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manhunter / thin red line / stuff

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  • * Rijsdijk, I, Ian, Mr
    Hi all, Deeply immersed in exam scripts at present and picking up a few threads late, but here goes. Manhunter: Got it on DVD from a mate in England and loved
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 4, 2002
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      Hi all,

      Deeply immersed in exam scripts at present and picking up a few
      threads late, but here goes.

      Manhunter: Got it on DVD from a mate in England and loved watching it
      again after so many years (about 8 for me). I feel it has dated a
      bit, but the music by Mann regulars The Reds really adds to the film
      (as it does to a Mann produced film The Band of the Hand). What
      struck me however, was the scene where Dolarhyde sleeps with the
      blind woman (who's name escapes me now) which is very unusual in
      serial killer movies. There's the hint at normalization in his life
      which really sparks the movie off when it threatens to turn into
      another "freak on the loose" movie.

      By the way, I heard from locals that Mann was not the friendliest guy
      to work with on the set of Ali which was shot partly in Mozambique.

      Thin Red Line:
      [1] There was an international film and history conference at the
      University of Cape Town in July at which I delivered a paper on
      Malick. It's accessible at the following address:
      www.uct.ac.za/conferences/filmhistorynow
      Click on papers and look for Ian-Malcolm Rijsdijk.

      There were some other really sharp papers as well on matters
      cinematic and historical.

      [2] A US academic mentioned something to me about a longer cut of
      Thin Red Line that has surfaced, apparently running to about 5 hours.
      Has anyone out there heard anything in this regard?

      Cheers
      ian
    • William Boodell
      Ian, Mann s rumored to be a hard-ass and control freak so your sources could very well be right. I don t think he s always diplomatically kind, but he s
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 4, 2002
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        Ian,
        Mann's rumored to be a hard-ass and control freak so
        your sources could very well be right. I don't think
        he's always diplomatically kind, but he's always
        driven. :)

        Bill


        --- "* Rijsdijk, I, Ian, Mr" <ianr@...>
        wrote:
        > Hi all,
        >
        > Deeply immersed in exam scripts at present and
        > picking up a few
        > threads late, but here goes.
        >
        > Manhunter: Got it on DVD from a mate in England and
        > loved watching it
        > again after so many years (about 8 for me). I feel
        > it has dated a
        > bit, but the music by Mann regulars The Reds really
        > adds to the film
        > (as it does to a Mann produced film The Band of the
        > Hand). What
        > struck me however, was the scene where Dolarhyde
        > sleeps with the
        > blind woman (who's name escapes me now) which is
        > very unusual in
        > serial killer movies. There's the hint at
        > normalization in his life
        > which really sparks the movie off when it threatens
        > to turn into
        > another "freak on the loose" movie.
        >
        > By the way, I heard from locals that Mann was not
        > the friendliest guy
        > to work with on the set of Ali which was shot partly
        > in Mozambique.
        >
        > Thin Red Line:
        > [1] There was an international film and history
        > conference at the
        > University of Cape Town in July at which I delivered
        > a paper on
        > Malick. It's accessible at the following address:
        > www.uct.ac.za/conferences/filmhistorynow
        > Click on papers and look for Ian-Malcolm Rijsdijk.
        >
        > There were some other really sharp papers as well on
        > matters
        > cinematic and historical.
        >
        > [2] A US academic mentioned something to me about a
        > longer cut of
        > Thin Red Line that has surfaced, apparently running
        > to about 5 hours.
        > Has anyone out there heard anything in this regard?
        >
        > Cheers
        > ian
        >


        =====
        ----
        MADELEINE
        Only one is a wanderer; two together are always going somewhere.

        -Vertigo (1958)

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      • capttoates
        ... I read your paper, which is really good BTW, and had a couple of comments. You raise the question why there s been this recent spate of WWII movies and
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 13, 2002
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          --- In terrencemalick@y..., "* Rijsdijk, I, Ian, Mr" <ianr@b...>
          wrote:

          > Thin Red Line:
          > [1] There was an international film and history conference at the
          > University of Cape Town in July at which I delivered a paper on
          > Malick. It's accessible at the following address:
          > www.uct.ac.za/conferences/filmhistorynow
          > Click on papers and look for Ian-Malcolm Rijsdijk.

          I read your paper, which is really good BTW, and had a couple of
          comments.

          You raise the question why there's been this recent spate of WWII
          movies and cite Basinger as well as introduce your idea that it's
          because the special effects are now there to do it properly. I think
          it has to do with the 90s being a post-Iraq war era. I remember Bush
          administration officials cheering over how the 1991 war with Iraq did
          not turn out like Vietnam. It had a victory, it had the legitimacy of
          a multi-state coalition and it had a clear villain played by Saddam
          Hussein. And it had clean, abstract visuals--images of Patriot
          missiles reaching their targets got regular airplay on the nightly
          news here. I think those factors made war and war movies incredibly
          marketable, and what better war to market and memorialize in movies
          than World War II, the "Good War"?

          You also say in your paper that The Thin Red Line problematizes
          identity. I would put it this way. Perhaps this is a bit of a crude
          distinction, but I see Saving Private Ryan as characterizing the
          enemy as Other and abject. Those Germans are evil and not to be
          humanized. The Thin Red Line characterizes the Other as the Same. The
          enemy respects the beauty of an orchid, suffers, cries, protects his
          comrade, and even speaks when dead.

          I think there was a bit of hope in the post-Cold War world. But now
          we've come right back to the Cold War order, where the Other is
          abject to us, where identities of good and evil, patriots and
          traitors, are rigidly drawn.

          Cheerless,
          Christina
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