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Journey to the Line [was Re: Carnivale]

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  • Andrew
    Tuan, That is the piece. I don t know it by name because (gasp!) I don t have that soundtrack in my collection, a problem that needs to be rectified
    Message 1 of 21 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Tuan,

      That is the piece. I don't know it by name because (gasp!) I don't
      have that soundtrack in my collection, a problem that needs to be
      rectified immediately if not sooner.

      Your insights to the design and usage of the piece by Malick are dead-
      on. It is used much the same way in CARNIVALE, although you don't
      realize it until you begin to watch Season 2.

      I always felt that "Ride of the Valkyries" in APOCALYPSE NOW had an
      ironic quality to it. The music is heroic, yet the onscreen visuals
      of a pack of attack helicopters mowing down a Vietnamese village
      seems anything but. You are right in that it fills you with the
      sense of elation that those soldiers no doubt felt as they swooped
      godlike down from the sky, but when I watch that sequence I can't
      help but also feel that sense of irony in the empty heroism of a
      vengeful massacre. A perfect choice of music, made for all the right
      reasons.

      Kudos to Coppola, but there are few directors (maybe none) as
      brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is. I bought all of
      Wagner's operas after seeing THE NEW WORLD because I wanted to better
      understand his use of DER RHEINGOLD in the film, as well as try to
      connect further with Malick's sensibilities by exploring what makes
      him tick.

      Regards,
      Andrew

      --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "vanvutu" <vanvutu@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Denny <xydeco95@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Interesting. It is the first time that I have heard it used
      > outside of TTRL, with the exception of a piece on The History
      > Channel, which made some sense.
      >
      > Andrew --
      >
      > I haven't seen any of CARNIVALE, but I'm guessing the particular
      > track from THE THIN RED LINE score you refer to was "Journey to the
      > Line," as Ebiri noted. It was also used for the trailer for that
      > crapfest called PEARL HARBOR.
      >
      > I love that wonderful "ticking" motif at the beginning and how it
      > builds and builds inexorably to that impassioned climax in the
      > cellos and the horns.
      >
      > In my opinion, it was used most effectively during the scene when
      > the Japanese bivouac was being overrun. As an aural counterpoint to
      > the carnage taking place onscreen, the music gives the sequence a
      > tremendous sense of tragedy. You don't cheer on the killing of the
      > enemy nor feel any kind of elation in this battle sequence.
      (Contrast
      > that to in APOCALYPSE NOW, where the high-octane music of Wagner's
      > Ride of the Valkyries was used during the famous helicopter attack
      > on that coastal village.)
      >
      > Tuan
      > Brother of the Cult, Fellow Holder of the Line
      >
    • vanvutu
      ... Andrew - Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called The Mop Up on the DVD),
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 7, 2006
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        > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few directors (maybe none) as
        > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.

        Andrew -

        Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during
        the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called "The Mop Up" on
        the DVD), Malick makes it even more so with the use of Charles
        Ives's THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, seamlessly inserted where the Zimmer
        score ends. It is heard beginning with Dale approaching with pliers
        menacingly over to the dying Japanese officer and ends with Dale
        reaching over to a nearby body to extract a gold tooth from the
        mouth of the corpse.

        Scored for solo trumpet, flutes, and strings, the piece has the
        trumpet posing the "question" with an angular, enigmatic theme, and
        the flutes providing the "answers." This is repeated a few times
        until the the trumpet poses its question one final time...but the
        flutes do not answer.

        The version heard in the film leaves out the flutes -- I guess to
        better mirror the Japanese officer's defiant statement, which is
        repeated over and over again to an uncomprehending Dale: "Kisama
        shinun dayo!"(roughly translated to mean, "Bastard, you too will
        die!"), and to give added poignancy to the scene.

        Anyway, what is significant in the Ives piece is that, even though
        the trumpet poses the question, it sounds bold, confident, sonorous.
        And while the flutes offer the answers, they sound puny, weak,
        effete by comparison. The sounds they make are gibberish.(It is
        interesting to compare this with Richard Strauss's tone poem EIN
        HELDENLEBEN -- especially in the Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony
        recording -- where after the powerful opening "Hero's Theme,"
        the "Hero's Critics" are represented by the puny woodwinds.)

        The lone wail of the trumpet through the universe (the carpet of
        strings over which it intones its question) represents the
        overarching questions of humanity. I see the flutes as all the
        competing religions and philosophies which try -- but ultimately
        fail -- in providing answers to the eternal mysteries....

        Tuan
      • Ian Harnarine
        Folks, I haven t been up with the list lately, so forgive me if these articles have already been mentioned. This one in the New York Times is about the
        Message 3 of 21 , Mar 7, 2006
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          Folks,

          I haven't been up with the list lately, so forgive me if these articles
          have already been mentioned.

          This one in the New York Times is about the linguist that helped Malick
          with the Native American dialects/languages. Good Read:
          http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/07/science/07lang.html


          There is a very very interesting piece in the latest Village Voice about
          The New World being the latest 'Cult Film'. I'm baffled by some of the
          stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it's at least a good read:
          http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0610,hoberman,72427,20.html

          regards,
          Ian
        • Andrew
          Tuan, As I don t have the TTRL soundtrack, I had assumed the Zimmer/Ives transition to be one piece. It just goes to show you that Malick is often even more
          Message 4 of 21 , Mar 8, 2006
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            Tuan,

            As I don't have the TTRL soundtrack, I had assumed the Zimmer/Ives
            transition to be one piece. It just goes to show you that Malick is
            often even more brilliant than one realizes. I will have to look at
            that scene tomorrow night when I have a chance.

            Obviously, I am not familiar with Ives. If I wanted to get a good
            sample of his style, what other works of his would you recommend?

            I am a bit more familiar with Strauss, as I seem to be most attracted
            to the German composers, but I have not heard EIN HELDENLEBEN
            either. Thank you for the recommendation. It will be an interesting
            mental exercise to compare the Strauss and Ives works.

            It is tragic that classical music is so underappreciated in the
            modern age. These guys were artists on the grandest scale.

            Thanks for the recommendations. I will hopefully provide you some
            dialogue on them when I am able.

