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Re: I could use a few opinions here

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  • John Bambury
    ... too ... Radians ... than ... many ... your ... Taras, I would forget about the TV Panoptics as the eye-relief in all of the 1.25 barrel Panoptics
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 1, 2006
      --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "Taras" <nuscorpii223@y...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm planning to buy some long overdue high end eyepieces for my ten-
      > inch F/4.5 and my 4.25-inch F/4 Dobs in the near future. I have
      > Kellners which I haven't been using for a long time now, and my
      > Orthoscopics though sharp really leave a lot to be desired for deep
      > sky objects due to their narrow apparent fields of view. The same
      > Orthos do however work wonders on the planets, I can see easily the
      > subtle colors in Saturn's rings and on Mars too.
      >
      > I primarily look at galaxies and nebulae, but when the skies are
      too
      > hazy for them, I look at the planets, double stars and the moon too
      > from the house. What sort of eyepieces would you reccomend? I was
      > thinking about purchasing either Vixen Superwides, which have 65
      > degree apparent fields of view, or a combination of Tele Vue
      Radians
      > and Panoptics, which have apparent fields of view of 60 and 68
      > degrees respectively. I would also prefer to not spend much more
      than
      > 250 bucks per eyepiece, if at all possible. I wear glasses and it
      > would help if I don't have to take them off and put them on again
      > everytime I want to look into the eyepiece. At the same time, I do
      > not have a clock drive, and I have to observe at high power for
      many
      > of the galaxies and nebulae I look at. Thank you in advance for
      your
      > assistance.
      >
      > Taras

      Taras,

      I would forget about the TV Panoptics as the eye-relief in all of the
      1.25" barrel Panoptics (including the 22mm dual barrel design) is too
      short for eyeglass wearers.

      This leaves you to select between TV Radians and Vixen Lanthanum
      Wides, with the other long eye-relief eyepieces, the Pentax XW's
      being outside your budget.

      Between the Radians and Vixen's its 6 of 1, 1/2 a dozen of the other.
      The Radians are smaller, lighter and "possibly" a tad sharper, thats
      questionable. The Vixen LVW's offer the benefit of fitting either
      a 1.25" focuser or 2" focuser and have a slightly larger AFOV.

      Really, in terms of long eye-relief eyepieces they are both
      outstanding and you would be very happy whichever way you went, I
      actually like the Vixen's marginally over the Radians. Mechanically
      however, the Radians may in fact be a better choice given the
      scopes you have as they are smaller and lighter and will cause
      less of a balance issue in the small dob.

      Clear Skies
      John Bambury
    • alannasu
      Hello. May I suggest an alternative: Speers-WALER eyepieces (Speers = name of inventor; WALER = Wide Angle Long Eye Relief):
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 1, 2006
        Hello.

        May I suggest an alternative:
        Speers-WALER eyepieces (Speers = name of inventor; WALER = Wide
        Angle Long Eye Relief):
        http://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/g/a/gag1/speers10.html

