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RE: [tec-scopes] Lasik and astronomy

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  • fl.lusen
    Evan, Before getting laser surgery, I would look into the astigmatic correction lens accessories offered by TeleVue. Al was showing them at this years Texas
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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      Evan,

      Before getting laser surgery, I would look into the astigmatic correction
      lens accessories offered by TeleVue. Al was showing them at this years
      Texas Star Party and I think he sold every one he brought. I have heard and
      read some not so good to very bad reviews of laser surgery and astronomy.

      Fred

      -----Original Message-----
      From: tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com]On
      Behalf Of echan1127
      Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 1:45 AM
      To: tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [tec-scopes] Lasik and astronomy

      Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this topic.
      Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more planetary
      details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking them off
      to observe. I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got contact (toric)
      lenses. However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye to the
      point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the directions) for two
      days.

      Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes.

      The big question - will it affect planetary observing?

      -Evan







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    • jimhp29401us
      Hi Evan, The good thing for us four eyes guys is that, except for astigmatism, the scope will compensate. I cannot see how laser surgery would have any
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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        Hi Evan,
        The good thing for us "four eyes" guys is that, except for
        astigmatism, the scope will compensate. I cannot see how laser surgery
        would have any effect on observing other than correcting your
        astigmatism. So,it should be a positive move. Check with your
        Opthalmologist. Does anyone have any experience with this?

        Jim Phillips


        > Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this topic.
        > Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more
        planetary
        > details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking them
        off
        > to observe. I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got contact
        (toric)
        > lenses. However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye to
        the
        > point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the directions)
        for two
        > days.
        >
        > Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes.
        >
        > The big question - will it affect planetary observing?
        >
        > -Evan
      • Joe Labrecque
        Hi Evan, I have had the Lasik surgery done and have a number of issues concerning it. First, it s completely remarkable how well I can see without glasses or
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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          Hi Evan, I have had the Lasik surgery done and have a number of issues concerning it. First, it's completely remarkable how well I can see without glasses or contacts. I now use reading glasses only for fine detail work and prolonged reading. I was already wearing bifocal lenses and the need for trifocal was at hand. Second, while under normal lighting conditions I am very pleased with the results, I am not  completely satisfied with my vision under dim light conditions.  With my right eye I have a residual halo effect that is very minor and only noticeable under dim light conditions.   With my left eye I have a minor split vision effect that is hard to describe. 
           
          If you were to take 2 letter H's and overlay them perfectly. Then move 1 of the H's slightly up so the horizontal segment is barely above the underlying H. This makes a fair representation of what I see.  Again this condition is only noticeable under very dim light conditions.
           
          Under normal light conditions neither of these are a problem and even under dim light they only cause a minor distraction. I don't think it affects my ability to focus or to see details while at the telescope.  When out with friends, the details that they see with their good eyes doesn't seem to be any different than the details I can see.
           
          The only thing that it does seem to affect is when I am using my red dot finder scope 
          to locate an object. Since I now have a goto system that is working really well this isn't a problem anymore.
           
          If I were able to make the decision over again I'm not sure that I would option for the surgery. Knowing what I now know, I may have tried trifocals before having surgery.  My options at the time were to start carrying 2 pairs of glasses so that I can see under all conditions or to go to trifocal lenses. I am not a vain person and my reasons for having the surgery was not spawned from vanity but from a desire to not go to trifocal and to not have to carry 2 pairs of glasses everywhere.
           
          I'm not sure if this information is helpful to you. If you have questions or would like to discuss it more I would glad to chat with you.  
           
          -Joe- 
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: echan1127
          Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 2:45 AM
          Subject: [tec-scopes] Lasik and astronomy

          Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this topic. 
          Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more planetary
          details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking them off
          to observe.  I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got contact (toric)
          lenses.  However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye to the
          point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the directions) for two
          days.   

          Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes. 

          The big question - will it affect planetary observing?