            Regards,
            Andrew

            --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "vanvutu" <vanvutu@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few directors (maybe none) as
            > > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.
            >
            > Andrew -
            >
            > Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during
            > the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called "The Mop Up" on
            > the DVD), Malick makes it even more so with the use of Charles
            > Ives's THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, seamlessly inserted where the
            Zimmer
            > score ends. It is heard beginning with Dale approaching with pliers
            > menacingly over to the dying Japanese officer and ends with Dale
            > reaching over to a nearby body to extract a gold tooth from the
            > mouth of the corpse.
            >
            > Scored for solo trumpet, flutes, and strings, the piece has the
            > trumpet posing the "question" with an angular, enigmatic theme, and
            > the flutes providing the "answers." This is repeated a few times
            > until the the trumpet poses its question one final time...but the
            > flutes do not answer.
            >
            > The version heard in the film leaves out the flutes -- I guess to
            > better mirror the Japanese officer's defiant statement, which is
            > repeated over and over again to an uncomprehending Dale: "Kisama
            > shinun dayo!"(roughly translated to mean, "Bastard, you too will
            > die!"), and to give added poignancy to the scene.
            >
            > Anyway, what is significant in the Ives piece is that, even though
            > the trumpet poses the question, it sounds bold, confident,
            sonorous.
            > And while the flutes offer the answers, they sound puny, weak,
            > effete by comparison. The sounds they make are gibberish.(It is
            > interesting to compare this with Richard Strauss's tone poem EIN
            > HELDENLEBEN -- especially in the Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony
            > recording -- where after the powerful opening "Hero's Theme,"
            > the "Hero's Critics" are represented by the puny woodwinds.)
            >
            > The lone wail of the trumpet through the universe (the carpet of
            > strings over which it intones its question) represents the
            > overarching questions of humanity. I see the flutes as all the
            > competing religions and philosophies which try -- but ultimately
            > fail -- in providing answers to the eternal mysteries....
            >
            > Tuan
            >
          • Angela Havel
            Hi: Wow, I have renewed respect for the trumpet as an orchestral instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course in interpreting classical
            Message 5 of 21 , Mar 8, 2006
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              Hi:

              Wow, I have renewed respect for the trumpet as an orchestral instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course in interpreting classical music. And I'm sure Malick is as detailed in matching the music to the action as you are in your observation of how that music works to enhance the action.

              This is off-topic, but have you ever experienced the sublimity of Ralph Vaughan Williams "The Lark Ascending"? I would love to hear what you or anyone else has to say about that piece. Its genius in craftsmanship reminds me of Malick.

              Angela

              vanvutu <vanvutu@...> wrote: > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few directors (maybe none) as
              > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.

              Andrew -

              Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during
              the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called "The Mop Up" on
              the DVD), Malick makes it even more so with the use of Charles
              Ives's THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, seamlessly inserted where the Zimmer
              score ends. It is heard beginning with Dale approaching with pliers
              menacingly over to the dying Japanese officer and ends with Dale
              reaching over to a nearby body to extract a gold tooth from the
              mouth of the corpse.

              Scored for solo trumpet, flutes, and strings, the piece has the
              trumpet posing the "question" with an angular, enigmatic theme, and
              the flutes providing the "answers." This is repeated a few times
              until the the trumpet poses its question one final time...but the
              flutes do not answer.

              The version heard in the film leaves out the flutes -- I guess to
              better mirror the Japanese officer's defiant statement, which is
              repeated over and over again to an uncomprehending Dale: "Kisama
              shinun dayo!"(roughly translated to mean, "Bastard, you too will
              die!"), and to give added poignancy to the scene.

              Anyway, what is significant in the Ives piece is that, even though
              the trumpet poses the question, it sounds bold, confident, sonorous.
              And while the flutes offer the answers, they sound puny, weak,
              effete by comparison. The sounds they make are gibberish.(It is
              interesting to compare this with Richard Strauss's tone poem EIN
              HELDENLEBEN -- especially in the Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony
              recording -- where after the powerful opening "Hero's Theme,"
              the "Hero's Critics" are represented by the puny woodwinds.)

              The lone wail of the trumpet through the universe (the carpet of
              strings over which it intones its question) represents the
              overarching questions of humanity. I see the flutes as all the
              competing religions and philosophies which try -- but ultimately
              fail -- in providing answers to the eternal mysteries....

              Tuan







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            • Andrew
              Tuan, I bought the Bernstein/NY Philharmonic version of THE UNANSWERED QUESTION and the Reiner/Chicago Symphony version of EIN HELDENLEBEN yesterday on my
              Message 6 of 21 , Mar 9, 2006
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                Tuan,

                I bought the Bernstein/NY Philharmonic version of THE UNANSWERED
                QUESTION and the Reiner/Chicago Symphony version of EIN HELDENLEBEN
                yesterday on my lunch break and listened to them as I sat in my car,
                then listened to them again today on my way to work.

                My first impression of EIN HELDENLEBEN was not impressive, and I
                considered THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA (speaking of great use of classical
                music in film) a far better piece. Upon first hearing it, I was put
                off by the overt romanticism, though I felt that the villan's
                movement was so ridiculous that perhaps Strauss was satirizing the
                Romantics, a la Shaw. However, listening to it this morning softened
                my criticism a bit. The bass sounds of the oboes, bassoons, and
                horns are much more ominous in the villan's movement than my first
                impression, though the woodwinds are still ridiculous (intentionally,
                I'm sure). This piece would work well in a tongue-in-cheek horror
                film like SANTA'S KILLER DWARVES! ;0

                THE UNANSWERED QUESTION is quite a piece, indeed. Ives' own program
                on the piece confirms your ideas of it, but I had a bit different
                impression based solely on listening to the work. The strings
                persist for over a full minute into the piece, which to me is
                indicative of eternity (and God in it). Then the trumpet poses the
                question for the first time. The first response from the woodwinds
                is soft and murmured. Then, each time the trumpet poses the
                question, the responses become louder, more shrill, and more
                cacaphonus, as well as more defiant. The piece brought to mind a
                father standing before trembling children and asking for an
                explanation, a question to which the answer is often "It wasn't my
                fault! He did it! It wasn't me!," etc. Children often come to defy
                their fathers with age, as they do in this piece, but the question
                remains unanswered because the respondents are unwilling to face the
                truth. My impression of the work is possibly colored by its use in
                TTRL, with God posing the question to mankind, and only being
                answered by lies, excuses, and defiance.