        --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "John Bambury" <jbambury@b...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "Taras" <nuscorpii223@y...>
        wrote:
        > >
        > > I'm planning to buy some long overdue high end eyepieces for my
        ten-
        > > inch F/4.5 and my 4.25-inch F/4 Dobs in the near future. I have
        > > Kellners which I haven't been using for a long time now, and my
        > > Orthoscopics though sharp really leave a lot to be desired for
        deep
        > > sky objects due to their narrow apparent fields of view. The
        same
        > > Orthos do however work wonders on the planets, I can see easily
        the
        > > subtle colors in Saturn's rings and on Mars too.
        > >
        > > I primarily look at galaxies and nebulae, but when the skies are
        > too
        > > hazy for them, I look at the planets, double stars and the moon
        too
        > > from the house. What sort of eyepieces would you reccomend? I
        was
        > > thinking about purchasing either Vixen Superwides, which have 65
        > > degree apparent fields of view, or a combination of Tele Vue
        > Radians
        > > and Panoptics, which have apparent fields of view of 60 and 68
        > > degrees respectively. I would also prefer to not spend much more
        > than
        > > 250 bucks per eyepiece, if at all possible. I wear glasses and
        it
        > > would help if I don't have to take them off and put them on
        again
        > > everytime I want to look into the eyepiece. At the same time, I
        do
        > > not have a clock drive, and I have to observe at high power for
        > many
        > > of the galaxies and nebulae I look at. Thank you in advance for
        > your
        > > assistance.
        > >
        > > Taras
        >
        > Taras,
        >
        > I would forget about the TV Panoptics as the eye-relief in all of
        the
        > 1.25" barrel Panoptics (including the 22mm dual barrel design) is
        too
        > short for eyeglass wearers.
        >
        > This leaves you to select between TV Radians and Vixen Lanthanum
        > Wides, with the other long eye-relief eyepieces, the Pentax XW's
        > being outside your budget.
        >
        > Between the Radians and Vixen's its 6 of 1, 1/2 a dozen of the
        other.
        > The Radians are smaller, lighter and "possibly" a tad sharper,
        thats
        > questionable. The Vixen LVW's offer the benefit of fitting either
        > a 1.25" focuser or 2" focuser and have a slightly larger AFOV.
        >
        > Really, in terms of long eye-relief eyepieces they are both
        > outstanding and you would be very happy whichever way you went, I
        > actually like the Vixen's marginally over the Radians. Mechanically
        > however, the Radians may in fact be a better choice given the
        > scopes you have as they are smaller and lighter and will cause
        > less of a balance issue in the small dob.
        >
        > Clear Skies
        > John Bambury
        >
      • Taras
        ... ten- ... deep ... the ... too ... do ... the ... too ... other. ... thats ... I have tried a couple of Panoptics and agree with you about the eye relief,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 1, 2006
          --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "John Bambury" <jbambury@b...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "Taras" <nuscorpii223@y...>
          wrote:
          > >
          > > I'm planning to buy some long overdue high end eyepieces for my
          ten-
          > > inch F/4.5 and my 4.25-inch F/4 Dobs in the near future. I have
          > > Kellners which I haven't been using for a long time now, and my
          > > Orthoscopics though sharp really leave a lot to be desired for
          deep
          > > sky objects due to their narrow apparent fields of view. The same
          > > Orthos do however work wonders on the planets, I can see easily
          the
          > > subtle colors in Saturn's rings and on Mars too.
          > >
          > > I primarily look at galaxies and nebulae, but when the skies are
          > too
          > > hazy for them, I look at the planets, double stars and the moon
          too
          > > from the house. What sort of eyepieces would you reccomend? I was
          > > thinking about purchasing either Vixen Superwides, which have 65
          > > degree apparent fields of view, or a combination of Tele Vue
          > Radians
          > > and Panoptics, which have apparent fields of view of 60 and 68
          > > degrees respectively. I would also prefer to not spend much more
          > than
          > > 250 bucks per eyepiece, if at all possible. I wear glasses and it
          > > would help if I don't have to take them off and put them on again
          > > everytime I want to look into the eyepiece. At the same time, I
          do
          > > not have a clock drive, and I have to observe at high power for
          > many
          > > of the galaxies and nebulae I look at. Thank you in advance for
          > your
          > > assistance.
          > >
          > > Taras
          >
          > Taras,
          >
          > I would forget about the TV Panoptics as the eye-relief in all of
          the
          > 1.25" barrel Panoptics (including the 22mm dual barrel design) is
          too
          > short for eyeglass wearers.
          >
          > This leaves you to select between TV Radians and Vixen Lanthanum
          > Wides, with the other long eye-relief eyepieces, the Pentax XW's
          > being outside your budget.
          >
          > Between the Radians and Vixen's its 6 of 1, 1/2 a dozen of the
          other.
          > The Radians are smaller, lighter and "possibly" a tad sharper,
          thats
          > questionable. The Vixen LVW's offer the benefit of fitting either
          > a 1.25" focuser or 2" focuser and have a slightly larger AFOV.
          >
          > Really, in terms of long eye-relief eyepieces they are both
          > outstanding and you would be very happy whichever way you went, I
          > actually like the Vixen's marginally over the Radians. Mechanically
          > however, the Radians may in fact be a better choice given the
          > scopes you have as they are smaller and lighter and will cause
          > less of a balance issue in the small dob.
          >
          > Clear Skies
          > John Bambury
          >