          -Evan



        • Opticks5@AOL.com
          Hi I had Lasik for both eyes. went from about 20/400 to 20/15.mild to zero astigmatism. Every thing is better including planets except some glare around
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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            Hi
              I had Lasik for both eyes. went from about 20/400 to 20/15.mild to zero astigmatism. Every thing is better including planets except some glare around brighter objects especially pinpoint objects stars and naked eye planets. Overall it is a home run but for astronomy only a double or triple. It eliminates most eyepiece ER problems and fogging the glasses in the winter or finding the glasses to read star maps, record your observations. The doctor noted that I have large 7.2mm pupils for my age 44 at that time and adapted the procedure to compensate. But I still have some added glare starting when my pupil goes from just under 5 mm and larger. The procedure has been improved and is better. I went to a doctor who only does Lasik and should be among the best. he also had fairly long steady track record with better avg results. Do the research! Your mileage may vary!
              Jimmy Kay 140 #135
            PS I believe but can't prove I see slightly finer details on the planets. The big limiting factor is lousy viewing, usually jet stream related on long Island NY
          • echan1127
            How about for deep sky? Pinpoint stars against a dark background - does this cause any problems for people who have had lasik? Thank you all for the feedback.
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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              How about for deep sky? Pinpoint stars against a dark background -
              does this cause any problems for people who have had lasik?

              Thank you all for the feedback. It seems like it isn't the slam-
              dunk that I thought it'd be...

              -Evan

              --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, Opticks5@A... wrote:
              > Hi
              > I had Lasik for both eyes. went from about 20/400 to 20/15.mild
              to zero
              > astigmatism. Every thing is better including planets except some
              glare around
              > brighter objects especially pinpoint objects stars and naked eye
              planets.
              > Overall it is a home run but for astronomy only a double or
              triple. It eliminates
              > most eyepiece ER problems and fogging the glasses in the winter
              or finding
              > the glasses to read star maps, record your observations. The
              doctor noted that
              > I have large 7.2mm pupils for my age 44 at that time and adapted
              the
              > procedure to compensate. But I still have some added glare
              starting when my pupil
              > goes from just under 5 mm and larger. The procedure has been
              improved and is
              > better. I went to a doctor who only does Lasik and should be
              among the best. he
              > also had fairly long steady track record with better avg results.
              Do the
              > research! Your mileage may vary!
              > Jimmy Kay 140 #135
              > PS I believe but can't prove I see slightly finer details on the
              planets.
              > The big limiting factor is lousy viewing, usually jet stream
              related on long
              > Island NY
            • rsampsonus
              ... No it isn t Evan, there are all kinds of other complications that can evolve from this surgery that are down played in the background.(infection and
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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                --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "echan1127" <echan1127@y...> wrote:
                > How about for deep sky? Pinpoint stars against a dark background -
                > does this cause any problems for people who have had lasik?
                >
                > Thank you all for the feedback. It seems like it isn't the slam-
                > dunk that I thought it'd be...
                >
                > -Evan





                No it isn't Evan, there are all kinds of other
                complications that can evolve from this surgery that are down played
                in the background.(infection and incorrect correction) I was employed
                by one of the medical instrumentation companies that built these
                units for the surgery and have seen countless cases that didn't pan
                out as expected.
                If you play percentages chances are things will work
                out fine, if like the other gentleman said you do your homework
                because your mileage may vary.
                My wife also worked for an Opthalmic Surgeon for 15
                years and she saw many cases where things didn't work out! It really
                is not a surgery suited for someone who is trying to eliminate
                glasses in there 30s. If you are going through this hassle you should
                try to maximize the glass free years!(~25-40--15 years glasses free)
                As part of your aging process by the time you are clipping your late
                thirties heading into your forties "the reading glasses syndrome" is
                setting in as part of your natural aging process. Your lens start to
                harden and you loose your accommodation, thus the need for reading
                glasses. In your late forties and on, your lens hardens further and
                starts to opacify(onset of cataracts) losing further accomodation.
                Personally I would really be careful making this
                choice it is elective surgery and things can go wrong. I feel my
                eyesight is far too valuable to chance it. The only one that I would
                chance is cataract removal when I get to that age bracket that my
                lens has opacified so bad I can see through it and my lens needs to
                be removed.


