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Re: Beach Red (1967) & The Thin Red Line (1964)

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  • jasper_burrows
    ... genre ... people ... find out ... TTRL ... to ... whether ... will ... Hi Carsten, If you re looking at genre and the war film, two books come to mind
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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      --- In terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com, "Carsten Kurpanek" <Q-
      Panic@w...> wrote:
      > Hello Ian,
      >
      > thank you very much for this information. My paper is actually a
      genre
      > criticism on The Thin Red Line. I have read many reviews in which
      people
      > said TTRL is no war film. Well, what I am basically doing is to
      find out
      > which of war film's standard situation and scenes can be found in
      TTRL
      > and more important what makes it different. It would have been nice
      to
      > have seen the earlier version of TTRL to compare it and find out
      whether
      > it is a more "pure" war movie than Malick's film.
      >
      > However, my paper is written in German and I don't have the time to
      > translate it. I can post it here anyway if anyone's interested. I
      will
      > finish it in late September, though.
      >
      > X Carsten.
      >

      Hi Carsten,

      If you're looking at genre and the war film, two books come to mind
      which are useful as templates for a genre discussion:

      Jeanine Basinger's The WWII Combat film: Anatomy of a Genre(1986)
      Lawwrence H. Suid's Guts and Glory (2002)

      I'm currently teaching Sands of Iwo Jima which, by the way has an
      interesting exchange between two soldiers towards the end. Farmer, a
      young soldier asks Thomas, the older 'rebellious' type why they're
      fighting for the island.

      Thomas: That's war, son.
      Farmer: What's war?
      Thomas: Trading real estate for human life.

      This sounds very similar to some of Gen. Quintard's thoughts in TTRL
      as well as Welsh's refrain about "property".

      Iwo Jima is, of course, a massively propagandistic film besides, but
      that small scene stands out against John Wayne's "lemon-coloured" bad
      guys!

      cheers
      ian
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