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Re: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter

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  • timavv@aol.com
    In a message dated 7/31/2006 1:09:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, erikdesonville@yahoo.com writes: Wunderground is an interesting site! Though apparently
    Message 1 of 29 , Aug 1, 2006
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      In a message dated 7/31/2006 1:09:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      erikdesonville@... writes:

      Wunderground is an interesting site! Though apparently (unless I
      overlook something) it only shows observed, past data for jetstream.



      That's correct, only past jetstream data are there. But if you animate the
      image you can get a pretty good idea of what's coming up for the next day or
      so.

      Tim


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • timavv@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/31/2006 1:09:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, erikdesonville@yahoo.com writes: I second Tim: strong jetstream invariably means mediocre to
      Message 2 of 29 , Aug 1, 2006
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        In a message dated 7/31/2006 1:09:58 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
        erikdesonville@... writes:

        I second Tim: strong jetstream invariably means mediocre to poor
        seeing (but the inverse is not necessarily true: jetstream absence is
        not a sufficient condition for good seeing).



        Right, I forgot to say that...in fact right now, according to the js map I
        ought to have good seeing. But it's terrible, probably because of convection
        from the hot surface. When the daytime temps are ~100, all bets are off.

        Tim


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Avnish
        In India, jupiter is still way up there . Seeing isnt that gr8. Once i couldnt go beyond 50X on a 5 f/8. Temeratures regularly go beyond 110*. Once, i was
        Message 3 of 29 , Aug 1, 2006
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          In India, jupiter is still "way up there". Seeing isnt that gr8. Once i couldnt go beyond 50X on a 5"f/8. Temeratures regularly go beyond 110*. Once, i was doin an experiment in school and it was 40.5*C inside so u cant spend more than 15mins observing without AC.

          Avnish
          Amateur Astronomer,
          28* 33' 06.14" N
          77* 14 ' 29.94" E
          New Delhi, India













          ----- Original Message ----
          From: bierbelly <tsteinberg1@...>
          To: telescopes@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2006 12:26:34 AM
          Subject: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter

          But it looks like tomorrow nite (8/1) might be a good one (seeing)
          for the first couple of hours in the evening, according to the CSC,
          but hot. I may just have to force myself to drag out my equipment,
          as we almost NEVER get a 4/5 seeing here in DE.

          Tom

          --- In telescopes@yahoogro ups.com, timavv@... wrote:
          >
          > Tom,
          >
          > The northeast US has notoriously bad seeing most of the time. I'm
          in Maryland, and I would guess my seeing is clouded or hazed out 60%
          of the time.
          >
          > Of the 40% that's left, half the time it's atrocious, not even
          worth setting up. If you can look up and see bright stars twinkling
          wildly, go inside and read a book. Or pull out your binoculars for
          low-power viewing....terrible seeing often occurs when the sky is
          the most transparent.
          >
          > Of the 20% that's now left, I'd guess I get moderate seeing for
          15%, good seeing 4%, and superb seeing 1% (maybe 1 or 2 nights per
          year). But it's important to note that a night of moderate seeing
          will have flashes of excellent seeing...keep your eye on the target
          for an hour and you will get several periods of 1 or 5 or 15 seconds
          where things quiet down and the details stop moving and snap into
          sharpness.
          >
          > I've found the position of the jet stream to be a fairly reliable
          indicator of what my seeing is going to be:
          >
          > http://www.wundergr ound.com/ US/Region/ US/2xpxJetStream .html
          >
          > Hope this helps,
          >
          > Tim
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: g2baraff@...
          > To: telescopes@yahoogro ups.com
          > Sent: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 9:36 AM
          > Subject: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter
          >
          >
          > --- In telescopes@yahoogro ups.com, "thomascolt9911" <tcolt@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I live in the northeast US and can not get Jupiter to come in
          clear.
          > > I think its because of how low it is and I'm looking through too
          > > much heat distoration. I have had the 8" dob all apart to clean
          it
          > > and I belive the com is corect just wondering how possible this
          is.
          > > Anybody up here seeing it the same way ? Tom Colt
          > > **********
          > > {Second attempt - Yahoo ate my first.]
          > I (North Central New Jersey) was out last night to study Jupiter
          for
          > the first time in about four months. The seeing WAS as bad as you
          > described. Time to say goodby to the king of the planets till next
          > year. It will only get worse from here on out.
          >
          > Gene Baraff
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          ___
          > Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures,
          email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >








