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Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

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  • phyllis bullon
    An additional tidbit on the side... If the job you have been hired to do conflicts with your personal morals, cite the Code of Ethics..... shall accept
    Message 1 of 18 , May 31, 2005
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      An additional tidbit on the side... If the job you have been hired to do conflicts with your personal morals, cite the Code of Ethics..... "shall accept assignments using discretion with regard to...... and the consumers involved" and withdraw from the situation. 
       
      You can sell your hands and live with yourself easily, but don't sell your soul.
       
      Phyllis S. Bullon
      DARS/BEI Certified
      Sign Language Interpreter
      Private Practitioner
      E-mail:  signs2go@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 9:41 PM
      Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

      Typically institutions for higher learning will verify the students ADA qualifications/service requirements before providing the service. 
       
      I work for a small town college and happen to be friends with an employee in the Disability Services Office.  She will often call me and ask if I am available for such and such dates, pending verification of the paperwork.  They check the students prior educational records for accomodations, the state rehabilitation agency/social security disability files for eligibility, and medical records (doctors declaration of disability). 
       
      If the Disability Services Office has done their job, then just do yours... if the client is fraudulent, they will be found out at some point in time and they will be required to pay the piper in their own way. 
       
      Documentation for your own records might be a wise precautionary tool should you be subpeonaed to appear in court.  After all, you are bound by confidentiality as a Sign Language Interpreter between your DEAF and HEARING clients.  My take on this is, if you don't have a Deaf client, then the boundaries set by the Code of Ethics don't apply.
      Until otherwise proven, do the job you were hired to do.
       
      Phyllis S. Bullon
      DARS/BEI Certified
      Sign Language Interpreter
      Private Practitioner
      E-mail:  signs2go@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: dvlopez
      Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 6:08 PM
      Subject: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

      Just want to pick your brains on this one....higher ed institution wants to hire you to interpret for a new Deaf Student.  At the first assignment, Deaf Student tells Interp they lost their hearing recently due to an accident.  (They told some else they lost their hearing due to tumors.)  Student laughs at jokes before punch line is interpreted.  Student is prolific at lip reading and voice level in ANY situation either quiet environment or loud environment.  Student responds to their name when called.
       
      Student is planning on traveling overseas on a grant for education...many times this year.  Interpreter suspects there is fraud going on here...what would you do????!!!!!
    • terperto@EARTHLINK.NET
      Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp? What s the benefit? I have a client who recently lost their hering (a year or two ago) they do
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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        Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp? What's the benefit?

        I have a client who recently lost their hering (a year or two ago) they do well in small groups, can lip read better than I can, can use the phone with an amplifier etc. However the client still uses an interpreter for trainings and classroom type settings. The client used to request trranslit but now has asked the interpreters not to mouth because it's "like an echo." The client is trying to learn ASL and integrate with the Deaf community since their hearing loss will continue to deteriorate over time.

        Hearing loss is a tricky thing. I saw a lot of students at Gally who chose to talk to each other rather than sign (these were D/HH students, not HUGs or Grads). I'd agree with Victoria, give the school and the student the benfit of the doubt until you know more. There's all kinds of people with hearing loss who choose to use interpreters in different settings for different reasons.

        As far as conflicting stories. Maybe the student is embarassed about what happened (if it was an accident) or doesn't want to disclose their medical info to everyone.

        -Roberto Santiago, MA

        -----Original Message-----
        From: dvlopez <dvlopez@...>
        Sent: May 31, 2005 7:08 PM
        To: Terp List <terps-l@...>
        Subject: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

        Just want to pick your brains on this one....higher ed institution wants to hire you to interpret for a new Deaf Student. At the first assignment, Deaf Student tells Interp they lost their hearing recently due to an accident. (They told some else they lost their hearing due to tumors.) Student laughs at jokes before punch line is interpreted. Student is prolific at lip reading and voice level in ANY situation either quiet environment or loud environment. Student responds to their name when called.

        Student is planning on traveling overseas on a grant for education...many times this year. Interpreter suspects there is fraud going on here...what would you do????!!!!!

