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Re: [terrencemalick] Did you know that..../doubleheader

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  • mhb5133
    Hi Angela, I prefer to think of him as the angel king , since he s always looking to the sky and he s the best. Glad to see that you weren t wiped out in that
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
      Hi Angela,

      I prefer to think of him as the "angel king", since he's always looking to the sky and he's the best. Glad to see that you weren't wiped out in that last batch of Kansas tornados. Any damage in your area?

      Bilge,

      I was looking over your Best Adaptations list in the latest issue of Bookforum. You're ten times the film historian I am. I lean toward contemporary Americana. I'd have to include Altman's excellent "Short Cuts", based on several Raymond Carver short stories. Altman's meshing of all those disparate narratives and moving "Carver country" (the setting of his stories) from the blue collar Pacific Northwest to LA were master strokes. Also loved "Affliction", Paul Schrader's take on a novel by the great Russell Banks. Right up there would be "The Sweet Hereafter", Atom Egoyan's masterpiece to date, based on a novel by, guess who, Russell Banks. And finally, I'd have to add to the list, "Away From Her" the very strong first directorial effort by Canadian actress Sarah Polley, based on a short story by fellow Canadian Alice Munro, which I know you're familiar with!

      All the best to you both, Oscar



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Angela Havel
      To: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 10:55 PM
      Subject: Re: [terrencemalick] Did you know that....


      Hi Agape:

      Cool. And how appropos that our duality genius' last name appears also to be derived from the Latin "mal" (bad).

      Ever the glass-half-empty viewer,
      Angela

      a_gapey <a_gapey@...> wrote:
      in Semitic languages, "malik" variably means "king" or "angel"?

      It's also a pretty common last name, which is why "Malick" as a search
      term on its own often gets more results for north African soccer
      players than Terrence Malick.

      Just thought everyone should now this :-)

      Agape

      ---------------------------------
      We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
      (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bilge Ebiri
      ... All good choices, except (in my opinion) for maybe AFFLICTION, which has always been a film I ve had difficulty liking, despite my fondness for all
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
        > Bilge,
        >
        > I was looking over your Best Adaptations list in the latest issue of
        > Bookforum. You're ten times the film historian I am. I lean toward
        > contemporary Americana. I'd have to include Altman's excellent "Short
        > Cuts", based on several Raymond Carver short stories. Altman's meshing of
        > all those disparate narratives and moving "Carver country" (the setting of
        > his stories) from the blue collar Pacific Northwest to LA were master
        > strokes. Also loved "Affliction", Paul Schrader's take on a novel by the
        > great Russell Banks. Right up there would be "The Sweet Hereafter", Atom
        > Egoyan's masterpiece to date, based on a novel by, guess who, Russell
        > Banks. And finally, I'd have to add to the list, "Away From Her" the very
        > strong first directorial effort by Canadian actress Sarah Polley, based on
        > a short story by fellow Canadian Alice Munro, which I know you're familiar
        > with!
        >


        All good choices, except (in my opinion) for maybe AFFLICTION, which has
        always been a film I've had difficulty liking, despite my fondness for all
        involved in it. (I really wanted Nolte to win that damned Oscar.) I was a
        bit hampered in the creation of my list because so many of my favorite films
        are, as luck would have it, adaptations. THE CONFORMIST, BARRY LYNDON, and
        THE LEOPARD are pretty much my top 3 of all time, and it'd be hard to make a
        list of five films of any sort and leave one of those off it. I also toyed
        with choosing Godard's CONTEMPT (another favorite) but decided against it
        for the simple fact that I never made it through the entire Moravia book. I
        chose THE CHOCOLATE WAR because I not only love the film to death but also
        because I had it on the mind, as it had just (belatedly) come out on DVD.
        And Branagh's HAMLET...I just have the fondest damned memories of it, an
        almost perfect adaptation of a play, for my money (and I tend to hate filmed
        theater...)

        Of course I considered including THE THIN RED LINE on that list, too --
        although, ultimately, that film feels less like an adaptation (as opposed to
        the screenplay, which is a quite faithful adaptation of it) and more of a
        dreamlike palimpsest of Jones's novel.

        SHORT CUTS is a good choice. I love that film. If you get a chance, try and
        take a look at the Australian film JINDABYNE (directed by Ray Lawrence, who
        also did LANTANA), now in theaters, which takes one of those same Carver
        stories ("So Much Water So Close to Home") and transposes it to a small
        community down under, turning it into something uniquely different. I'm not
        crazy about the film, and I think the seeming effortlessness of Altman's
        adaptation biases me somewhat (especially in relation to JINDABYNE, which at
        times is way too labored and precious for its own good), but it's still in
        many ways a fascinating film, and I think some Malick fans will dig it.

        -Bilge
      • vanvutu
        I think BARRY LYNDON is one of the most perfect films I have ever seen, and it is the only film I have watched more than THE THIN RED LINE. For some reason, it
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 4, 2007
          I think BARRY LYNDON is one of the most perfect films I have ever
          seen, and it is the only film I have watched more than THE THIN RED
          LINE. For some reason, it usually never gets mentioned on anyone's
          short list of favorite Kubrick films, but I think it is his finest
          film. So many great scenes, so many wonderful details....It is Ryan
          O'Neal's greatest role, and Marisa Berenson was absolutely *perfect*
          as Lady Lyndon. One of my many favorite scenes in the film is when
          Lord Bullingdon makes a scene by barging in on that Bach concert(
          with the angrogynous, effeminate, effete and precious Reverend Runt
          on the period flute and Lady Lyndon on the harpsichord). Young Brian
          is with him and wearing Bullingdon's shoes and going CLOP! CLOP!
          CLOP! CLOP! on the hardwood floor as he stomps down the aisle. The
          shot near the end of THE NEW WORLD of Rebecca's son running around
          with those sheep on the estate reminded me a great deal about young
          Brian in BARRY LYNDON. BARRY LYNDON is my vote for greatest film
          adaptation ever!

          By the way, I have yet to read any great professional film criticism
          on THE THIN RED LINE, but there is absolutely no shortage of great
          commentaries and analyses written on BARRY LYNDON. My favorite single
          piece appeared in The Kubrick Issue in Vol XXlX (2001): No. 4 of
          Literature/Film Quarterly.
        • Bilge Ebiri
          ... This may have been true once, but I think you may be pleasantly surprised now. Most Kubrick fans I know cite it as their favorite Kubrick film, if not
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 4, 2007
            >I think BARRY LYNDON is one of the most perfect films I have ever
            > seen, and it is the only film I have watched more than THE THIN RED
            > LINE. For some reason, it usually never gets mentioned on anyone's
            > short list of favorite Kubrick films, but I think it is his finest
            > film.

            This may have been true once, but I think you may be pleasantly surprised
            now. Most Kubrick fans I know cite it as their favorite Kubrick film, if not
            their favorite film of all time. (Trust me, I've been keeping score since
            1991.)

            For great insights on Barry Lyndon, you can do no better than Michel Ciment,
            both in his book on Kubrick and elsewhere, usually in the French journal
            Positif.

            Also, there are some interesting pieces here, including a couple of modest
            contributions from yours truly:
            http://www.visual-memory.co.uk/amk/index.html

            (For my part, after a recent NYC screening of a new print, I recently
            tallied how many times I've seen this film, and came up with this rather
            alarming number: 135!...Yes, there was a year in there when I watched Barry
            Lyndon at least once every week. I'm married now, so I've brought it down to
            about once a year.)

            -Bilge
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