          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • trebekjr
          On Cape Cod, 41-44-04 N., 70-10-31 W., I concur that seeing to observe Jupiter has been difficult for a month now, and maybe it s time to say goodbye to our
          Message 4 of 29 , Aug 1, 2006
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            On Cape Cod, 41-44-04 N., 70-10-31 W., I concur that seeing to
            observe Jupiter has been difficult for a month now, and maybe it's
            time to say goodbye to our friend for a season. However, August
            brings the meteor season, so we should look forward to that. [And my
            local club just got our 16-inch dob fixed :).

            Dave Dumas
            Scargo Hill, Cape Cod


            --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, Avnish <e_dmc2@...> wrote:
            >
            > In India, jupiter is still "way up there". Seeing isnt that gr8.
            Once i couldnt go beyond 50X on a 5"f/8. Temeratures regularly go
            beyond 110*. Once, i was doin an experiment in school and it was
            40.5*C inside so u cant spend more than 15mins observing without AC.
            >
            > Avnish
            > Amateur Astronomer,
            > 28* 33' 06.14" N
            > 77* 14 ' 29.94" E
            > New Delhi, India
            >
            > ----- Original Message ----
            > From: bierbelly <tsteinberg1@...>
            > To: telescopes@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2006 12:26:34 AM
            > Subject: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter
            >
            > But it looks like tomorrow nite (8/1)
            might be a good one (seeing)
            > for the first couple of hours in the evening, according to the
            CSC,
            > but hot. I may just have to force myself to drag out my
            equipment,
            > as we almost NEVER get a 4/5 seeing here in DE.
            >
            > Tom
            >
            > --- In telescopes@yahoogro ups.com, timavv@ wrote:
            > >
            > > Tom,
            > >
            > > The northeast US has notoriously bad seeing most of the time.
            I'm
            > in Maryland, and I would guess my seeing is clouded or hazed out
            60%
            > of the time.
            > >
            > > Of the 40% that's left, half the time it's atrocious, not even
            > worth setting up. If you can look up and see bright stars
            twinkling
            > wildly, go inside and read a book. Or pull out your binoculars
            for
            > low-power viewing....terrible seeing often occurs when the sky is
            > the most transparent.
            > >
            > > Of the 20% that's now left, I'd guess I get moderate seeing for
            > 15%, good seeing 4%, and superb seeing 1% (maybe 1 or 2 nights
            per
            > year). But it's important to note that a night of moderate
            seeing
            > will have flashes of excellent seeing...keep your eye on the
            target
            > for an hour and you will get several periods of 1 or 5 or 15
            seconds
            > where things quiet down and the details stop moving and snap into
            > sharpness.
            > >
            > > I've found the position of the jet stream to be a fairly
            reliable
            > indicator of what my seeing is going to be:
            > >
            > > http://www.wundergr ound.com/ US/Region/
            US/2xpxJetStream .html
            > >
            > > Hope this helps,
            > >
            > > Tim
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: g2baraff@
            > > To: telescopes@yahoogro ups.com
            > > Sent: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 9:36 AM
            > > Subject: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In telescopes@yahoogro ups.com, "thomascolt9911" <tcolt@>
            wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I live in the northeast US and can not get Jupiter to come in
            > clear.
            > > > I think its because of how low it is and I'm looking through
            too
            > > > much heat distoration. I have had the 8" dob all apart to
            clean
            > it
            > > > and I belive the com is corect just wondering how possible
            this
            > is.
            > > > Anybody up here seeing it the same way ? Tom Colt
            > > > **********
            > > > {Second attempt - Yahoo ate my first.]
            > > I (North Central New Jersey) was out last night to study
            Jupiter
            > for
            > > the first time in about four months. The seeing WAS as bad as
            you
            > > described. Time to say goodby to the king of the planets till
            next
            > > year. It will only get worse from here on out.
            > >
            > > Gene Baraff
          • deandddd
            Tim, I think that you´ll have to take two day trips out to West Virginia to the mountains. Dean ... in Maryland, and I would guess my seeing is clouded or
            Message 5 of 29 , Aug 1, 2006
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              Tim,