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      • Jacobs Jennifer
        One more thought on this... We have a student who has a hearing loss due to a serious motor vehicle accident. Like your student, many of us felt uncomfortable
        Message 3 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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          One more thought on this...

          We have a student who has a hearing loss due to a serious motor vehicle accident. Like your student, many of us felt uncomfortable interpreting for someone who often answered before the question was signed. However, the nature of this student's brain injury was such that the hearing loss would vary in severity. Also, because of the injury, having an interpreter helped the student focus in on the lecture/discussion. Communication access can take many forms, smile.

          Jennifer Jacobs, CSC
          Santa Rosa Junior College

          -----Original Message-----
          From: owner-terps-l@...
          [mailto:owner-terps-l@...]On Behalf Of dvlopez
          Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 5:13 PM
          To: terps-l@...
          Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....


          independent contractor.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Marcia Reaver" <mreaver@...>
          To: <terps-l@...>
          Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2005 6:35 PM
          Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....


          > Point of clarification. Is the interpreter an employee of the institution
          > or an independent contractor?
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: dvlopez <dvlopez@...>
          > Sent: May 31, 2005 7:08 PM
          > To: Terp List <terps-l@...>
          > Subject: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....
          >
          > Just want to pick your brains on this one....higher ed institution wants
          > to hire you to interpret for a new Deaf Student. At the first assignment,
          > Deaf Student tells Interp they lost their hearing recently due to an
          > accident. (They told some else they lost their hearing due to tumors.)
          > Student laughs at jokes before punch line is interpreted. Student is
          > prolific at lip reading and voice level in ANY situation either quiet
          > environment or loud environment. Student responds to their name when
          > called.
          >
          > Student is planning on traveling overseas on a grant for education...many
          > times this year. Interpreter suspects there is fraud going on here...what
          > would you do????!!!!!
          >
          > To unsubscribe: send mail to <majordomo@...>
          > with "unsubscribe terps-l" in the body of the message.
          >
          > Message Archive at:
          > http://majordomo.valenciacc.edu/hypermail/terps-l/
          >
          > Hosted by Valencia Community College, Orlando, FL
          > http://valenciacc.edu
          >


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        • Dan Parvaz
          ... I ve had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as possible. They faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get- out-of-jail-free card
          Message 4 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp?  What's the benefit?  


            I've had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as possible. They faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get-out-of-jail-free card for bombing a test, umpteen people to blame (interpreters, note-takers, support staff), extended exam times, the ability to give the prof. grief for not captioning movies, and in other ways hold an ADA "stick" over people's heads.

            To be fair, I've had clients who are awesome lipreaders and have just enough residual hearing to make the whole process look like magic, but still really benefit from "sign support". The key is that these folks don't exhibit any other attention-grabbing, excuse-making tactics. They're not covered in piercings and tribal tattoos, they don't stick an orange leash on the family dog and drag it to school, they don't browbeat fellow students and faculty in flawless (and I mean *flawless*) spoken English on how "deaf culture" excuses their godawful behavior.

            Wouldn't it be nice if there were an intervention committee of actual D/HH folks could stop people like this  from diverting resources? They could basically call someone on the carpet and vote their malingering asses off the island?

            -Dan.

          • terperto@EARTHLINK.NET
            Oh. Right on, I hadn t thought about all that. Something else occured to me today. In the case of someone who may have a degenerative condition (I m thinking
            Message 5 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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              Oh. Right on, I hadn't thought about all that.

              Something else occured to me today. In the case of someone who may have a degenerative condition (I'm thinking of a client of mine) they could be trying to establish a level of service now in order to acclimate both themselves and the establishments they are attached to to the having interpreters around. That way they don't have to fight for things mid year or mid career.

              -Roberto Santiago MA


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Dan Parvaz <dparvaz@...>
              Sent: Jun 1, 2005 12:42 PM
              To: terps-l@...
              Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

              > Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp?
              > What's the benefit?

              I've had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as
              possible. They faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get-
              out-of-jail-free card for bombing a test, umpteen people to blame
              (interpreters, note-takers, support staff), extended exam times, the
              ability to give the prof. grief for not captioning movies, and in
              other ways hold an ADA "stick" over people's heads.