                Comparing the use of this technique (puny woodwinds representing the
                respondents) in both pieces, I feel that Ives' use is much more
                powerful. I can not shake the feeling that the Strauss work is at
                least in part satirical, though the composition does create a sense
                of peril as well as consider the Machiavellian plotting of the villan
                (s). Strauss' villans seem like the guys from HOME ALONE, while
                Ives' intention with the technique is much different.

                On a side note, Ives' CENTRAL PARK IN THE DARK (on the same album) is
                a great piece. It is no wonder that Malick has an affinity for Ives,
                considering that this piece has many of the same thematics as TNW in
                its embrace of a more "natural" civilization.

                Regards,
                Andrew

                --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "vanvutu" <vanvutu@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few directors (maybe none) as
                > > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.
                >
                > Andrew -
                >
                > Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during
                > the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called "The Mop Up" on
                > the DVD), Malick makes it even more so with the use of Charles
                > Ives's THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, seamlessly inserted where the
                Zimmer
                > score ends. It is heard beginning with Dale approaching with pliers
                > menacingly over to the dying Japanese officer and ends with Dale
                > reaching over to a nearby body to extract a gold tooth from the
                > mouth of the corpse.
                >
                > Scored for solo trumpet, flutes, and strings, the piece has the
                > trumpet posing the "question" with an angular, enigmatic theme, and
                > the flutes providing the "answers." This is repeated a few times
                > until the the trumpet poses its question one final time...but the
                > flutes do not answer.
                >
                > The version heard in the film leaves out the flutes -- I guess to
                > better mirror the Japanese officer's defiant statement, which is
                > repeated over and over again to an uncomprehending Dale: "Kisama
                > shinun dayo!"(roughly translated to mean, "Bastard, you too will
                > die!"), and to give added poignancy to the scene.
                >
                > Anyway, what is significant in the Ives piece is that, even though
                > the trumpet poses the question, it sounds bold, confident,
                sonorous.
                > And while the flutes offer the answers, they sound puny, weak,
                > effete by comparison. The sounds they make are gibberish.(It is
                > interesting to compare this with Richard Strauss's tone poem EIN
                > HELDENLEBEN -- especially in the Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony
                > recording -- where after the powerful opening "Hero's Theme,"
                > the "Hero's Critics" are represented by the puny woodwinds.)
                >
                > The lone wail of the trumpet through the universe (the carpet of
                > strings over which it intones its question) represents the
                > overarching questions of humanity. I see the flutes as all the
                > competing religions and philosophies which try -- but ultimately
                > fail -- in providing answers to the eternal mysteries....
                >
                > Tuan
                >
              • Andrew
                I ll have to get back to you next week on that one. I m out of money! :) Regards, Andrew ... instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course
                Message 7 of 21 , Mar 9, 2006
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                  I'll have to get back to you next week on that one. I'm out of
                  money! :)

                  Regards,
                  Andrew

                  --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Angela Havel <anghave@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi:
                  >
                  > Wow, I have renewed respect for the trumpet as an orchestral
                  instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course in
                  interpreting classical music. And I'm sure Malick is as detailed in
                  matching the music to the action as you are in your observation of
                  how that music works to enhance the action.
                  >
                  > This is off-topic, but have you ever experienced the sublimity of
                  Ralph Vaughan Williams "The Lark Ascending"? I would love to hear
                  what you or anyone else has to say about that piece. Its genius in
                  craftsmanship reminds me of Malick.
                  >
                  > Angela
                  >
                  > vanvutu <vanvutu@...> wrote: > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few
                  directors (maybe none) as
                  > > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.
                  >
                  > Andrew -
                  >
                  > Thank you for your reply. As amazing as that musical cue is during
                  > the Japanese bivouac sequence(the chapter called "The Mop Up" on
                  > the DVD), Malick makes it even more so with the use of Charles
                  > Ives's THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, seamlessly inserted where the
                  Zimmer
                  > score ends. It is heard beginning with Dale approaching with pliers
                  > menacingly over to the dying Japanese officer and ends with Dale
                  > reaching over to a nearby body to extract a gold tooth from the
                  > mouth of the corpse.
                  >
                  > Scored for solo trumpet, flutes, and strings, the piece has the
                  > trumpet posing the "question" with an angular, enigmatic theme, and
                  > the flutes providing the "answers." This is repeated a few times
                  > until the the trumpet poses its question one final time...but the
                  > flutes do not answer.
                  >
                  > The version heard in the film leaves out the flutes -- I guess to
                  > better mirror the Japanese officer's defiant statement, which is
                  > repeated over and over again to an uncomprehending Dale: "Kisama
                  > shinun dayo!"(roughly translated to mean, "Bastard, you too will
                  > die!"), and to give added poignancy to the scene.
                  >
                  > Anyway, what is significant in the Ives piece is that, even though
                  > the trumpet poses the question, it sounds bold, confident,
                  sonorous.
                  > And while the flutes offer the answers, they sound puny, weak,
                  > effete by comparison. The sounds they make are gibberish.(It is
                  > interesting to compare this with Richard Strauss's tone poem EIN
                  > HELDENLEBEN -- especially in the Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony
                  > recording -- where after the powerful opening "Hero's Theme,"
                  > the "Hero's Critics" are represented by the puny woodwinds.)
                  >
                  > The lone wail of the trumpet through the universe (the carpet of
                  > strings over which it intones its question) represents the
                  > overarching questions of humanity. I see the flutes as all the
                  > competing religions and philosophies which try -- but ultimately
                  > fail -- in providing answers to the eternal mysteries....
                  >
                  > Tuan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Community email addresses:
                  > Post message: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subscribe: terrencemalick-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Angela Havel
                  ... I liked the second article especially. Maybe there s hope for us yet. Angela ... http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/07/science/07lang.html ...
                  Message 8 of 21 , Mar 9, 2006
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                    --- Ian:

                    I liked the second article especially. Maybe there's
                    hope for us yet.