              I think that you´ll have to take two day trips out to West Virginia
              to the mountains.

              Dean



              --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, timavv@... wrote:
              >
              > Tom,
              >
              > The northeast US has notoriously bad seeing most of the time. I'm
              in Maryland, and I would guess my seeing is clouded or hazed out 60%
              of the time.
              >
              > Of the 40% that's left, half the time it's atrocious, not even
              worth setting up. If you can look up and see bright stars twinkling
              wildly, go inside and read a book. Or pull out your binoculars for
              low-power viewing....terrible seeing often occurs when the sky is the
              most transparent.
              >
              > Of the 20% that's now left, I'd guess I get moderate seeing for
              15%, good seeing 4%, and superb seeing 1% (maybe 1 or 2 nights per
              year). But it's important to note that a night of moderate seeing
              will have flashes of excellent seeing...keep your eye on the target
              for an hour and you will get several periods of 1 or 5 or 15 seconds
              where things quiet down and the details stop moving and snap into
              sharpness.
              >
              > I've found the position of the jet stream to be a fairly reliable
              indicator of what my seeing is going to be:
              >
              > http://www.wunderground.com/US/Region/US/2xpxJetStream.html
              >
              > Hope this helps,
              >
              > Tim
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: g2baraff@...
              > To: telescopes@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 9:36 AM
              > Subject: [Telescopes] Re: Jupiter
              >
              >
              > --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "thomascolt9911" <tcolt@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I live in the northeast US and can not get Jupiter to come in
              clear.
              > > I think its because of how low it is and I'm looking through too
              > > much heat distoration. I have had the 8" dob all apart to clean it
              > > and I belive the com is corect just wondering how possible this
              is.
              > > Anybody up here seeing it the same way ? Tom Colt
              > > **********
              > > {Second attempt - Yahoo ate my first.]
              > I (North Central New Jersey) was out last night to study Jupiter
              for
              > the first time in about four months. The seeing WAS as bad as you
              > described. Time to say goodby to the king of the planets till next
              > year. It will only get worse from here on out.
              >
              > Gene Baraff
              >
              >
              >
              >
              ______________________________________________________________________
              __
              > Check out AOL.com today. Breaking news, video search, pictures,
              email and IM. All on demand. Always Free.
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net
              Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5 f/4 to 135x with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up If not I will reduce
              Message 6 of 29 , Aug 27, 2006
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                Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5" f/4 to 135x with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up

                If not I will reduce it to 90x, I also have the shorty barlow

                This will be my first oppurtunity to use either of them, cloud cover permitting of course

                (forgot to mention Jupiter will be the subject, all other planets being below my viewing horizon)

                David


                Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.
              • Wayne G
                5. Jupiter Posted by: sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net Date: Sun Aug 27, 2006 2:54 pm (PDT) Tonight I will attempt to push the
                Message 7 of 29 , Aug 28, 2006
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                  5. Jupiter
                  Posted by: "sanddollar@..."
                  sanddollar@...
                  Date: Sun Aug 27, 2006 2:54 pm (PDT)


                  Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5" f/4 to 135x
                  with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up

                  [WG:] Have to tell you David that a lot depends on the sky seeing
                  conditions, so don't put too much stock in the views and condemn
                  anything, if the views aren't very good tonight. But your scope at f/4
                  probably isn't a good choice to push beyond a 1mm exit pupil, even if it
                  is super well collimated, and I cannot speak for the quality of the
                  Orion barlow. Sounds like your scope is more of a richest field?