                Please think about it, just my $.02 Ron S






                >
                > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, Opticks5@A... wrote:
                > > Hi
                > > I had Lasik for both eyes. went from about 20/400 to 20/15.mild
                > to zero
                > > astigmatism. Every thing is better including planets except some
                > glare around
                > > brighter objects especially pinpoint objects stars and naked eye
                > planets.
                > > Overall it is a home run but for astronomy only a double or
                > triple. It eliminates
                > > most eyepiece ER problems and fogging the glasses in the winter
                > or finding
                > > the glasses to read star maps, record your observations. The
                > doctor noted that
                > > I have large 7.2mm pupils for my age 44 at that time and adapted
                > the
                > > procedure to compensate. But I still have some added glare
                > starting when my pupil
                > > goes from just under 5 mm and larger. The procedure has been
                > improved and is
                > > better. I went to a doctor who only does Lasik and should be
                > among the best. he
                > > also had fairly long steady track record with better avg
                results.
                > Do the
                > > research! Your mileage may vary!
                > > Jimmy Kay 140 #135
                > > PS I believe but can't prove I see slightly finer details on the
                > planets.
                > > The big limiting factor is lousy viewing, usually jet stream
                > related on long
                > > Island NY
              • Keith S
                Hey, Optic surgery is almost seen on the ads as cosmetic correction. It is to the point here in Dallas at least that some ads are promoting ripping out your
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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                  Hey,

                  Optic surgery is almost seen on the ads as cosmetic correction. It is
                  to the point here in Dallas at least that some ads are promoting
                  ripping out your old lens and replacing it with a man made one. I
                  understand that surgery was originally designed for severe cataract
                  problems but now a marketing person got it and renamed it to "Crystal
                  Lens".

                  Whats next? Sony Eye? If so I want the Super HAD version!

                  I may risk lasic in 15 years when I am 60+ but for now the glasses
                  work ok if only my dang arms were not so short.

                  Hey maybe I could get them extended! I get a lot of emails about
                  making parts longer!

                  As Mick and the boys said... "What a drag it is getting old"

                  Keith
                • Rich Wood
                  Keith; Dont knock getting old. The alternative is fatal and SO permanent : D ! Rich Wood 60 years young ... It is ... cataract ... to Crystal
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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                    Keith;

                    Dont knock getting old. The alternative is fatal and SO
                    permanent :>D !

                    Rich Wood
                    60 years young

                    --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "Keith S" <kasism@c...> wrote:
                    > Hey,
                    >
                    > Optic surgery is almost seen on the ads as cosmetic correction.
                    It is
                    > to the point here in Dallas at least that some ads are promoting
                    > ripping out your old lens and replacing it with a man made one. I
                    > understand that surgery was originally designed for severe
                    cataract
                    > problems but now a marketing person got it and renamed it
                    to "Crystal
                    > Lens".
                    >
                    > Whats next? Sony Eye? If so I want the Super HAD version!
                    >
                    > I may risk lasic in 15 years when I am 60+ but for now the glasses
                    > work ok if only my dang arms were not so short.
                    >
                    > Hey maybe I could get them extended! I get a lot of emails about
                    > making parts longer!
                    >
                    > As Mick and the boys said... "What a drag it is getting old"
                    >
                    > Keith
                  • Opticks5@AOL.com
                    In a message dated 6/1/2005 3:12:09 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, echan1127@yahoo.com writes: does this cause any problems for people who have had lasik? Thank
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 1, 2005
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                      In a message dated 6/1/2005 3:12:09 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, echan1127@... writes:

                      does this cause any problems for people who have had lasik?

                      Thank you all for the feedback.  It seems like it isn't the slam-
                      dunk that I thought it'd be...