                    Angela

                    Harnarine <iankh@...> wrote:

                    > Folks,
                    >
                    > I haven't been up with the list lately, so forgive
                    > me if these articles
                    > have already been mentioned.
                    >
                    > This one in the New York Times is about the linguist
                    > that helped Malick
                    > with the Native American dialects/languages. Good
                    > Read:
                    >
                    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/07/science/07lang.html
                    >
                    >
                    > There is a very very interesting piece in the latest
                    > Village Voice about
                    > The New World being the latest 'Cult Film'. I'm
                    > baffled by some of the
                    > stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it's at least
                    > a good read:
                    >
                    http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0610,hoberman,72427,20.html
                    >
                    > regards,
                    > Ian
                    >
                    >
                    > Community email addresses:
                    > Post message: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
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                    > terrencemalick-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                    >
                    > terrencemalick-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                    >
                    >
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                    >


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                  • a_gapey
                    ... about The New World being the latest Cult Film . I m baffled by some of the stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it s at least a ... Thanks for the
                    Message 9 of 21 , Mar 11, 2006
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                      --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Ian Harnarine <iankh@...>
                      wrote:
                      > There is a very very interesting piece in the latest Village Voice
                      about> The New World being the latest 'Cult Film'. I'm baffled by
                      some of the stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it's at least a
                      good read:
                      > http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0610,hoberman,72427,20.html
                      > regards,
                      > Ian

                      Thanks for the articles, Ian. I was in hysterics when I read this bit
                      in the article by J. Hoberman of the Village Voice: "Where other
                      movies have fans, Malick's produces disciples. Even holy relics: 'On
                      my desk beside my keyboard,' wrote Seitz, 'lies one of my most prized
                      possessions: a ticket stub from the January 21, 9:30 p.m. showing of
                      The New World at BAM-Rose Cinemas in downtown Brooklyn.'"

                      I admit it - I am definitely a Malick devotee, and the time I've
                      spent searching for and saving information and opinions on TNW
                      without having seen it yet surely qualifies me as such. But saving
                      the ticket-stubs from showings of his films as relics does seem a tad
                      obsessive. ;-) Has anyone here ever done anything like that?

                      This all reminds me of what the Swami Vivekananda has to say on
                      religion: "You must bear in mind that religion does not consist in
                      talk, or doctrines, or books, but in realisation; it is not learning
                      but being. Man must realise God, feel God, see God, talk of God. That
                      is religion." Sounds to me like that's also being a
                      Malick "disciple", n'est-ce pas mes amis ;-) ?

                      In fact, another Swami - Dayatmananda by name - could well be have
                      been describing what happens to us from our very first Malick
                      film: "Man's attention is naturally directed first towards the
                      object; it is only late in life that he learns to direct his
                      attention within and notice the subject. It is for this reason that
                      the path of devotion places before the devotee an object that
                      attracts him. This attraction seems to be spontaneous and guides the
                      devotee further along the path. As he goes on practising the
                      devotional disciplines his mind becomes focussed on the object of his
                      devotion more and more until his whole mind gets occupied with it
                      without much difficulty. In the path of devotion there is no great
                      strain because there is no attempt to go against the grain." You see?
                      We ARE disciples! Watching our favourite Malick flicks over and over
                      again is merely a form of "sadhana" or "spiritual practice" (he,he).
                      Ah, the man's films are just good for the soul.....

                      - Agape
                    • Angela Havel
                      Hi: I still have my ticket stub from TNW in my wallet. : ) The only way I d admit to being a disciple of any living person (other than Jesus) is if I know the
                      Message 10 of 21 , Mar 11, 2006
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                        Hi:

                        I still have my ticket stub from TNW in my wallet. : )

                        The only way I'd admit to being a disciple of any living person (other than Jesus) is if I know the guru doesn't give a whit whether or not he/she gathers disciples. I don't think Malick gives a whit! (Or rather, he's a reluctant/ambivalent guru--or maybe doesn't fully realize the level of devotion of his fans).

                        I like the "path of devotion" quote. A religion that doesn't feel like a religion is certainly attractive to people who've always felt somehow let down by the traditional religions, as I have.

                        I'm excited for you to finally see TNW, Agape!

                        Angela

                        a_gapey <a_gapey@...> wrote: --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Ian Harnarine
                        wrote:
                        > There is a very very interesting piece in the latest Village Voice
                        about> The New World being the latest 'Cult Film'. I'm baffled by
                        some of the stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it's at least a
                        good read:
                        > http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0610,hoberman,72427,20.html
                        > regards,
                        > Ian

                        Thanks for the articles, Ian. I was in hysterics when I read this bit
                        in the article by J. Hoberman of the Village Voice: "Where other
                        movies have fans, Malick's produces disciples. Even holy relics: 'On
                        my desk beside my keyboard,' wrote Seitz, 'lies one of my most prized
                        possessions: a ticket stub from the January 21, 9:30 p.m. showing of
                        The New World at BAM-Rose Cinemas in downtown Brooklyn.'"

                        I admit it - I am definitely a Malick devotee, and the time I've
                        spent searching for and saving information and opinions on TNW
                        without having seen it yet surely qualifies me as such. But saving
                        the ticket-stubs from showings of his films as relics does seem a tad
                        obsessive. ;-) Has anyone here ever done anything like that?

                        This all reminds me of what the Swami Vivekananda has to say on
                        religion: "You must bear in mind that religion does not consist in
                        talk, or doctrines, or books, but in realisation; it is not learning
                        but being. Man must realise God, feel God, see God, talk of God. That
                        is religion." Sounds to me like that's also being a
                        Malick "disciple", n'est-ce pas mes amis ;-) ?

                        In fact, another Swami - Dayatmananda by name - could well be have
                        been describing what happens to us from our very first Malick
                        film: "Man's attention is naturally directed first towards the
                        object; it is only late in life that he learns to direct his
                        attention within and notice the subject. It is for this reason that
                        the path of devotion places before the devotee an object that
                        attracts him. This attraction seems to be spontaneous and guides the
                        devotee further along the path. As he goes on practising the
                        devotional disciplines his mind becomes focussed on the object of his
                        devotion more and more until his whole mind gets occupied with it
                        without much difficulty. In the path of devotion there is no great
                        strain because there is no attempt to go against the grain." You see?
                        We ARE disciples! Watching our favourite Malick flicks over and over
                        again is merely a form of "sadhana" or "spiritual practice" (he,he).
                        Ah, the man's films are just good for the soul.....

