy music, I was *hooked.* The filmmakers
      have a very strong aesthetic, as the composition of each scene was
      carefully set up and beautiful to behold...I love every frame of this
      movie...The cinematography is gorgeous. The acting by the two child
      leads is incredible and totally believable. My favorite scenes are the
      ones where they are together are wonderful. I came in thinking this
      was going to be another "low-budget horror film", but it turned out to
      be a deeply touching coming-of-age story of friendship and love as
      well. The ending is *brilliant.*I have already seen this film five
      times now, each time at the same West Hollywood Laemmle theatre (and
      each time enjoying a nice hot cup of Earl Grey before the show at the
      nearby cafe directly across from the Directors Guild of America). I
      intend to see it several more times before its theatrical run ends.
      This film is well on its way to cult status.

      I would like to say something about the score. There is a recurring
      music cue called "Eli's Theme" that has been playing in my head over
      and over and over (just as every scene of this beautiful film has been
      doing).If anyone is interested in hearing it, I put an audio-only
      YouTube link here:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TerKgrAFQ5k

      I prefer the classical guitar and strings version of this theme, which
      appears in the two scenes where the boy visits his father in the
      countryside. It also makes a brief reprise over the end credits as well:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iivf1dN5Xg&feature=related

      Wow, I have been thinking and thinking about this film *a lot* in
      between repeated viewings. The last film that has occupied my mind
      this much was...THE THIN RED LINE.
    • Angela Havel
      Tuan: Thank you for posting the Malick interview. Great present for the holidays. I also checked out the YouTube links to your favorite film of 2008, and read
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 20, 2008
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        Tuan:

        Thank you for posting the Malick interview. Great present for the holidays.

        I also checked out the YouTube links to your favorite film of 2008, and read some reviews at IMDb. One line that tells me I'd like this one too: *Let the Right one In* is like no other vampire movie that I have ever
        seen. It is smarter, scarier and more nuanced. It doesn't feel like a
        thriller, it feels like literature.

        I haven't seen one new film from this year, or last year either, actually for several years...the trailer has to stand out a lot for me to want to take the time and effort to find the film.

        By the way, the new Brad Pitt film where he reverse ages (dorky title, Benjamin Button) uses the Saint Saens music "The Aquarium" from Carnival des Animeaux--same music Days of Heaven's opening credits uses--did anyone else notice? I'd be interested to
        hear if anyone here likes this one...looks like it could easily descend into schlock-dom...some non-classical bits of the score in the trailer signal "feel good film" (ugh) and the couple of Pitt's old-man-spouting-aphorisms voice overs struck me wrong.

        Maybe I'm being too harsh...

        Angela

        --- On Thu, 12/18/08, vanvutu <vanvutu@...> wrote:

        From: vanvutu <vanvutu@...>
        Subject: [terrencemalick] Malick interview uploaded
        To: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, December 18, 2008, 3:12 PM











        I just uploaded Malick's other interview to the Files section of this

        board. Christine Lui, the founder and owner of this board, actually

        has another 1975 Malick interview available for viewing at this board:

        (http://www.eskimo com/~toates/ malick/art6. html).



        The one I uploaded is the one he did with Michel Ciment in Positif,

        and is appended at the end of the new book on Malick by Lloyd Michaels

        I just finished reading. Hope the Malick fans, and particularly the

        BADLANDS fans, will find it interesting.



        The September/October issue of Film Comment features CHE on the cover

        and features Amy Taubin's interview with Soderbergh. There is some

        mention of Malick's early interest in the project.

        http://www.filmlinc .com/fcm/ so08/che. htm



        I have seen the trailers, and CHE looks amazing. But I was able to

        resist seeing the special roadshow 4-hour version mainly because I

        hate the particular Landmark theatre in LA it was showing at. I don't

        mind waiting till it goes wide, and broken into two different films,

        in January. Amy Taubin, a critic I enormously respect, called it a

        "masterpiece. " But she also loved Jean Luc-Godard's ÉLOGE DE L'AMOUR

        (aka L'Crap).