                  If not I will reduce it to 90x, I also have the shorty barlow

                  This will be my first oppurtunity to use either of them, cloud cover
                  permitting of course

                  (forgot to mention Jupiter will be the subject, all other planets being
                  below my viewing horizon)

                  [WG:] Jupiter is well past the point now where you are likely to get
                  any decent viewing of it in any telescope again this year. Better
                  target now: the Moon.



                  David


                  Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.



                  WayneG

                  Sent from my homebuilt custom-desktop computer. :)
                • sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net
                  Thanks, both barlows seem to work fine from my limited perspective of having nothing to compare them to. David Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld. ...
                  Message 8 of 29 , Aug 28, 2006
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                    Thanks, both barlows seem to work fine from my limited perspective of having nothing to compare them to.

                    David


                    Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: "Wayne G" <fomalhaut@...>
                    Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2006 11:58:04
                    To:"telescopes" <telescopes@yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: [Telescopes] RE: Jupiter




                    5. Jupiter
                    Posted by: "sanddollar@..."
                    sanddollar@...
                    Date: Sun Aug 27, 2006 2:54 pm (PDT)


                    Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5" f/4 to 135x
                    with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up

                    [WG:] Have to tell you David that a lot depends on the sky seeing
                    conditions, so don't put too much stock in the views and condemn
                    anything, if the views aren't very good tonight. But your scope at f/4
                    probably isn't a good choice to push beyond a 1mm exit pupil, even if it
                    is super well collimated, and I cannot speak for the quality of the
                    Orion barlow. Sounds like your scope is more of a richest field?



                    If not I will reduce it to 90x, I also have the shorty barlow

                    This will be my first oppurtunity to use either of them, cloud cover
                    permitting of course

                    (forgot to mention Jupiter will be the subject, all other planets being
                    below my viewing horizon)

                    [WG:] Jupiter is well past the point now where you are likely to get
                    any decent viewing of it in any telescope again this year. Better
                    target now: the Moon.



                    David


                    Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.



                    WayneG

                    Sent from my homebuilt custom-desktop computer. :)













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                  • sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net
                    Yes, rich field, 3.1 degree field with my lowest power eyepiece which I have used to scan the milky way But the best contrast I have found is to slip in the
                    Message 9 of 29 , Aug 28, 2006
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                      Yes, rich field, 3.1 degree field with my lowest power eyepiece which I have used to scan the milky way

                      But the best contrast I have found is to slip in the shorty barlow ahead of the 25mm Kellner which gives 36x, the background sky darkens a lot more than at 18x

                      I have found this is the preferably magnification for most open clusters, nebulas, larger Messier objects in general.

                      David


                      Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: "Wayne G" <fomalhaut@...>
                      Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2006 11:58:04
                      To:"telescopes" <telescopes@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [Telescopes] RE: Jupiter




                      5. Jupiter
                      Posted by: "sanddollar@..."
                      sanddollar@...
                      Date: Sun Aug 27, 2006 2:54 pm (PDT)


                      Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5" f/4 to 135x
                      with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up

                      [WG:] Have to tell you David that a lot depends on the sky seeing
                      conditions, so don't put too much stock in the views and condemn
                      anything, if the views aren't very good tonight. But your scope at f/4
                      probably isn't a good choice to push beyond a 1mm exit pupil, even if it
                      is super well collimated, and I cannot speak for the quality of the
                      Orion barlow. Sounds like your scope is more of a richest field?



                      If not I will reduce it to 90x, I also have the shorty barlow

                      This will be my first oppurtunity to use either of them, cloud cover
                      permitting of course

                      (forgot to mention Jupiter will be the subject, all other planets being
                      below my viewing horizon)

                      [WG:] Jupiter is well past the point now where you are likely to get
                      any decent viewing of it in any telescope again this year. Better
                      target now: the Moon.



                      David


                      Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.



