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Re: observing near the ocean

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  • John Bambury
    ... Hal, Your water over there must have different salt in it to mine. (non corrosive salt water ?) All of the exterior metal fittings on my house are covered
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
      --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "Harold Newton" <hal.newton@i...>
      wrote:

      > To be honest, salt doesn't evaporate with the water, so unless
      > you're getting salt spray, I wouldn't think that there is much if
      > any salt getting to your scope. If the weather is bad enough to
      > cause breaking waves and salt spray, I doubt that you'd be there
      > anyway...
      >
      > Just my pennies,
      > -Hal

      Hal,

      Your water over there must have different salt in it to mine. (non
      corrosive salt water ?) All of the exterior metal fittings on my
      house are covered in salt corrosion yet I am too far from the salt
      water lake to get direct spray ? Over 50 metres with 3 rows of trees
      in the way. BTW the waves on the lake don't break so there is not
      much spray anyway. Could it be that it is very hot down here at the
      moment, over 100 deg F. ?

      Clear skies
      John Bambury
    • David
      Interesting discussion! Perhaps the darkest area in the eastern US (at least, according to P.Cinzano s light pollution map) is along undeveloped portions of
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
        Interesting discussion!
        Perhaps the darkest area in the eastern US (at least, according to
        P.Cinzano's light pollution map) is along undeveloped portions of the
        Outer Banks. This is the only place (in US) east of central Nebraska
        where you can get to a "Black" area on the Bortle scale without a
        boat :-)

        I've often thought about taking my scope out there but have hesitated
        due to concern over salt "in the air." My recollection of past trips
        to the beach was that I spent lots of time cleaning a greasy film off
        of house / car windows. OTOH, perhaps Hal was right... this may just
        be the result sustained winds carrying the ocean spray. Since I'd be
        camping, there's the additional concern of keeping sand away from my
        gear.

        Anyway, just a word of advice to those who might be thinking about
        observing at the Outer Banks: Pick your times carefully. Aside from
        the wind, you should avoid the summer (mosquitos are horrible,
        tourists are worse, and the haze, well, we all know what summertime
        haze does to transparency!). There's a campground near the Hatteras
        lighthouse, but it's currently closed (Hurricane Isabel damage).

        Regards,
        David Butler
        Charlotte, NC

        references:
        http://cleardarksky.com/lp/OcrakNClp.html
        http://novac.com/light/def.htm

        --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, Derek Jakoboski wrote:
        > Hi. I go to cape cod every summer, a few times every summer,
        actually, and naturally, my telescope comes along....anyway, I do
        alot of observing near the ocean. I usually set up in the parking
        lots on top of the dunes because you can see all the way down the
        horizon looking out over the ocean with miniaml rising heat
        interferance. But i'm thinking this might not be such a good idea.
        Would the salty air near the ocean wreck my telescope? I thinking it
        might put a light layer of salt on the mirror, and salt, being
        corrosive, would not be good for the coating. Or for the other moving
        part of the telescope. Is it bad to observe near the ocean?
        > Derek
      • John Class
        Here at Huntington Beach, California it s never very hot nor very cold and only one or two mosquitos in the worst nights. Dark skies to the South and Southwest
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
          Here at Huntington Beach, California it's never very hot nor very cold
          and only one or two mosquitos in the worst nights. Dark skies to the
          South and Southwest and stars usually do not "twinkle." Close double/
          multiple stars are quite easy to split but my f4.1 16-inch Newtonian
          helps, too.

          I can hear the surf most nights because I live in a housing tract less
          than one-quarter mile from the surf line.

          I've been studying the Trapezium [M42] in Orion this Fall/Winter
          using, among other eyepieces, an I3 Piece [TM]. Using a 5x Multiplier,
          the six brightest stars are "solid" and the seventh star is apparent
          and the eighth star is apparent but not "solid." But there are other
          stars including three other faint pairs imaged in the group. A 2.5x or
          5x Powermate or x2 Multiplier makes the I3 Piece [TM] nearly parfocal
          with my Nagler/Radian/Panoptic/Wide Field eyepieces.

          The telescope is stored vertically with original Lumicon covers on
          both ends. If the mirror is dewed the telescope is mounted the next
          day in the sun and allowed to dry. One afternoon recently it had not
          dried because I was late hanging the telescope and a very hot drier
          used to shrink shrink tubing was used from a distance to flow warm air
          up the tube and the moisture was gone in about 15 minutes.

          I thought I was washing the mirror too frequently so it gets washed
          about once a year when it's been used. We go to a b&b near Mt. Palomar
          for a few nights once a month and look through Michael Leigh's
          Observer's Inn telescopes -- his b&b was destroyed in the fires near
          Julian but the observatory is still intact.

          Clear skies,

          John Class
          73762dot31atcompuservedotcom
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