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8425[terrencemalick] Malick's story-telling style

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  • Angela Havel
    May 20 7:29 AM
       
      Here's the correct link to the internal/external plot info: http://www.svic.net/pearl/plot.html
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      >A misplaced comma messed up the link in my previous post.
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      >I know I learned at some point in a graduate school literature course that stories in the Eastern tradition of plot don't privilege the rising action/climax/falling action model we're all used to in the West. If you looked at the East vs. West styles in a graph, the West shows a rising curve to a climax while the Eastern tradition would show a horizontal line with several small rises, rather than a rise to one climax.  However, this source is lost to memory, and after some searching online, I don't see a good compare/contrast of the two styles. The best I can find for now is a piece that discusses the Eastern tradition of *oral* storytelling, which includes some description in the third and fourth paragraphs about the bardic tradition and storytellers as "healers" that makes me think Malick studies and appreciates the Eastern storytelling forms: http://www.timsheppard.co.uk/story/dir/traditions/asiamiddleeast.html
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      >I'll bet this presentation would be useful in getting more insight into the differences between the Eastern and Western traditions: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Campbell-Shaping-Eastern-Tradition/dp/1583500545/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337458841&sr=8-1
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      >I doubt Malick reads Joseph Campbell, but Malick may have read some of the original sources from which Campbell creates his "lay person's guide to myths." However, Malick's films are not Myth 101--I'd put them at an 800-level course--which is what I like about them, and which is what many others don't like about them. 
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      >>________________________________
      >> From: Frank Cook <orbital.11@...>
      >>To: anghave@...
      >>Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2012 1:48 PM
      >>Subject: RE: [terrencemalick] Malick sightings
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>Hi..
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      >>Could you repost this link ? It doesn't seem to be working..I'm really interested in what you said about Eastern style of storytelling vs Western style..Could you give me more info-via your opinion or through other sources?
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      >>http://www.svic.net/pearl/plot.html%2c...
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      >>Thanks,
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      >>Frank
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      >>Look up! Look up! Seek your maker fore Gabriel blows his horn...
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      >>________________________________
      >>To: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
      >>From: anghave@...
      >>Date: Sat, 19 May 2012 11:33:40 -0700
      >>Subject: Re: [terrencemalick] Malick sightings
      >>
      >> 
      >>Thanks for posting...the comments below clip are humorous..."HE DOES EXIST!!!"
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      >>I finally saw Tree of Life.
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      >>Observations:
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      >>The mom floating was trippy.
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      >>Brad Pitt's face is too kindly-looking to convincingly play a mean father.
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      >>I related to the part where the family relaxes when the dad leaves for his trip...my father was much harsher than Malick's appeared to be, though. (Isn't it generally agreed this film is about Malick's own family?)
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      >>Liked the originality of presentation, though a small part of me agrees withChristopher Plummer here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw08GQw0hBI
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      >>However, Malick doesn't "need a writer." He's a great writer himself, evidenced by his characterizations, dialogue, detailed descriptions, and general subtlety that marks a good writer in the two scripts I've read, Badlands and Days of Heaven.Starting with The Thin Red Line, he favors an Eastern style of story-telling, where "external" plot is not as important as "internal" plot (see http://www.svic.net/pearl/plot.html,) and there is no clearly-delineated exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, or denouement. Not necessarily a bad thing, but unsettling to those who cannot forego the Western-style "external" plot.
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      >>I appreciate Malick thumbing his nose at the conventions of Western story-telling, yet I like his first two films, the two that display more conventional story lines, better than his later films. Not sure what that means. 
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      >>>________________________________
      >>> From: vanvutu <vanvutu@...>
      >>>To: terrencemalick@yahoogroups.com
      >>>Sent: Thursday, May 17, 2012 12:38 PM
      >>>Subject: [terrencemalick] Malick sightings
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> 
      >>>From the current (May/June) issue of FILM COMMENT:
      >>>
      >>>Longtime Austin resident Terrence Malick
      >>>was spotted at SXSW shooting material
      >>>for his film about local music scenesters.
      >>>Once known as LAWLESS, the movie awaits
      >>>a re-christening after Malick generously
      >>>ceded the title to John Hillcoat, who'd
      >>>wanted it for the upcoming Prohibition
      >>>crime drama. Not-LAWLESS stars Christian
      >>>Bale, Ryan Gosling, Cate Blanchett,
      >>>Rooney Mara, and Natalie Portman, and
      >>>will be followed, per Malick's newly accel-
      >>>erated rate of production, by KNIGHT OF
      >>>CUPS, which re-teams Bale-Blanchett-
      >>>Portman and is apparently named after
      >>>a tarot card. No reports at press time of
      >>>demand for the latter title.
      >>>
      >>>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      >>>
      >>>And here is a video of Malick filming something with Christian Bale.During the shooting, a female bystander interrupts by offering Bale a canned beverage, which he accepts. She walks away saying, "That was so awesome!"
      >>>
      >>>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY__M_5WWjA
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
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