                      -Evan

                      --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, Opticks5@A... wrote:
                      > Hi
                      >   I had Lasik for both eyes. went from about 20/400 to 20/15.mild
                      to  zero
                      > astigmatism. Every thing is better including planets except some
                      glare  around
                      > brighter objects especially pinpoint objects stars and naked eye
                      planets. 
                      > Overall it is a home run but for astronomy only a double or
                      triple. It  eliminates
                      > most eyepiece ER problems and fogging the glasses in the winter
                      or  finding
                      > the glasses to read star maps, record your observations. The
                      doctor  noted that
                      > I have large 7.2mm pupils for my age 44 at that time and adapted
                      the 
                      > procedure to compensate. But I still have some added glare
                      starting when my  pupil
                      > goes from just under 5 mm and larger. The procedure has  been
                      improved and is
                      > better. I went to a doctor who only does Lasik and  should be
                      among the best. he
                      > also had fairly long steady track record with  better avg results.
                      Do the
                      > research! Your mileage may vary!
                      >   Jimmy Kay 140 #135
                      > PS I believe but can't prove I see slightly finer details on the 
                      planets.
                      > The big limiting factor is lousy viewing, usually jet stream 
                      related on long
                      > Island NY

                      No glare on deep sky or dimmer stars
                    • prochoda
                      Evan: I am an ophthalmologist AND have been an amateur astronomer for over 35 years. I wear glasses and even though I could have Lasik done on myself for free
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                        Evan:
                        I am an ophthalmologist AND have been an amateur astronomer for over
                        35 years. I wear glasses and even though I could have Lasik done on
                        myself for free as a professional courtesy, I have never considered
                        it. The problem is my astronomy hobby.

                        For astronomical (large pupil diameter) situations, there is a high
                        probability of LOSS of contrast sensitivity, increased glare, and
                        ghost image problems postoperatively. This is due to the laser
                        ablation zone diameter, which is centered on the visual axis, but
                        never goes completely out to the outer edges of the cornea. Lasik
                        also changes the normal prolate surface of the cornea to a more
                        oblate surface, which can induce optical aberrations in large pupil
                        situations. Glasses or contacts still remain the best way to correct
                        vision when dealing with a large pupillary aperture. Many of my non-
                        astronomical friends are thrilled with their Lasik procedures and
                        don't notice much or only have minor problems with night vision.

                        For an astronomer (especially one who demands the highest performance
                        optics such as those made by TEC) Lasik is a real gamble with your
                        most precious asset as an observer. I have astronomy friends who
                        have been pleased with the results of Lasik surgery, but I know
                        others who wish they never would have had it done. Personally, I
                        strongly advise against the procedure in its current form for
                        observational astronomers.
                        - Mike (TEC 140 APO #169)


                        --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "echan1127" <echan1127@y...> wrote:
                        > Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this topic.

                        > Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more
                        planetary
                        > details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking them
                        off
                        > to observe. I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got contact
                        (toric)
                        > lenses. However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye to
                        the
                        > point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the directions)
                        for two
                        > days.
                        >
                        > Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes.
                        >
                        > The big question - will it affect planetary observing?
                        >
                        > -Evan
                      • tommack7882
                        ... on ... correct ... non- ... performance ... Thanks so much for your advise on this matter. You hear so much about the pros and cons of this procedure and
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                          --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "prochoda" <MProchoda@H...> wrote:
                          > Evan:
                          > I am an ophthalmologist AND have been an amateur astronomer for over
                          > 35 years. I wear glasses and even though I could have Lasik done
                          on
                          > myself for free as a professional courtesy, I have never considered
                          > it. The problem is my astronomy hobby.
                          >
                          > For astronomical (large pupil diameter) situations, there is a high
                          > probability of LOSS of contrast sensitivity, increased glare, and
                          > ghost image problems postoperatively. This is due to the laser
                          > ablation zone diameter, which is centered on the visual axis, but
                          > never goes completely out to the outer edges of the cornea. Lasik
                          > also changes the normal prolate surface of the cornea to a more
                          > oblate surface, which can induce optical aberrations in large pupil
                          > situations. Glasses or contacts still remain the best way to
                          correct
                          > vision when dealing with a large pupillary aperture. Many of my
                          non-
                          > astronomical friends are thrilled with their Lasik procedures and
                          > don't notice much or only have minor problems with night vision.
                          >
                          > For an astronomer (especially one who demands the highest
                          performance
                          > optics such as those made by TEC) Lasik is a real gamble with your
                          > most precious asset as an observer. I have astronomy friends who
                          > have been pleased with the results of Lasik surgery, but I know
                          > others who wish they never would have had it done. Personally, I
                          > strongly advise against the procedure in its current form for
                          > observational astronomers.
                          > - Mike (TEC 140 APO #169)
                          >
                          >Mike,
                          Thanks so much for your advise on this matter. You hear so much
                          about the pros and cons of this procedure and its very beneficial to
                          get a sanity check from an expert.