              To be fair, I've had clients who are awesome lipreaders and have just
              enough residual hearing to make the whole process look like magic,
              but still really benefit from "sign support". The key is that these
              folks don't exhibit any other attention-grabbing, excuse-making
              tactics. They're not covered in piercings and tribal tattoos, they
              don't stick an orange leash on the family dog and drag it to school,
              they don't browbeat fellow students and faculty in flawless (and I
              mean *flawless*) spoken English on how "deaf culture" excuses their
              godawful behavior.

              Wouldn't it be nice if there were an intervention committee of actual
              D/HH folks could stop people like this from diverting resources?
              They could basically call someone on the carpet and vote their
              malingering asses off the island?

              -Dan.



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              http://valenciacc.edu
            • jody.bjornstad@co.hennepin.mn.us
              Warning: sarcastic reply Wait, I m confused. So no Deaf people have tattoos or piercings? So no Deaf people bring their dogs to school? or participate in
              Message 6 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                Warning: sarcastic reply

                Wait, I'm confused. So no Deaf people have tattoos or piercings? So no
                Deaf people bring their dogs to school? or participate in other obnoxious
                behavior? And that's how we knew the truly Deaf?





                "Dan Parvaz"
                <dparvaz@...>
                Sent by: To
                owner-terps-l@maj terps-l@...
                ordomo.valenciacc cc
                .edu
                Subject
                Re: [terps-l] the money is nice
                06/01/2005 11:42 but.....
                AM


                Please respond to
                terps-l@majordomo
                .valenciacc.edu






                    Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp?
                What's the benefit?



                I've had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as possible. They
                faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get-out-of-jail-free
                card for bombing a test, umpteen people to blame (interpreters,
                note-takers, support staff), extended exam times, the ability to give the
                prof. grief for not captioning movies, and in other ways hold an ADA
                "stick" over people's heads.

                To be fair, I've had clients who are awesome lipreaders and have just
                enough residual hearing to make the whole process look like magic, but
                still really benefit from "sign support". The key is that these folks don't
                exhibit any other attention-grabbing, excuse-making tactics. They're not
                covered in piercings and tribal tattoos, they don't stick an orange leash
                on the family dog and drag it to school, they don't browbeat fellow
                students and faculty in flawless (and I mean *flawless*) spoken English on
                how "deaf culture" excuses their godawful behavior.

                Wouldn't it be nice if there were an intervention committee of actual D/HH
                folks could stop people like this  from diverting resources? They could
                basically call someone on the carpet and vote their malingering asses off
                the island?

                -Dan.




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                http://valenciacc.edu
              • Morin, Gary (NIH/OD)
                Well, I for one would be more than happy to take anyone down to Fatty s if they re looking for good tattoo and body piercing work! Gary M. Morin, Program
                Message 7 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                  Well, I for one would be more than happy to take anyone down to Fatty's if
                  they're looking for good tattoo and body piercing work!

                  Gary M. Morin, Program Analyst
                  NIH Section 508 Coordinator
                  HHS NIH Office of Equal Opportunity & Diversity Management
                  Division of Policy, Planning, Programs and Diversity Management
                  2 Center Drive, Room 3E-16
                  Bethesda MD 20892-0245

                  (301) 496-4628 tel.
                  (301) 496-9755/480-3122 TTY
                  (301) 402-0994 fax

                  How is my customer service? Please feel free to comment by going to the
                  OEODM Customer Service Survey link below.
                  Thank you!
                  http://oeodm.od.nih.gov/About/custsurvey.asp

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: jody.bjornstad@...
                  [mailto:jody.bjornstad@...]
                  Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 1:26 PM
                  To: terps-l@...
                  Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

                  Warning: sarcastic reply

                  Wait, I'm confused. So no Deaf people have tattoos or piercings? So no
                  Deaf people bring their dogs to school? or participate in other obnoxious
                  behavior? And that's how we knew the truly Deaf?