                        - Agape







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                      • a_gapey
                        Angela, I KNEW you would have saved yours - lol! Maybe I should too (just two weeks to go!!!). Then we can make like geeks, admiring and coveting each other s
                        Message 11 of 21 , Mar 12, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Angela,
                          I KNEW you would have saved yours - lol! Maybe I should too (just two
                          weeks to go!!!). Then we can make like geeks, admiring and coveting
                          each other's precious ticket stubs with true fanboy fervour:
                          - Well, MY ticket stub is from the showing of the LONG version.
                          - Yeah, but MINE is from the showing of the long version BEFORE 1
                          January!
                          - Big effen deal - MINE is from the showing when MALICK was there for
                          the Q&A!! Nya, nya, nya..

                          I also wonder if Malick is aware of the deep impact his work has on
                          those who are put together in such a way as to be sensitive to it.
                          The effect of his films on such a viewer at the right time and place
                          is much more akin to rapture than any other experience I know. I
                          suspect that what he's trying to create in the editing room while
                          mixing and matching images, music, dialogue and voice-overs, is
                          something that makes HIM feel that rapture. I'm just so happy that
                          major American studios are still willing to throw piles of money in
                          his general direction so he can share his private epiphanies with us
                          on the big screen.

                          - Agape

                          --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Angela Havel <anghave@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi:
                          >
                          > I still have my ticket stub from TNW in my wallet. : )
                          >
                          > The only way I'd admit to being a disciple of any living person
                          (other than Jesus) is if I know the guru doesn't give a whit whether
                          or not he/she gathers disciples. I don't think Malick gives a whit!
                          (Or rather, he's a reluctant/ambivalent guru--or maybe doesn't fully
                          realize the level of devotion of his fans).
                          >
                          > I like the "path of devotion" quote. A religion that doesn't feel
                          like a religion is certainly attractive to people who've always felt
                          somehow let down by the traditional religions, as I have.
                          >
                          > I'm excited for you to finally see TNW, Agape!
                          >
                          > Angela
                          >
                          > a_gapey <a_gapey@...> wrote: --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com,
                          Ian Harnarine
                          > wrote:
                          > > There is a very very interesting piece in the latest Village
                          Voice
                          > about> The New World being the latest 'Cult Film'. I'm baffled by
                          > some of the stuff mentioned, but needless to say...it's at least a
                          > good read:
                          > > http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0610,hoberman,72427,20.html
                          > > regards,
                          > > Ian
                          >
                          > Thanks for the articles, Ian. I was in hysterics when I read this
                          bit
                          > in the article by J. Hoberman of the Village Voice: "Where other
                          > movies have fans, Malick's produces disciples. Even holy
                          relics: 'On
                          > my desk beside my keyboard,' wrote Seitz, 'lies one of my most
                          prized
                          > possessions: a ticket stub from the January 21, 9:30 p.m. showing
                          of
                          > The New World at BAM-Rose Cinemas in downtown Brooklyn.'"
                          >
                          > I admit it - I am definitely a Malick devotee, and the time I've
                          > spent searching for and saving information and opinions on TNW
                          > without having seen it yet surely qualifies me as such. But saving
                          > the ticket-stubs from showings of his films as relics does seem a
                          tad
                          > obsessive. ;-) Has anyone here ever done anything like that?
                          >
                          > This all reminds me of what the Swami Vivekananda has to say on
                          > religion: "You must bear in mind that religion does not consist in
                          > talk, or doctrines, or books, but in realisation; it is not
                          learning
                          > but being. Man must realise God, feel God, see God, talk of God.
                          That
                          > is religion." Sounds to me like that's also being a
                          > Malick "disciple", n'est-ce pas mes amis ;-) ?
                          >
                          > In fact, another Swami - Dayatmananda by name - could well be have
                          > been describing what happens to us from our very first Malick
                          > film: "Man's attention is naturally directed first towards the
                          > object; it is only late in life that he learns to direct his
                          > attention within and notice the subject. It is for this reason that
                          > the path of devotion places before the devotee an object that
                          > attracts him. This attraction seems to be spontaneous and guides
                          the
                          > devotee further along the path. As he goes on practising the
                          > devotional disciplines his mind becomes focussed on the object of
                          his
                          > devotion more and more until his whole mind gets occupied with it
                          > without much difficulty. In the path of devotion there is no great
                          > strain because there is no attempt to go against the grain." You
                          see?
                          > We ARE disciples! Watching our favourite Malick flicks over and
                          over
                          > again is merely a form of "sadhana" or "spiritual practice"
                          (he,he).
                          > Ah, the man's films are just good for the soul.....
                          >
                          > - Agape
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Community email addresses:
                          > Post message: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subscribe: terrencemalick-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          > Unsubscribe: terrencemalick-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          > List owner: terrencemalick-owner@yahoogroups.com
                          >
                          > Shortcut URL to this page:
                          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/terrencemalick
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ---------------------------------
                          > Brings words and photos together (easily) with
                          > PhotoMail - it's free and works with Yahoo! Mail.
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                        • vanvutu
                          Andrew - It s great that you went out and bought both the Ives and Strauss works (even if I mentioned the latter only in passing). You even managed to get one
                          Message 12 of 21 , Mar 13, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Andrew -

                            It's great that you went out and bought both the Ives and Strauss
                            works (even if I mentioned the latter only in passing). You even
                            managed to get one of the more famous versions of THE UNANSWERED
                            QUESTION, too. I had the opportunity to hear it performed live once.
                            It was the first work in the program, and the entire concert hall
                            was completely dark (save for the exit signs). It was wonderful to
                            hear the opening strings in the darkness. The strings were
                            *somewhere* around the stage, but you never saw them, and they only
                            lit up the trumpet soloist and the woodwinds, and only when they
                            played their respective parts. Very artsy.

