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Re: Hello to everyone.

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  • John Bambury
    ... Car, Just to reinforce Geoff s comments. His advise is exactly what I would have said to you. Put the dob on a little dolley or use a 2 wheel hand cart
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 1, 2004
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      --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "car19472001" <car19472001@y...>
      wrote:
      > I do have a xt10 dob,57 yr on top,and a bothersome back condition.
      > I been thinking about buying a SkyView Pro 120mm EQ Refractor .Does
      > this refrac truly outperform the xt10 ?
      > I will really appreciate any input.Again,thank you.
      > Car.

      Car,

      Just to reinforce Geoff's comments. His advise is exactly what I
      would have said to you. Put the dob on a little dolley or use a 2
      wheel hand cart to wheel it around. No matter which way you point it
      twist it or turn it, the 5" refractor is no match on any target for
      the 10" dob, "chalk and cheese" as us colonials would say.

      Clear Skies
      John Bambury
    • Jack Kramer
      From: Gregg ... I have used a Bogen tripod with fluid head for small telescopes. It moved very smoothly, but because of the fluid
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 1, 2004
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        From: "Gregg" <starryskyn@...>
        > I do not understand how a fluid ball head could work on a heavy scope
        > if the center of balance on the head/scope combo is above the point
        > of motion. It will try to flop over all the time. Tracking any star
        > motion is not very easy at all.

        I have used a Bogen tripod with fluid head for small telescopes. It moved very smoothly, but because of the fluid dampened head, there was some backlash once released as an object was in the field of view. Moreover, the whole system was off balance when looking at objects at high altitude, necessitating tightening down on the lock knobs. This worked in a pinch for very small scopes. I also once used it with a 6" Mak-Cass and it was tolerable up to about 30 degrees, but much above that it was terrible. As others have said, typical camera-type tripod heads simply do not work well for telescopes, especially larger ones.

        Jack Kramer
        Lily Lake, Illinois
        http://home.att.net/~jak.stargate/wsb/index.html
      • c8imager
        ... ... condition. ... Refractor .Does ... it ... for ... Car: Just to reinforce John s comments, many years (ok, decades) ago I had a 10
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 1, 2004
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          --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "John Bambury" <jbambury@b...>
          wrote:
          > --- In telescopes@yahoogroups.com, "car19472001"
          <car19472001@y...>
          > wrote:
          > > I do have a xt10 dob,57 yr on top,and a bothersome back
          condition.
          > > I been thinking about buying a SkyView Pro 120mm EQ
          Refractor .Does
          > > this refrac truly outperform the xt10 ?
          > > I will really appreciate any input.Again,thank you.
          > > Car.
          >
          > Car,
          >
          > Just to reinforce Geoff's comments. His advise is exactly what I
          > would have said to you. Put the dob on a little dolley or use a 2
          > wheel hand cart to wheel it around. No matter which way you point
          it
          > twist it or turn it, the 5" refractor is no match on any target
          for
          > the 10" dob, "chalk and cheese" as us colonials would say.
          >
          > Clear Skies
          > John Bambury


          Car:
          Just to reinforce John's comments, many years (ok, decades) ago I
          had a 10" newt with a rather average Coulter mirror. One memorable
          night I put it up against a much-vaunted Questar 3.5. After about
          an hour of comparion observing, the Questar owner quietly packed it
          in and went home. If the aperture is somewhat close, a good
          refractor can often get by on contrast, but when there is a
          significant aperture disparity, the light bucket almost always wins.

          Jeff
        • Jerome Bigge
          ... There is a trick that may work for some. Rotate the tripod head as if you were going to take a vertical and mount the telescope that way. Then the
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 1, 2004
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            On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 09:17:54 -0500, you wrote:

            >From: "Gregg" <starryskyn@...>
            >> I do not understand how a fluid ball head could work on a heavy scope
            >> if the center of balance on the head/scope combo is above the point
            >> of motion. It will try to flop over all the time. Tracking any star
            >> motion is not very easy at all.
            >
            >I have used a Bogen tripod with fluid head for small telescopes. It moved very smoothly, but because of the fluid dampened head, there was some backlash once released as an object was in the field of view. Moreover, the whole system was off balance when looking at objects at high altitude, necessitating tightening down on the lock knobs. This worked in a pinch for very small scopes. I also once used it with a 6" Mak-Cass and it was tolerable up to about 30 degrees, but much above that it was terrible. As others have said, typical camera-type tripod heads simply do not work well for telescopes, especially larger ones.
            >
            >Jack Kramer
            >Lily Lake, Illinois
            >http://home.att.net/~jak.stargate/wsb/index.html

            There is a "trick" that may work for
            some. Rotate the tripod head as
            if you were going to take a vertical
            and mount the telescope that way.
            Then the telescope is rotating more
            along an axis instead of being more
            off balance as it is mounted the usual
            way. Works OK with my 80f5, but my
            Celestron 102f5 was a bit too heavy.
            For the Celestron I have an EQ-2 set
            in "alt-az" so that RA now rotates the
            telescope horizontally, while DEC is
            used for vertical movements. For
            binoculars I mount them on the tripod
            in the standard position, but tilt the
            tripod back so that the forward leg
            is off the ground with the binoculars
            resting against my face. Not quite
            as steady as the usual way, but is
            great when looking at objects more
            than 45 degrees above the horizon.

            Jerome Bigge
            Member, Muskegon Astronomical Society
            Author of the "Warlady" & "Wartime" series.
            Download at "http://members.tripod.com/~jbigge"
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