                  "Dan Parvaz"
                  <dparvaz@...>
                  Sent by: To
                  owner-terps-l@maj terps-l@...
                  ordomo.valenciacc cc
                  .edu
                  Subject
                  Re: [terps-l] the money is nice
                  06/01/2005 11:42 but.....
                  AM


                  Please respond to
                  terps-l@majordomo
                  .valenciacc.edu






                      Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp?
                  What's the benefit?



                  I've had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as possible. They
                  faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get-out-of-jail-free
                  card for bombing a test, umpteen people to blame (interpreters,
                  note-takers, support staff), extended exam times, the ability to give the
                  prof. grief for not captioning movies, and in other ways hold an ADA
                  "stick" over people's heads.

                  To be fair, I've had clients who are awesome lipreaders and have just
                  enough residual hearing to make the whole process look like magic, but
                  still really benefit from "sign support". The key is that these folks don't
                  exhibit any other attention-grabbing, excuse-making tactics. They're not
                  covered in piercings and tribal tattoos, they don't stick an orange leash
                  on the family dog and drag it to school, they don't browbeat fellow
                  students and faculty in flawless (and I mean *flawless*) spoken English on
                  how "deaf culture" excuses their godawful behavior.

                  Wouldn't it be nice if there were an intervention committee of actual D/HH
                  folks could stop people like this  from diverting resources? They could
                  basically call someone on the carpet and vote their malingering asses off
                  the island?

                  -Dan.




                  To unsubscribe: send mail to <majordomo@...>
                  with "unsubscribe terps-l" in the body of the message.

                  Message Archive at:
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                  http://valenciacc.edu


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                  http://valenciacc.edu
                • Denise Wetzler
                  I do know of a few folks with Meuniers (spelling?) whose hearing comes and goes, depending on the disease itself. Could something like this be goin g on?
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                    I do know of a few folks with Meuniers (spelling?) whose hearing comes and goes, depending on the disease itself. Could something like this be goin g on?

                    Denise



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: terperto@...
                    Sent: Jun 1, 2005 10:23 AM
                    To: terps-l@...
                    Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....


                    Oh. Right on, I hadn't thought about all that.

                    Something else occured to me today. In the case of someone who may have a degenerative condition (I'm thinking of a client of mine) they could be trying to establish a level of service now in order to acclimate both themselves and the establishments they are attached to to the having interpreters around. That way they don't have to fight for things mid year or mid career.

                    -Roberto Santiago MA


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Dan Parvaz <dparvaz@...>
                    Sent: Jun 1, 2005 12:42 PM
                    To: terps-l@...
                    Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

                    > Why would someone pretend to be Deaf so they could get a terp?
                    > What's the benefit?

                    I've had clients who clearly just liked as much attention as
                    possible. They faked their way through an audiogram so they get a get-
                    out-of-jail-free card for bombing a test, umpteen people to blame
                    (interpreters, note-takers, support staff), extended exam times, the
                    ability to give the prof. grief for not captioning movies, and in
                    other ways hold an ADA "stick" over people's heads.

                    To be fair, I've had clients who are awesome lipreaders and have just
                    enough residual hearing to make the whole process look like magic,
                    but still really benefit from "sign support". The key is that these
                    folks don't exhibit any other attention-grabbing, excuse-making
                    tactics. They're not covered in piercings and tribal tattoos, they
                    don't stick an orange leash on the family dog and drag it to school,
                    they don't browbeat fellow students and faculty in flawless (and I
                    mean *flawless*) spoken English on how "deaf culture" excuses their
                    godawful behavior.

                    Wouldn't it be nice if there were an intervention committee of actual
                    D/HH folks could stop people like this from diverting resources?
                    They could basically call someone on the carpet and vote their
                    malingering asses off the island?

                    -Dan.



                    To unsubscribe: send mail to <majordomo@...>
                    with "unsubscribe terps-l" in the body of the message.

                    Message Archive at:
                    http://majordomo.valenciacc.edu/hypermail/terps-l/

                    Hosted by Valencia Community College, Orlando, FL
                    http://valenciacc.edu



                    Denise Wetzler, BA, CI/CT
                    President, AzRID
                    nisew@...