                            Thank you for sharing your opinions on Strauss's EIN HELDENLEBEN.
                            What's ironic is that Strauss's musical language was considered
                            revolutionary when he first appeared on the scene; but by the time
                            he died, his style was considered conservative. Your being initially
                            put off by the "overt romanticism" of the work was also ironic,
                            given that the recording you heard was the Reiner/Chicago Symphony
                            Orchestra. Reiner's detractors always like to say how he's more
                            about balance and the "architecture," and how his interpretations,
                            while always exciting (though I would say "electrifying"), are
                            lacking in warmth. Anyway, I completely disagree with his
                            detractors. Other superlative Reiner/Chicago Symphony Orchestra
                            recordings I love:

                            BARTOK: Concerto for Orchestra/Music for Celesta, Percussion, and
                            Strings/Hungarian Sketches

                            BEETHOVEN: Symphonies 5 and 7

                            RESPIGHI: The Pines of Rome (The offstage trumpet solo over the
                            strings in the second movement made me shed tears of joy the first
                            time this recording, and the playing of the final movement has never
                            been surpassed.)

                            Yes, ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA is a wonderful piece, and the Reiner
                            recording makes it especially so. The only other recording of it I
                            love more is the Ormandy/Philadelphia Orchestra one. Kubrick made
                            the perfect choice when he decided to use the tone poem in 2001: A
                            SPACE ODYSSEY, given the inspiration for the musical work and the
                            themes of the film. Strauss (himself inspired by Nietzsche in
                            composing the work) wrote: "I mean to convey in music an idea of the
                            evolution of the human race from its origin, through the various
                            phases of development, religious as well as scientific, up to
                            Nietzsche's idea of the Ubermensch."

                            My favorite Strauss tone poem would have to be DEATH AND
                            TRANSFIGURATION. He quoted it both in the "The Hero's Work's of
                            Peace" section of EIN HELDENLEBEN, as well as in the end of "Im
                            Abendrot," the final song from his valedictory FOUR LAST SONGS (and
                            no finer version exists than the 1965 Schwarzkopf/Szell recording).
                            This amazing "Transfiguration" theme was also used by John Williams
                            in his score for SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE with Christopher Reeve. You
                            hear it in that night-time sequence when Superman takes Lois flying
                            over Metropolis/New York City and through Lois's "Can You Read My
                            Mind" voice-over.

                            You might also appreciate METAMORPHOSEN (Study for 23 Solo Srings),
                            which Strauss wrote in response to the Allied bombing of his native
                            Dresden.

                            I enjoyed reading your ideas on THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, though I
                            never saw "God" as the one posing the question to humankind. I agree
                            with you, however, in that the strings is "indicative of eternity
                            (and God in it)." It is the background against which the existential
                            drama of the trumpet and the flutes are unfolding but which is
                            indifferent to it at the same time. Translated to THE THIN RED LINE,
                            I see it as the cathedral of Nature that is Guadalcanal. I can never
                            forget the first time I saw the men make that long trek through the
                            jungle, how they passed one indigenous elderly man going the
                            opposite direction and who doesn't even seem to notice them. The
                            armies fighting for Hill 210 may as well as be ants fighting over an
                            anthill.(And in the context of the vast cosmos, the battle has even
                            lesser significance.) And at the end, when Witt is at the river and
                            is shortly about to die, he looks up at those fruit bats in the
                            tree; they're just hanging there upside down, a whole tree covered
                            with them. For him, it's one of the last precious images of this
                            world he will see, but what do those bats care whether he lives or
                            dies?

                            Tuan






                            --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <xydeco95@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Tuan,
                            >
                            > I bought the Bernstein/NY Philharmonic version of THE UNANSWERED
                            > QUESTION and the Reiner/Chicago Symphony version of EIN
                            HELDENLEBEN
                            > yesterday on my lunch break and listened to them as I sat in my
                            car,
                            > then listened to them again today on my way to work.
                            >
                            > My first impression of EIN HELDENLEBEN was not impressive, and I
                            > considered THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA (speaking of great use of
                            classical
                            > music in film) a far better piece. Upon first hearing it, I was
                            put
                            > off by the overt romanticism, though I felt that the villan's
                            > movement was so ridiculous that perhaps Strauss was satirizing the
                            > Romantics, a la Shaw. However, listening to it this morning
                            softened
                            > my criticism a bit. The bass sounds of the oboes, bassoons, and
                            > horns are much more ominous in the villan's movement than my first
                            > impression, though the woodwinds are still ridiculous
                            (intentionally,
                            > I'm sure). This piece would work well in a tongue-in-cheek horror
                            > film like SANTA'S KILLER DWARVES! ;0
                            >
                            > THE UNANSWERED QUESTION is quite a piece, indeed. Ives' own
                            program
                            > on the piece confirms your ideas of it, but I had a bit different
                            > impression based solely on listening to the work. The strings
                            > persist for over a full minute into the piece, which to me is
                            > indicative of eternity (and God in it). Then the trumpet poses
                            the
                            > question for the first time. The first response from the
                            woodwinds
                            > is soft and murmured. Then, each time the trumpet poses the
                            > question, the responses become louder, more shrill, and more
                            > cacaphonus, as well as more defiant. The piece brought to mind a
                            > father standing before trembling children and asking for an
                            > explanation, a question to which the answer is often "It wasn't my
                            > fault! He did it! It wasn't me!," etc. Children often come to
                            defy
                            > their fathers with age, as they do in this piece, but the question
                            > remains unanswered because the respondents are unwilling to face
                            the
                            > truth. My impression of the work is possibly colored by its use
                            in
                            > TTRL, with God posing the question to mankind, and only being
                            > answered by lies, excuses, and defiance.
                            >
                            > Comparing the use of this technique (puny woodwinds representing
                            the
                            > respondents) in both pieces, I feel that Ives' use is much more
                            > powerful. I can not shake the feeling that the Strauss work is at
                            > least in part satirical, though the composition does create a
                            sense
                            > of peril as well as consider the Machiavellian plotting of the
                            villan
                            > (s). Strauss' villans seem like the guys from HOME ALONE, while
                            > Ives' intention with the technique is much different.
                            >
                            > On a side note, Ives' CENTRAL PARK IN THE DARK (on the same album)
                            is
                            > a great piece. It is no wonder that Malick has an affinity for
                            Ives,
                            > considering that this piece has many of the same thematics as TNW
                            in
                            > its embrace of a more "natural" civilization.
                            >
                            > Regards,
                            > Andrew
                            >
                          • vanvutu
                            Angela - Thank you for your comments. THE LARK ASCENDING is a beautiful piece, but I must confess its beauty has never touched me. Ralph Vaughan Williams s
                            Message 13 of 21 , Mar 13, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Angela -

                              Thank you for your comments. THE LARK ASCENDING is a beautiful
                              piece, but I must confess its beauty has never touched me. Ralph
                              Vaughan Williams's rarely performed/recorded FIVE VARIANTS OF DIVES
                              AND LAZARUS is a very different story, with the aching atmospheric
                              opening, the exquisite violin solo, and the great climax in the
                              strings. A magnificent piece.

