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Re: DOH/Bonnie & Clyde

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  • em_con_nho_hay_em_quen
    This river scene also parallels the one at the end of The Thin Red Line. Witt lets the mortally wounded Coombs float down the river to die alone rather than to
    Message 1 of 30 , Jan 15, 2004
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      This river scene also parallels the one at the end of The Thin
      Red Line. Witt lets the mortally wounded Coombs float down the river
      to die alone rather than to die in enemy hands. ("My friend here
      don't have long...") We see Witt running through the jungle to divert
      the Japanese away from his men. This is extremely similar
      to Gere's run through the woods from the police in DOH. After Witt
      exits the jungle, he suddenly finds himself by the Japanese. The
      effect here is ironic: even though Witt was able to "make it out of
      the woods,"so to speak, he is about to die! We remember his
      words at the beginning of the film: "I wondered how it be when I
      died...What it would be like to know that this breath now was the
      last one you was ever gonna draw. I just hope I can meet it the same
      way she did, with the same...calm. 'Cause that's where it's hidden,
      the immortality I hadn't seen."

      There is another, more subtle reference to Days of Heaven in The Thin
      Red Line: In the brig of the liberty ship, we see Witt light a match
      then blow it out. There is then a cut to a flashback of him as a
      child baling hay with his father. We see Witt marveling at the bits
      of hay blowing in the wind. The fire of the match, juxtaposed with
      the image of the hay, subtly creates an incendiary image. It recalls
      the biblical conflagaration that engulfs the farm at the end of Days
      of Heaven. Indeed, the fire motif manifests itself in many ways in
      The Thin red Line.

      Another image found in all-three of Malick's films is the abandoned
      dwelling: the tree house in Badlands, the Farmer's house in Days of
      Heaven (notice the clock with the motionless pendulum in the scene
      where Bill runs in and tells Abby that he killed the farmer and that
      they must flee), and the derelict plantation house with the bullet-
      riddled corrugated tin roof in The Thin Red Line.



      --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "fantomas1952" <ellis@n...>
      wrote:
      > I watched Bonnie & Clyde yesterday.
      > The river scene with the traveling homeless
      > family reminded me a bit of the river scene
      > where Gere was killed in DOH.
      >
      > B&C had just barely escaped from the police.
      > Desperate, wounded. Their gang
      > members had been killed or captured.
      >
      > I was truly waiting for police to come wading
      > down or from behind trees to finish them off.
      > It was probably more of a visual similarity to DOH.
      > The writing was certainly much different.
      > And DOH was a better movie - IMHO.
      >
      > But the feeling of impending doom floating toward
      > the protagonists by the river was the same.
      >
      > m.e.
    • Bilge Ebiri
      ... I don t know if anybody has mentioned it before, but the bullet-riddled house in TTRL echoes the scene of Witt s mother s death earlier in the film. Witt s
      Message 2 of 30 , Jan 15, 2004
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        >
        > Another image found in all-three of Malick's films is the abandoned
        > dwelling: the tree house in Badlands, the Farmer's house in Days of
        > Heaven (notice the clock with the motionless pendulum in the scene
        > where Bill runs in and tells Abby that he killed the farmer and that
        > they must flee), and the derelict plantation house with the bullet-
        > riddled corrugated tin roof in The Thin Red Line.
        >


        I don't know if anybody has mentioned it before, but the bullet-riddled
        house in TTRL echoes the scene of Witt's mother's death earlier in the film.
        Witt's mom's room has a birdcage in it, with a bird in it. The camera pans
        across and then tilts up, and we briefly see that there's no roof here. The
        camera move is repeated during Witt & Walsh's conversation in the abandoned
        house, which also has a bird cage (empty, of course), and the camera tilts
        up to reveal that the roof is full of holes, letting brief shafts of light
        in. (This as Walsh is asking Witt if he's still "believing in the beautiful
        light".) I don't know if there's one specific meaning to all this, but it's
        interesting to note that one of the stages of Witt's journey to death is a
        visit (symbolically, of course) to what appears to be the burnt out shell of
        his mother's house.

        -Bilge
      • em_con_nho_hay_em_quen
        The light shining through the bullet holes in The Thin Red Line is also a visual parallel to the scene where Bead (played by Nick Stahl) is dying and asks Fife
        Message 3 of 30 , Jan 15, 2004
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          The light shining through the bullet holes in The Thin Red Line is
          also a visual parallel to the scene where Bead (played by Nick Stahl)
          is dying and asks Fife to hold his hand. We see a high angle of Bead
          on his back arching his neck to look up above him. The camera then
          assums his POV: light shining through the holes of these insect-
          ravages leaves.

          Notice, too, after Witt lifts up his rifle at the Japanese and is
          then killed, there is a quick cut of light shining down through the
          jungle canopy. So I always thought that the scene where he looks up
          at the light coming through those holes of that corrugated tin roof
          is a foreshadowing of his own death.

          I also think that the flashback of Witt's mother's death, where the
          camera pans up to show the sky where the ceiling should be is a
          reference to Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous essay entitled "The Over-
          Soul", where he wrote: "Let us learn the revelation of all nature and
          thought; that the Highest dwells within us, that the sources of
          nature are in our own minds. As there is no screen or ceiling between
          our heads and the infinite heavens, so there is no bar or wall in the
          soul where we, the effect, cease, and God, the cause, begins."

          Remember the voice-over we hear during the long trek to the Line at
          the beginning of the film: "You, too, are the source of all that's
          gonna be born."





          > I don't know if anybody has mentioned it before, but the bullet-
          riddled
          > house in TTRL echoes the scene of Witt's mother's death earlier in
          the film.
          > Witt's mom's room has a birdcage in it, with a bird in it. The
          camera pans
          > across and then tilts up, and we briefly see that there's no roof
          here. The
          > camera move is repeated during Witt & Walsh's conversation in the
          abandoned
          > house, which also has a bird cage (empty, of course), and the
          camera tilts
          > up to reveal that the roof is full of holes, letting brief shafts
          of light
          > in. (This as Walsh is asking Witt if he's still "believing in the
          beautiful
          > light".) I don't know if there's one specific meaning to all this,
          but it's
          > interesting to note that one of the stages of Witt's journey to
          death is a
          > visit (symbolically, of course) to what appears to be the burnt out
          shell of
          > his mother's house.
          >
          > -Bilge
        • Angela Havel
          Hello: I don t know who submitted this, but it needs to be added to the Malick Iconography/Similarities list that Christina, Aaron and I worked on a couple of
          Message 4 of 30 , Jan 16, 2004
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            Hello:

            I don't know who submitted this, but it needs to be added to the Malick Iconography/Similarities list that Christina, Aaron and I worked on a couple of years ago--does anyone know where Christina is? I guess I need to try to e-mail her directly.

            Angela


            > Another image found in all-three of Malick's films is the abandoned
            > dwelling: the tree house in Badlands, the Farmer's house in Days of
            > Heaven (notice the clock with the motionless pendulum in the scene
            > where Bill runs in and tells Abby that he killed the farmer and that
            > they must flee), and the derelict plantation house with the bullet-
            > riddled corrugated tin roof in The Thin Red Line.
            >




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