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                  • Johnston, Josephine S CIV
                    Well...understand that there are varying degrees of D/deafness/hearing, as well as so many variables to this... did the person tell you the loss was from an
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                      Well...understand that there are varying degrees of D/deafness/hearing, as well as so many variables to this...
                      did the person tell you the loss was from an accident and then a few weeks later tell someone else that it was from tumors, after they themself found out?  If it was fairly recent that the person lost their hearing, the diagnosis might not be complete yet.  Or are they like George Costanza (Seinfeld) faking blindness to get books on tape, or the involuntary elbow spasm with no regard to whose time is 'wasted'.
                       
                      Aside from all that, I've interpreted ((not transliterated) for a 'sleeper' all day lecture type, thought for sure was just doing a dog and pony show, well to my suprise, the person sprung up and answered a pretty technical question that no one else in the class could, with full explanation, so it was evident they were right there with us all along.
                       
                      you can make the decision to:
                      not accept the assignment
                      make an anonymous call (if you feel so strongly about it)
                      or just do the job
                      Jody
                    • VStuard241@AOL.COM
                      -- There are always varibles that occur in any given situation that interpreters are not aware of because they are not in the loop. Someone mentioned earlier
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                        -- There are always varibles that occur in any given situation that interpreters are not aware of because they are not in the loop. Someone mentioned earlier about DSPS' responsibility to verify disabilities. That is absolutely true. The DSPS office is responsible for ensuring that the student is indeed disabled according to the legal defintion outlined by legal constraints.
                        The responsibility for ensuring that fraud does not occur in the execution of services belongs to the compliance officer of the school or university and his/her designee. If there is an issue of non verification of one's disability, the school would be responsible for "pulling all services" for that student and not the interpreter. Interpreters do not always have all the facts, and even though intuition and our gut level feelings are helpful, we can be assured that if there is a problem, it will unfold and will be taken care of by the university. The interpreter just needs to wait and do the job he/she has been hired to do. The only time I would say there would be a divergence from this protocol would be if a Deaf student, or any student was a danger to themselves or others. That is a whole different issue. Thank goodness, that has been one issue that I haven't had to face in the classroom, although I was once locked in a classroom by a hearing student with my Deaf st!
                        udents.
                        I would also like to add that I have seen some indiviudals become psychologically deaf.... I knew of someone who married a Deaf man many years ago who was hearing, and then, after a month of being married.. she started acting like she was Deaf and not hearing. That was very interesting especially from a sociological and psycholical point of view.
                        In this situation however, its best to wait it out..... if he/she are not Deaf, it will eventually come out. Just my two cents.Victoria Stuard, M.A., ABD, NADIV,CAI

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                      • phyllis bullon
                        Agreed! Do the job until someone tells you otherwise or withdraw from the situation. Phyllis S. Bullon DARS/BEI Certified Sign Language Interpreter Private
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                          Agreed! Do the job until someone tells you otherwise or withdraw from the
                          situation.

                          Phyllis S. Bullon
                          DARS/BEI Certified
                          Sign Language Interpreter
                          Private Practitioner
                          E-mail: signs2go@...
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: <VStuard241@...>
                          To: <terps-l@...>
                          Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 1:25 PM
                          Subject: RE: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....