                              Tuan


                              --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Angela Havel <anghave@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi:
                              >
                              > Wow, I have renewed respect for the trumpet as an orchestral
                              instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course in
                              interpreting classical music. And I'm sure Malick is as detailed in
                              matching the music to the action as you are in your observation of
                              how that music works to enhance the action.
                              >
                              > This is off-topic, but have you ever experienced the sublimity of
                              Ralph Vaughan Williams "The Lark Ascending"? I would love to hear
                              what you or anyone else has to say about that piece. Its genius in
                              craftsmanship reminds me of Malick.
                              >
                              > Angela
                              >
                              > vanvutu <vanvutu@...> wrote: > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few
                              directors (maybe none) as
                              > > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.
                              >
                            • Andrew
                              Tuan, Thank you for more wonderful comments. I suspect that you are trying to drive me into debt, because I am interested in learning more about some of the
                              Message 14 of 21 , Mar 13, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Tuan,

                                Thank you for more wonderful comments. I suspect that you are trying
                                to drive me into debt, because I am interested in learning more about
                                some of the pieces/artists you mention. ;0

                                Interesting point on the Reiner recording of EIN HELDENLEBEN. I
                                suspect that the "overt romanticism" was more a function of Strauss'
                                composition than Reiner's conducting. I will give his DEATH AND
                                TRANSFIGURATION a try, and especially look forward to METAMORPHOSEN
                                as I am a sucker for strings.

                                The interesting thing about my own impressions of THE UNANSWERED
                                QUESTION to me is that I had it completely backward from it's
                                intention. Carrying over from that, I think that either way you look
                                at it as applied to THE THIN RED LINE, you still get to the same
                                place, which is doubly interesting. Considering the inevitable
                                conundrum that Malick must face trying to match his religious and
                                philosophical beliefs, I would love to hear his thoughts on it.

                                THE THIN RED LINE is such a great film, that you could pick almost
                                any image and scene out of it and have a lengthy discussion about its
                                implications. Such is the genius of the film maker that all of us
                                here love so much.

