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Re: [Telescopes] Looking for an astronomy program

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  • Fred Lieberman
    Hi Dave, Thank you for your suggestion. I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC. The newer version, which I
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 2, 2011
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      Hi Dave,

      Thank you for your suggestion. I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the
      Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC.

      The newer version, which I installed on my windows platform only went
      back to 99,999 BC.

      Again, thank you.

      Fred

      On Fri, 2011-10-21 at 09:33 -0700, Dave Adalian wrote:
      > Have you tried Stellarium?
      >
      > -- Dave
      >
      > On 10/21/2011 8:16 AM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
      > >
      > > I am looking for a free astronomy program, which will allow me to see
      > > how Orion's shape changed 10,000, 100,000, even 1,000,000 years ago.
      > >
      > > Any suggestions?
      > >
      > > Fred
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > You are subscribed to the "Talking Telescopes" e-mail discussion group. To unsubscribe from this group, send an e-mail to:
      > telescopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Dave Adalian
      Glad I could help, Fred. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 2, 2011
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        Glad I could help, Fred.

        On 11/2/2011 1:04 PM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
        >
        > Hi Dave,
        >
        > Thank you for your suggestion. I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the
        > Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC.
        >
        > The newer version, which I installed on my windows platform only went
        > back to 99,999 BC.
        >
        > Again, thank you.
        >
        > Fred
        >
        > On Fri, 2011-10-21 at 09:33 -0700, Dave Adalian wrote:
        > > Have you tried Stellarium?
        > >
        > > -- Dave
        > >
        > > On 10/21/2011 8:16 AM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I am looking for a free astronomy program, which will allow me to see
        > > > how Orion's shape changed 10,000, 100,000, even 1,000,000 years ago.
        > > >
        > > > Any suggestions?
        > > >
        > > > Fred
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > You are subscribed to the "Talking Telescopes" e-mail discussion
        > group. To unsubscribe from this group, send an e-mail to:
        > > telescopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo
        > <mailto:telescopes-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.comYahoo>! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Geoff Gaherty
        ... I hope you realize that ALL planetarium software becomes increasingly inaccurate as you travel to distant time periods. If the authors of this software
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 2, 2011
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          On 02/11/11 4:04 PM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
          > I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the
          > Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC.
          >
          > The newer version, which I installed on my windows platform only went
          > back to 99,999 BC.

          I hope you realize that ALL planetarium software becomes increasingly
          inaccurate as you travel to distant time periods. If the authors of
          this software have reduced the time span covered, they probably did it
          because the positions in distant time periods were too inaccurate to be
          worth considering.

          Even over relatively short times, positions of small bodies such as
          asteroids and comets are often wildly off because of perturbations to
          their orbits by larger bodies. For example, Starry Night uses two
          different sets of orbital elements for Comet Halley, using 1910 and 1986
          epochs, because the orbits vary so much from one apparition to the next.
          That's why programs like Starry Night download updated asteroid,
          comet, and satellite orbits every few days.

          Geoff

          --
          Geoff Gaherty
          Foxmead Observatory
          Coldwater, Ontario, Canada
          http://www.gaherty.ca
        • William Hamblen
          Stellarium also does seem to account for proper motion of stars. I took my copy (0.10.6 on Slackware) back to -99999 and the shape of Ursa Major was
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 2, 2011
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            Stellarium also does seem to account for proper motion of stars. I took
            my copy (0.10.6 on Slackware) back to -99999 and the shape of Ursa Major
            was noticeably different, which was kind of fun. Proper motion data are
            relatively approximate, too.

            Bud

            On 11/02/2011 03:51 PM, Geoff Gaherty wrote:
            > On 02/11/11 4:04 PM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
            >> I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the
            >> Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC.
            >>
            >> The newer version, which I installed on my windows platform only went
            >> back to 99,999 BC.
            > I hope you realize that ALL planetarium software becomes increasingly
            > inaccurate as you travel to distant time periods. If the authors of
            > this software have reduced the time span covered, they probably did it
            > because the positions in distant time periods were too inaccurate to be
            > worth considering.
            >
            > Even over relatively short times, positions of small bodies such as
            > asteroids and comets are often wildly off because of perturbations to
            > their orbits by larger bodies. For example, Starry Night uses two
            > different sets of orbital elements for Comet Halley, using 1910 and 1986
            > epochs, because the orbits vary so much from one apparition to the next.
            > That's why programs like Starry Night download updated asteroid,
            > comet, and satellite orbits every few days.
            >
            > Geoff
            >
          • Fred Lieberman
            Hi Geoff, I agree with you. My only interest was to get an idea of what changes I would see in the constellations. Fred
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 3, 2011
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              Hi Geoff,

              I agree with you.

              My only interest was to get an idea of what changes I would see in the
              constellations.

              Fred


              On Wed, 2011-11-02 at 16:51 -0400, Geoff Gaherty wrote:
              > On 02/11/11 4:04 PM, Fred Lieberman wrote:
              > > I downloaded version 0.10.4 from the
              > > Ubuntu/linux site and it does go back to 999,999 BC.
              > >
              > > The newer version, which I installed on my windows platform only went
              > > back to 99,999 BC.
              >
              > I hope you realize that ALL planetarium software becomes increasingly
              > inaccurate as you travel to distant time periods. If the authors of
              > this software have reduced the time span covered, they probably did it
              > because the positions in distant time periods were too inaccurate to be
              > worth considering.
              >
              > Even over relatively short times, positions of small bodies such as
              > asteroids and comets are often wildly off because of perturbations to
              > their orbits by larger bodies. For example, Starry Night uses two
              > different sets of orbital elements for Comet Halley, using 1910 and 1986
              > epochs, because the orbits vary so much from one apparition to the next.
              > That's why programs like Starry Night download updated asteroid,
              > comet, and satellite orbits every few days.
              >
              > Geoff
              >
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