                      WayneG

                      Sent from my homebuilt custom-desktop computer. :)













                      You are subscribed to the "Talking Telescopes" e-mail discussion group. To unsubscribe from this group, send an e-mail to:
                      telescopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                    • sanddollar@tmo.blackberry.net
                      Here is the bottom line on the scope... 114mm, f/4 Got it on sale through Orion for $255.95, goto SkyAlign which works like a charm, 10mm and 25mm
                      Message 10 of 29 , Aug 28, 2006
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                        Here is the bottom line on the scope...

                        114mm, f/4

                        Got it on sale through Orion for $255.95, goto SkyAlign which works like a charm, 10mm and 25mm Kellners, they even included a copy of Starry Night CDROM which I have seen around for $50.

                        Price shipped to my door was $273.85

                        I do believe I got my moneys worth the first night out.

                        Open clusters are simply beautiful, I can see nebulosity in the Lagoon, the Swan is visible, much more.

                        I cannot resolve globulars, but they are clear otherwise with averted vision.

                        All this under fairly heavy suburban light wash out.

                        I am having great fun with it and the goto is heaven on earth, as I usually don't have all night to hunt things down.

                        When I drop in the 18x eyepiece I have over a 3 degree field of view, a mounted 114mm monocular for intents and purposes.

                        I want more aperture in time, but for now, I am greatly enjoying the views.

                        I feel I got a bargain, and 100x or under the images are very crisp.

                        David


                        Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: "Wayne G" <fomalhaut@...>
                        Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2006 11:58:04
                        To:"telescopes" <telescopes@yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: [Telescopes] RE: Jupiter




                        5. Jupiter
                        Posted by: "sanddollar@..."
                        sanddollar@...
                        Date: Sun Aug 27, 2006 2:54 pm (PDT)


                        Tonight I will attempt to push the magnification of the 4.5" f/4 to 135x
                        with the Orion TriMag barlow, just to see if the image holds up

                        [WG:] Have to tell you David that a lot depends on the sky seeing
                        conditions, so don't put too much stock in the views and condemn
                        anything, if the views aren't very good tonight. But your scope at f/4
                        probably isn't a good choice to push beyond a 1mm exit pupil, even if it
                        is super well collimated, and I cannot speak for the quality of the
                        Orion barlow. Sounds like your scope is more of a richest field?



                        If not I will reduce it to 90x, I also have the shorty barlow

                        This will be my first oppurtunity to use either of them, cloud cover
                        permitting of course

                        (forgot to mention Jupiter will be the subject, all other planets being
                        below my viewing horizon)

                        [WG:] Jupiter is well past the point now where you are likely to get
                        any decent viewing of it in any telescope again this year. Better
                        target now: the Moon.



                        David


                        Sent from my BlackBerry wireless handheld.



                        WayneG

                        Sent from my homebuilt custom-desktop computer. :)













                        You are subscribed to the "Talking Telescopes" e-mail discussion group. To unsubscribe from this group, send an e-mail to:
                        telescopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        Yahoo! Groups Links
                      • Geoff Gaherty
                        ... This is the Celestron version of the Orion StarBlast, very highly regarded by many on this forum. Despite being a rich field design, it takes medium
                        Message 11 of 29 , Aug 29, 2006
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                          sanddollar@... wrote:

                          > Here is the bottom line on the scope...
                          >
                          > 114mm, f/4
                          >
                          > Got it on sale through Orion for $255.95, goto SkyAlign which works like a
                          > charm, 10mm and 25mm Kellners, they even included a copy of Starry Night
                          > CDROM which I have seen around for $50.

                          This is the Celestron version of the Orion StarBlast, very highly regarded by
                          many on this forum. Despite being a "rich field" design, it takes medium
                          magnifications very well, thanks to its parabolic mirror and generally good
                          optics. I found mine gave nice crisp views up to about 115x, while also
                          offering spectacular wide-field views. Quite versatile and excellent value for
                          the money.

                          Geoff

                          --
                          Geoff Gaherty
                          Foxmead Observatory
                          Coldwater, Ontario, Canada
                          http://www.gaherty.ca
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