                                Regards,
                                Andrew

                                --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "vanvutu" <vanvutu@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Andrew -
                                >
                                > It's great that you went out and bought both the Ives and Strauss
                                > works (even if I mentioned the latter only in passing). You even
                                > managed to get one of the more famous versions of THE UNANSWERED
                                > QUESTION, too. I had the opportunity to hear it performed live
                                once.
                                > It was the first work in the program, and the entire concert hall
                                > was completely dark (save for the exit signs). It was wonderful to
                                > hear the opening strings in the darkness. The strings were
                                > *somewhere* around the stage, but you never saw them, and they only
                                > lit up the trumpet soloist and the woodwinds, and only when they
                                > played their respective parts. Very artsy.
                                >
                                > Thank you for sharing your opinions on Strauss's EIN HELDENLEBEN.
                                > What's ironic is that Strauss's musical language was considered
                                > revolutionary when he first appeared on the scene; but by the time
                                > he died, his style was considered conservative. Your being
                                initially
                                > put off by the "overt romanticism" of the work was also ironic,
                                > given that the recording you heard was the Reiner/Chicago Symphony
                                > Orchestra. Reiner's detractors always like to say how he's more
                                > about balance and the "architecture," and how his interpretations,
                                > while always exciting (though I would say "electrifying"), are
                                > lacking in warmth. Anyway, I completely disagree with his
                                > detractors. Other superlative Reiner/Chicago Symphony Orchestra
                                > recordings I love:
                                >
                                > BARTOK: Concerto for Orchestra/Music for Celesta, Percussion, and
                                > Strings/Hungarian Sketches
                                >
                                > BEETHOVEN: Symphonies 5 and 7
                                >
                                > RESPIGHI: The Pines of Rome (The offstage trumpet solo over the
                                > strings in the second movement made me shed tears of joy the first
                                > time this recording, and the playing of the final movement has
                                never
                                > been surpassed.)
                                >
                                > Yes, ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA is a wonderful piece, and the Reiner
                                > recording makes it especially so. The only other recording of it I
                                > love more is the Ormandy/Philadelphia Orchestra one. Kubrick made
                                > the perfect choice when he decided to use the tone poem in 2001: A
                                > SPACE ODYSSEY, given the inspiration for the musical work and the
                                > themes of the film. Strauss (himself inspired by Nietzsche in
                                > composing the work) wrote: "I mean to convey in music an idea of
                                the
                                > evolution of the human race from its origin, through the various
                                > phases of development, religious as well as scientific, up to
                                > Nietzsche's idea of the Ubermensch."
                                >
                                > My favorite Strauss tone poem would have to be DEATH AND
                                > TRANSFIGURATION. He quoted it both in the "The Hero's Work's of
                                > Peace" section of EIN HELDENLEBEN, as well as in the end of "Im
                                > Abendrot," the final song from his valedictory FOUR LAST SONGS (and
                                > no finer version exists than the 1965 Schwarzkopf/Szell recording).
                                > This amazing "Transfiguration" theme was also used by John Williams
                                > in his score for SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE with Christopher Reeve. You
                                > hear it in that night-time sequence when Superman takes Lois flying
                                > over Metropolis/New York City and through Lois's "Can You Read My
                                > Mind" voice-over.
                                >
                                > You might also appreciate METAMORPHOSEN (Study for 23 Solo Srings),
                                > which Strauss wrote in response to the Allied bombing of his native
                                > Dresden.
                                >
                                > I enjoyed reading your ideas on THE UNANSWERED QUESTION, though I
                                > never saw "God" as the one posing the question to humankind. I
                                agree
                                > with you, however, in that the strings is "indicative of eternity
                                > (and God in it)." It is the background against which the
                                existential
                                > drama of the trumpet and the flutes are unfolding but which is
                                > indifferent to it at the same time. Translated to THE THIN RED
                                LINE,
                                > I see it as the cathedral of Nature that is Guadalcanal. I can
                                never
                                > forget the first time I saw the men make that long trek through the
                                > jungle, how they passed one indigenous elderly man going the
                                > opposite direction and who doesn't even seem to notice them. The
                                > armies fighting for Hill 210 may as well as be ants fighting over
                                an
                                > anthill.(And in the context of the vast cosmos, the battle has even
                                > lesser significance.) And at the end, when Witt is at the river and
                                > is shortly about to die, he looks up at those fruit bats in the
                                > tree; they're just hanging there upside down, a whole tree covered
                                > with them. For him, it's one of the last precious images of this
                                > world he will see, but what do those bats care whether he lives or
                                > dies?
                                >
                                > Tuan
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <xydeco95@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Tuan,
                                > >
                                > > I bought the Bernstein/NY Philharmonic version of THE UNANSWERED
                                > > QUESTION and the Reiner/Chicago Symphony version of EIN
                                > HELDENLEBEN
                                > > yesterday on my lunch break and listened to them as I sat in my
                                > car,
                                > > then listened to them again today on my way to work.
                                > >
                                > > My first impression of EIN HELDENLEBEN was not impressive, and I
                                > > considered THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA (speaking of great use of
                                > classical
                                > > music in film) a far better piece. Upon first hearing it, I was
                                > put
                                > > off by the overt romanticism, though I felt that the villan's
                                > > movement was so ridiculous that perhaps Strauss was satirizing
                                the
                                > > Romantics, a la Shaw. However, listening to it this morning
                                > softened
                                > > my criticism a bit. The bass sounds of the oboes, bassoons, and
                                > > horns are much more ominous in the villan's movement than my
                                first
                                > > impression, though the woodwinds are still ridiculous
                                > (intentionally,
                                > > I'm sure). This piece would work well in a tongue-in-cheek
                                horror
                                > > film like SANTA'S KILLER DWARVES! ;0
                                > >
                                > > THE UNANSWERED QUESTION is quite a piece, indeed. Ives' own
                                > program
                                > > on the piece confirms your ideas of it, but I had a bit different
                                > > impression based solely on listening to the work. The strings
                                > > persist for over a full minute into the piece, which to me is
                                > > indicative of eternity (and God in it). Then the trumpet poses
                                > the
                                > > question for the first time. The first response from the
                                > woodwinds
                                > > is soft and murmured. Then, each time the trumpet poses the
                                > > question, the responses become louder, more shrill, and more
                                > > cacaphonus, as well as more defiant. The piece brought to mind a
                                > > father standing before trembling children and asking for an
                                > > explanation, a question to which the answer is often "It wasn't
                                my
                                > > fault! He did it! It wasn't me!," etc. Children often come to
                                > defy
                                > > their fathers with age, as they do in this piece, but the
                                question
                                > > remains unanswered because the respondents are unwilling to face
                                > the
                                > > truth. My impression of the work is possibly colored by its use
                                > in
                                > > TTRL, with God posing the question to mankind, and only being
                                > > answered by lies, excuses, and defiance.
                                > >
                                > > Comparing the use of this technique (puny woodwinds representing
                                > the
                                > > respondents) in both pieces, I feel that Ives' use is much more
                                > > powerful. I can not shake the feeling that the Strauss work is
                                at
                                > > least in part satirical, though the composition does create a
                                > sense
                                > > of peril as well as consider the Machiavellian plotting of the
                                > villan
                                > > (s). Strauss' villans seem like the guys from HOME ALONE, while
                                > > Ives' intention with the technique is much different.
                                > >
                                > > On a side note, Ives' CENTRAL PARK IN THE DARK (on the same
                                album)
                                > is
                                > > a great piece. It is no wonder that Malick has an affinity for
                                > Ives,
                                > > considering that this piece has many of the same thematics as TNW
                                > in
                                > > its embrace of a more "natural" civilization.
                                > >
                                > > Regards,
                                > > Andrew
                                > >
                                >
                              • Angela Havel
                                vanvutu: Ah, yes, I checked out Five Variants... at Amazon (listened to 30 seconds). Turns out I have it on a tape with The Lark Ascending. Glad to hear
                                Message 15 of 21 , Mar 14, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  vanvutu:

                                  Ah, yes, I checked out "Five Variants..." at Amazon (listened to 30 seconds). Turns out I have it on a tape with "The Lark Ascending." Glad to hear there's another Vaughan Williams admirer out there in Malick land!

                                  Angela

                                  <vanvutu@...> wrote: Angela -

                                  Thank you for your comments. THE LARK ASCENDING is a beautiful
                                  piece, but I must confess its beauty has never touched me. Ralph
                                  Vaughan Williams's rarely performed/recorded FIVE VARIANTS OF DIVES
                                  AND LAZARUS is a very different story, with the aching atmospheric
                                  opening, the exquisite violin solo, and the great climax in the
                                  strings. A magnificent piece.

                                  Tuan


                                  --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, Angela Havel
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi:
                                  >
                                  > Wow, I have renewed respect for the trumpet as an orchestral
                                  instrument. Your analysis makes me want to take another course in
                                  interpreting classical music. And I'm sure Malick is as detailed in
                                  matching the music to the action as you are in your observation of
                                  how that music works to enhance the action.
                                  >
                                  > This is off-topic, but have you ever experienced the sublimity of
                                  Ralph Vaughan Williams "The Lark Ascending"? I would love to hear
                                  what you or anyone else has to say about that piece. Its genius in
                                  craftsmanship reminds me of Malick.
                                  >
                                  > Angela
                                  >
                                  > vanvutu wrote: > Kudos to Coppola, but there are few
                                  directors (maybe none) as
                                  > > brilliant at marrying music to film as Malick is.
                                  >






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