                          > -- There are always varibles that occur in any given situation that
                          > interpreters are not aware of because they are not in the loop. Someone
                          > mentioned earlier about DSPS' responsibility to verify disabilities. That
                          > is absolutely true. The DSPS office is responsible for ensuring that the
                          > student is indeed disabled according to the legal defintion outlined by
                          > legal constraints.
                          > The responsibility for ensuring that fraud does not occur in the execution
                          > of services belongs to the compliance officer of the school or university
                          > and his/her designee. If there is an issue of non verification of one's
                          > disability, the school would be responsible for "pulling all services" for
                          > that student and not the interpreter. Interpreters do not always have all
                          > the facts, and even though intuition and our gut level feelings are
                          > helpful, we can be assured that if there is a problem, it will unfold and
                          > will be taken care of by the university. The interpreter just needs to
                          > wait and do the job he/she has been hired to do. The only time I would
                          > say there would be a divergence from this protocol would be if a Deaf
                          > student, or any student was a danger to themselves or others. That is a
                          > whole different issue. Thank goodness, that has been one issue that I
                          > haven't had to face in the classroom, although I was once locked in a
                          > classroom by a hearing student with my Deaf st!
                          > udents.
                          > I would also like to add that I have seen some indiviudals become
                          > psychologically deaf.... I knew of someone who married a Deaf man many
                          > years ago who was hearing, and then, after a month of being married.. she
                          > started acting like she was Deaf and not hearing. That was very
                          > interesting especially from a sociological and psycholical point of view.
                          > In this situation however, its best to wait it out..... if he/she are not
                          > Deaf, it will eventually come out. Just my two cents.Victoria Stuard,
                          > M.A., ABD, NADIV,CAI
                          >
                          > To unsubscribe: send mail to <majordomo@...>
                          > with "unsubscribe terps-l" in the body of the message.
                          >
                          > Message Archive at:
                          > http://majordomo.valenciacc.edu/hypermail/terps-l/
                          >
                          > Hosted by Valencia Community College, Orlando, FL
                          > http://valenciacc.edu
                          >
                          >



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                        • Dan Parvaz
                          ... Touché :-). I KNEW I d get gigged on that, but in my experience, no. Deaf students don t generally pretend their dog is a hearing dog, don t bring hearing
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                            Warning: sarcastic reply

                            Touché :-). I KNEW I'd get gigged on that, but in my experience, no. Deaf students don't generally pretend their dog is a hearing dog, don't bring hearing dogs to school (what's it gonna do? Tell 'em when their cellphone is ringing?). Heck, if they could get away with it, a lot of them would get rid of their embarrassing, monochromatically-dressed interpreters. Talk about the wrong kind of attention.

                            How do I tell the "truly Deaf?" For one, the truly Deaf can sign and don't talk just like a hearing person, and generally, um, can't hear. But if I'm not allowed to apply way-out-there criteria like that (because I'm just a hearing person and what do I know?) then I look for a pattern of attention-seeking behavior (I'm *special*!) which might incline me further towards the conclusion that claims of deafness are (a la Douglas Adams) a load of dingo's kidneys.

                            -Dan.
                          • Denise Wetzler
                            Well, do be careful. I have a friend who grew up hard of hearing and is just losing more. She talks just like a hearing person (with the help of a LOT of
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jun 1, 2005
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                              Well, do be careful.  I have a friend who grew up hard of hearing and is just losing more.  She talks just like a hearing person (with the help of a LOT of continuing speech therapy). but then again, she has always had that 'hearing mentality.' Funny, she signs pretty well.  then I have another friend who speaks almost as well, you would think she has a lisp, but can't sign her way out of a wet paper bag, can lipread better than anyone I know, and can hear certain voices, depending on the frequency.  Go figure.
                               
                              Denise
                               



                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Dan Parvaz
                              Sent: Jun 1, 2005 1:10 PM
                              To: terps-l@...
                              Subject: Re: [terps-l] the money is nice but.....

                              Warning: sarcastic reply

                              Touché :-). I KNEW I'd get gigged on that, but in my experience, no. Deaf students don't generally pretend their dog is a hearing dog, don't bring hearing dogs to school (what's it gonna do? Tell 'em when their cellphone is ringing?). Heck, if they could get away with it, a lot of them would get rid of their embarrassing, monochromatically-dressed interpreters. Talk about the wrong kind of attention.

                              How do I tell the "truly Deaf?" For one, the truly Deaf can sign and don't talk just like a hearing person, and generally, um, can't hear. But if I'm not allowed to apply way-out-there criteria like that (because I'm just a hearing person and what do I know?) then I look for a pattern of attention-seeking behavior (I'm *special*!) which might incline me further towards the conclusion that claims of deafness are (a la Douglas Adams) a load of dingo's kidneys.

                              -Dan.
                              
                              Denise Wetzler, BA, CI/CT
                              President, AzRID
                              nisew@...
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