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[techbooks] REVIEW: "Apple Confidential", Owen W. Linzmayer

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  • Rob Slade, doting grandpa of Ryan and Tr
    BKAPLCNF.RVW 991229 Apple Confidential , Owen W. Linzmayer, 1999, 1-886411-28-X, U$17.95/C$27.95 %A Owen W. Linzmayer owl@bigfoot.com %C 555 De Haro
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 11, 2000
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      BKAPLCNF.RVW 991229

      "Apple Confidential", Owen W. Linzmayer, 1999, 1-886411-28-X,
      U$17.95/C$27.95
      %A Owen W. Linzmayer owl@...
      %C 555 De Haro Street, Suite 250, San Francisco, CA 94107
      %D 1999
      %G 1-886411-28-X
      %I No Starch Press
      %O U$17.95/C$27.95 415-863-9900 fax 415-863-9950 info@...
      %P 268 p.
      %T "Apple Confidential: The Real Story of Apple Computer, Inc."

      Whether you use a Mac, PC, Linux box, big iron, or no computer at all
      you'll find something to read, and probably chuckle over, in this
      book. Linzmayer has a history of the Macintosh (and some other boxes,
      as well) packed with personalities, quotes, trivia, timelines, tables,
      and more. You can read, dip, or browse as you please.

      Of course, your pleasure may be just slightly tempered if you have
      also read "The Mac Bathroom Reader" (cf BKMCBTRM.RVW) by the same
      author, and published a few years back by Sybex Computer Books. A
      footnote to the introduction states that some material in "Apple
      Confidential" was originally published in "The Mac Bathroom Reader"
      but, while the material is not identical, it is strikingly similar. A
      great deal of content is repeated verbatim, with only some formatting
      changes.

      It's sometimes hard to say that a particular chapter has a topic, but
      along the way, you'll meet the forgotten co-founder of Apple, short-
      sighted companies, code names, the Apple, Apple][, Apple III, the Mac,
      NeXT, Lisa, 1984, Lemmings, Bill Gates, John Sculley, dumb users, and
      the insiders.

      Historical content, of course, does not go out of date, and there has
      been some attempt to add chapters on later material. This latter
      content is very different from the earlier stories, though.
      Personalities are much more distant, and the narratives are much less
      confidential, tending to be compilations of speeches, marketing
      announcements, and annual reports. The latter chapters are a handy
      reference to developments at Apple, but they simply don't have the
      life of the earlier content.

      The new format is not quite as easy to follow as the old. Quotations
      and marginal notes are more extensive, with the margins now occupying
      almost half the page. The constant need to flip back and forth
      between the main text and the sidebars (and the marginal material is
      often necessary if you really want to understand the main narrative)
      makes the book much harder to read than it might have been otherwise.

      For those new to the story of Apple, this is a good recounting of the
      early days, and a factbook of the history of the corporation and its
      machines.

      copyright Robert M. Slade, 1999 BKAPLCNF.RVW 991229

      ====================== (quote inserted randomly by Pegasus Mailer)
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      I know that there are people in this world who do not love their
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      http://victoria.tc.ca/techrev or http://sun.soci.niu.edu/~rslade
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