        But I think 2008 was a GREAT year for movies. I enjoyed the delightful

        FLIGHT OF THE RED BALLOON. As romantic comedies go, I also thought IN

        SEARCH OF A MIDNIGHT KISS was really good. More recently, I really

        enjoyed seeing MILK at the historic Castro Theatre (the *perfect*

        place to see it!) in San Francisco over Thanksgiving weekend. I sorta

        liked WENDY AND LUCY, which I thought was very well acted and was

        poignant and all; however, I'm not sure it had enough material to

        justify a feature-length film. Critics described it as understated,

        but I found it touching but ultimately underwhelming. One film I can't

        wait to see is WALTZ WITH BASHIR.



        Hands down, the best film I saw this year was LET THE RIGHT ONE IN.

        From the opening shot of the snow falling against the blackest night,

        accompanied by that melancholy music, I was *hooked.* The filmmakers

        have a very strong aesthetic, as the composition of each scene was

        carefully set up and beautiful to behold...I love every frame of this

        movie...The cinematography is gorgeous. The acting by the two child

        leads is incredible and totally believable. My favorite scenes are the

        ones where they are together are wonderful. I came in thinking this

        was going to be another "low-budget horror film", but it turned out to

        be a deeply touching coming-of-age story of friendship and love as

        well. The ending is *brilliant.* I have already seen this film five

        times now, each time at the same West Hollywood Laemmle theatre (and

        each time enjoying a nice hot cup of Earl Grey before the show at the

        nearby cafe directly across from the Directors Guild of America). I

        intend to see it several more times before its theatrical run ends.

        This film is well on its way to cult status.



        I would like to say something about the score. There is a recurring

        music cue called "Eli's Theme" that has been playing in my head over

        and over and over (just as every scene of this beautiful film has been

        doing).If anyone is interested in hearing it, I put an audio-only

        YouTube link here:

        http://www.youtube com/watch? v=TerKgrAFQ5k



        I prefer the classical guitar and strings version of this theme, which

        appears in the two scenes where the boy visits his father in the

        countryside. It also makes a brief reprise over the end credits as well:

        http://www.youtube com/watch? v=0iivf1dN5Xg& feature=related



        Wow, I have been thinking and thinking about this film *a lot* in

        between repeated viewings. The last film that has occupied my mind

        this much was...THE THIN RED LINE.





























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bilge Ebiri
        ... credits uses--did anyone else notice? I d be interested to ... I actually really liked this film. It s not as feel-good-y as it may seem, despite some
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 20, 2008
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          > By the way, the new Brad Pitt film where he reverse ages (dorky title,
          > Benjamin Button) uses the Saint Saens music "The Aquarium" from Carnival
          > des Animeaux--same music Days of Heaven's opening
          credits uses--did anyone else notice? I'd be interested to
          >hear if anyone here likes this one...looks like it could easily descend
          >into schlock-dom...some non-classical bits of the score in the trailer
          >signal "feel good film" (ugh) and the couple of Pitt's
          >old-man-spouting-aphorisms voice overs struck me wrong.


          I actually really liked this film. It's not as feel-good-y as it may seem,
          despite some surface similarities with FORREST GUMP. It's actually more of a
          feel-bad kind of film if you ask me. Or, as I put it to a friend: It's the
          film FORREST GUMP should have been. Not some self-congratulatory spectacle
          about "living your life to the fullest" but an epic of regret and longing
          about what happens when you don't.

          That music is *only* in the credits, and what a blessed thing that is, too.
          If there's one thing I hate, it's movies utilizing classical pieces that
          were already used much more notably in previous films. Same goes for pop
          songs, too, actually.


          -Bilge
        • vanvutu
          Angela - Thank you for your reply. I am glad my post piqued your interest in checking this film out. The trailers emphasize the horror elements -- and they are
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 20, 2008
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            Angela -

            Thank you for your reply. I am glad my post piqued your interest in
            checking this film out. The trailers emphasize the horror elements --
            and they are there in the film -- but the film also explores
            universal themes like loneliness and alienation and
            friendship...about being victimized and victimizing others. I can see
            how some horror film fans might be disappointed. Let's face it; most
            people who go to see horror films want to see death and dismemberment.
            (Same with war movies.) But Lina Leandersson (who plays Eli) put it
            succinctly when she said in a subtitled interview (available on
            YouTube), "It's about how they (Oskar and Eli) become friends. And
            then they become better friends. And then some nasty stuff happens."
            LOL!