          I have tried a couple of Panoptics and agree with you about the eye
          relief, it's amazingly short for the 24mm, and I've heard the 15mm
          model's even worse. The low power two inch models are great, but I
          feel they are too costly for me and they won't fit my smaller
          telescopes either.

          Though my eyesight is not so bad I must use glasses at all times,
          it's not a good thing to have to put on and remove your glasses in
          the dark, as I dropped them in the grass a couple of times and nearly
          stepped on them. I have tried an 18mm Radian and though I can do
          without the adjustable eyeguard, I liked it's image quality. Even at
          F/4 it can hold it's own even around the edges. Since one of my
          telescopes is on the large side, and the other two are home built out
          of wood, I can fix any balance issues without difficulty. I'll just
          get some more hardwood and fire up my powertools to make a balancer,
          or just add weight in the rear cap of the tube. As for which one I'll
          purchase, I'm leaning towards whichever one is more available.

          Taras
        • tdcarls
          As long as you don t have astigmatism, it s not necessary to use glasses while observing. If you only have near or far-sightedness, attach a strap to your
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 1, 2006
            As long as you don't have astigmatism, it's not necessary to use
            glasses while observing. If you only have near or far-sightedness,
            attach a strap to your glasses and let them hang from your neck when
            you look through the ep and adjust the focuser accordingly.

            Todd


            > Though my eyesight is not so bad I must use glasses at all times,
            > it's not a good thing to have to put on and remove your glasses in
            > the dark, as I dropped them in the grass a couple of times and
            nearly stepped on them.
          • Jim Brand
            Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 06:40:56 -0000 From: Taras Subject: I could use a few opinions here I m planning to buy some long overdue
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 1, 2006
              Date: Sun, 01 Jan 2006 06:40:56 -0000
              From: "Taras" <nuscorpii223@...>
              Subject: I could use a few opinions here

              I'm planning to buy some long overdue high end eyepieces for my ten-
              inch F/4.5 and my 4.25-inch F/4 Dobs in the near future. I have
              Kellners which I haven't been using for a long time now, and my
              Orthoscopics though sharp really leave a lot to be desired for deep
              sky objects due to their narrow apparent fields of view. The same
              Orthos do however work wonders on the planets, I can see easily the
              subtle colors in Saturn's rings and on Mars too.

              I primarily look at galaxies and nebulae, but when the skies are too
              hazy for them, I look at the planets, double stars and the moon too
              from the house. What sort of eyepieces would you reccomend? I was
              thinking about purchasing either Vixen Superwides, which have 65
              degree apparent fields of view, or a combination of Tele Vue Radians
              and Panoptics, which have apparent fields of view of 60 and 68
              degrees respectively. I would also prefer to not spend much more than
              250 bucks per eyepiece, if at all possible. I wear glasses and it
              would help if I don't have to take them off and put them on again
              everytime I want to look into the eyepiece. At the same time, I do
              not have a clock drive, and I have to observe at high power for many
              of the galaxies and nebulae I look at. Thank you in advance for your
              assistance.

              Taras

              ---------------------------------------------------------
              I would take a good hard look at the pentax xl or xw eyepieces used on
              astromart. They seem to go (XLs anyway) in about the 180-220 dollar
              range. I have serveral, the 14mm and the 10mm (XL) are are just
              *outstanding* eyepeices. I too wear glasses, and have not trouble with
              these - I think they are specced at 20mm of eye relief. 65 degrees for
              xl and 70 degrees for xw.

              Above above the 21mm, some folks, in some scopes have reported some
              field curvature - this does not bother me at all. In the shorter
              lengths, this not an issue.

              Hope this helps.

              Jim
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