            I saw it again last night and still marvel at the beautiful story,
            wonderful acting, and cinematography. The film has these "interludes"
            between major scenes where they highlight the beautiful snow-covered
            scenery, at times accompanied by the moody score. I think the
            filmmakers do for snow and ice what Malick did for wheatfields and
            Kunai grass!

            A lot is only hinted at in the move, and it's been great hearing the
            conversations taking place after the movie ends among the audience
            members about Eli's "back story," and that "happy ending"(heh heh).

            Two more music cues from the movie:

            "Oskar in Love"(it starts out just sounding like someone noodling on
            the piano but then becomes quite sad and affecting):
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqIk0WUH7hg&feature=related

            And this one is very beautiful as well (a reprise of the cues I
            included in my original post):
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRaKk_qqVXg&feature=related

            It's best to enjoy this film on the big screen in a darkened theater,
            but if it's not playing near where you live, the DVD will come out in
            March.




            --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Angela Havel <anghave@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Tuan:
            >
            > Thank you for posting the Malick interview. Great present for the
            holidays.
            >
            > I also checked out the YouTube links to your favorite film of 2008,
            and read some reviews at IMDb. One line that tells me I'd like this
            one too: *Let the Right one In* is like no other vampire movie that I
            have ever
            > seen. It is smarter, scarier and more nuanced. It doesn't feel like
            a
            > thriller, it feels like literature.
            >
            > I haven't seen one new film from this year, or last year either,
            actually for several years...the trailer has to stand out a lot for
            me to want to take the time and effort to find the film.
            >
            > By the way, the new Brad Pitt film where he reverse ages (dorky
            title, Benjamin Button) uses the Saint Saens music "The Aquarium"
            from Carnival des Animeaux--same music Days of Heaven's opening
            credits uses--did anyone else notice? I'd be interested to
            > hear if anyone here likes this one...looks like it could easily
            descend into schlock-dom...some non-classical bits of the score in
            the trailer signal "feel good film" (ugh) and the couple of Pitt's
            old-man-spouting-aphorisms voice overs struck me wrong.
            >
            > Maybe I'm being too harsh...
            >
            > Angela
            >
          • Oscar Houck
            Thanks Bilge for the mini-review on Benjamin Button. You re a critic that I trust and I was on the fence about that one. It s great that people are checking in
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 20, 2008
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              Thanks Bilge for the mini-review on Benjamin Button. You're a critic that I trust and I was on the fence about that one. It's great that people are checking in with favorite movies now that we're in "the season" for movies. I really liked "Rachel Getting Married" but it's not for the emotionally squeamish. Mainly the acting was incredible, especially Ann Hathaway. Very difficult material but I thought it felt honest. Not to give too much away, but at first you wonder how anyone could be as narcissistic as her character. Then, as the story reveals its layers, you begin to realize how courageous she is, and that simple survival for some is heroic. Not a bad message if you want to call it that. This one is for anyone that grew up in a dysfunctional family (most of us, definitely me).
               
              My holiday best, Oscar




              ________________________________
              From: Bilge Ebiri <ebiri@...>
              To: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2008 11:45:43 AM
              Subject: Re: [terrencemalick] Malick interview uploaded


              > By the way, the new Brad Pitt film where he reverse ages (dorky title,
              > Benjamin Button) uses the Saint Saens music "The Aquarium" from Carnival
              > des Animeaux--same music Days of Heaven's opening
              credits uses--did anyone else notice? I'd be interested to
              >hear if anyone here likes this one...looks like it could easily descend
              >into schlock-dom. ..some non-classical bits of the score in the trailer
              >signal "feel good film" (ugh) and the couple of Pitt's
              >old-man-spouting- aphorisms voice overs struck me wrong.

              I actually really liked this film. It's not as feel-good-y as it may seem,
              despite some surface similarities with FORREST GUMP. It's actually more of a
              feel-bad kind of film if you ask me. Or, as I put it to a friend: It's the
              film FORREST GUMP should have been. Not some self-congratulatory spectacle
              about "living your life to the fullest" but an epic of regret and longing
              about what happens when you don't.

              That music is *only* in the credits, and what a blessed thing that is, too.
              If there's one thing I hate, it's movies utilizing classical pieces that
              were already used much more notably in previous films. Same goes for pop
              songs, too, actually.

              -Bilge



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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