                          Cheers,
                          Tom Mack
                        • pandrolmb@aol.com
                          Well, I ve been following this thread closely as, after 47 years, my eyes are finally in need of correction. I was actually considering going straight from
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                            Well, I've been following this thread closely as, after 47 years, my eyes are finally in need of correction.  I was actually considering going straight from no glasses, to Lasik surgery, and the surgeon, BTW, made zero effort to dissuade me of the idea :-O!  But after reading Mike the opthalmologist's post, (THANK YOU!), it seems to me that the procedure is to be avoided for anyone who relies on "large pupil diameter" as is the case for this croud anyway.  I think I'll try contacts ;-).
                             
                            Mark  (TEC 200 ED APO #006 :-)
                             
                             
                          • echan1127
                            Thank you so much. To get it from you really means a lot. I guess I ll not be going the lasik route. It truly does not make sense to have the best optic in
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                              Thank you so much. To get it from you really means a lot. I guess I'll
                              not be going the lasik route. It truly does not make sense to have the
                              best optic in the world and to have my own eyes be the stumbling block.

                              Guess I'll be continuing with the contacts then...

                              --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "prochoda" <MProchoda@H...>
                              wrote:
                              > Evan:
                              > I am an ophthalmologist AND have been an amateur astronomer for
                              over
                              > 35 years. I wear glasses and even though I could have Lasik done on
                              > myself for free as a professional courtesy, I have never considered
                              > it. The problem is my astronomy hobby.
                              >
                              > For astronomical (large pupil diameter) situations, there is a high
                              > probability of LOSS of contrast sensitivity, increased glare, and
                              > ghost image problems postoperatively. This is due to the laser
                              > ablation zone diameter, which is centered on the visual axis, but
                              > never goes completely out to the outer edges of the cornea. Lasik
                              > also changes the normal prolate surface of the cornea to a more
                              > oblate surface, which can induce optical aberrations in large pupil
                              > situations. Glasses or contacts still remain the best way to correct
                              > vision when dealing with a large pupillary aperture. Many of my non-
                              > astronomical friends are thrilled with their Lasik procedures and
                              > don't notice much or only have minor problems with night vision.
                              >
                              > For an astronomer (especially one who demands the highest
                              performance
                              > optics such as those made by TEC) Lasik is a real gamble with your
                              > most precious asset as an observer. I have astronomy friends who
                              > have been pleased with the results of Lasik surgery, but I know
                              > others who wish they never would have had it done. Personally, I
                              > strongly advise against the procedure in its current form for
                              > observational astronomers.
                              > - Mike (TEC 140 APO #169)
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "echan1127"
                              <echan1127@y...> wrote:
                              > > Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this
                              topic.
                              >
                              > > Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more
                              > planetary
                              > > details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking
                              them
                              > off
                              > > to observe. I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got contact
                              > (toric)
                              > > lenses. However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye to
                              > the
                              > > point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the directions)
                              > for two
                              > > days.
                              > >
                              > > Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes.
                              > >
                              > > The big question - will it affect planetary observing?
                              > >
                              > > -Evan
                            • prochoda
                              Evan: Contact lenses may not be the best option for correcting astigmatism at the eyepiece. At high powers (as in the case for planetary and lunar
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jun 2, 2005
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                                Evan:
                                Contact lenses may not be the best option for correcting astigmatism
                                at the eyepiece. At high powers (as in the case for planetary and
                                lunar observations) the small exit pupil makes glasses or contact
                                lens wear unnecessary. In a recent discussion of astigmatism among
                                members of this group, I gave my opinion (see message #7376). I have
                                included a copy of that message as follows:

                                The problem with soft contact lenses which correct for astigmatism
                                (called toric soft contact lenses in optical lingo) is that they have
                                to be "weighted" in order to rotate to the correct astigmatic axis
                                orientation. With a face-down posture (like when looking through a
                                Newtonian near the horizon or through a diagonal on a refractor or
                                SCT), toric contacts tend to rotate away from the correct axis with
                                every eye blink. They also need a good tear film to work well.
                                This can make observing with them a blurry nuisance.

                                The best contact lens option for astigmatic correction is "hard" or
                                gas-permeable contact lenses. Unfortunately, these tend to be less
                                comfortable than soft lenses and are problematic for people with dry
                                eyes (most of us "oldies" have this problem).

                                My solution has been to wear my glasses (AR coated of course) and to
                                buy primarily long-eye-relief, wide-angle eyepieces. I especially
                                like the TeleVue Radian series for low and middle-power deep-sky
                                observing with glasses. I then remove my glasses to use short-focal-
                                length monocentrics, plossls, and orthos with shorter eye relief at
                                high powers to observe planets and the moon (where the small exit
                                pupil makes glasses wear unnecessary). You should need no more than
                                about 20 mm of eye relief with your glasses to see the field-stop.
                                If not, have your optician make you a specialty pair of AR-coated
                                glasses with small lenses, small wire or rimless frames, and no
                                bifocal correction, to use at the eyepiece only. These glasses
                                should allow you to get by with only about 15-20 mm of eye relief.
                                Hope this helps.
                                - Mike


                                --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "echan1127" <echan1127@y...> wrote:
                                > Thank you so much. To get it from you really means a lot. I guess
                                I'll
                                > not be going the lasik route. It truly does not make sense to have
                                the
                                > best optic in the world and to have my own eyes be the stumbling
                                block.
                                >
                                > Guess I'll be continuing with the contacts then...
                                >
                                > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "prochoda" <MProchoda@H...>
                                > wrote:
                                > > Evan:
                                > > I am an ophthalmologist AND have been an amateur astronomer for
                                > over
                                > > 35 years. I wear glasses and even though I could have Lasik done
                                on
                                > > myself for free as a professional courtesy, I have never
                                considered
                                > > it. The problem is my astronomy hobby.
                                > >
                                > > For astronomical (large pupil diameter) situations, there is a
                                high
                                > > probability of LOSS of contrast sensitivity, increased glare, and
                                > > ghost image problems postoperatively. This is due to the laser
                                > > ablation zone diameter, which is centered on the visual axis, but
                                > > never goes completely out to the outer edges of the cornea.
                                Lasik
                                > > also changes the normal prolate surface of the cornea to a more
                                > > oblate surface, which can induce optical aberrations in large
                                pupil
                                > > situations. Glasses or contacts still remain the best way to
                                correct
                                > > vision when dealing with a large pupillary aperture. Many of my
                                non-
                                > > astronomical friends are thrilled with their Lasik procedures and
                                > > don't notice much or only have minor problems with night vision.
                                > >
                                > > For an astronomer (especially one who demands the highest
                                > performance
                                > > optics such as those made by TEC) Lasik is a real gamble with
                                your
                                > > most precious asset as an observer. I have astronomy friends who
                                > > have been pleased with the results of Lasik surgery, but I know
                                > > others who wish they never would have had it done. Personally, I
                                > > strongly advise against the procedure in its current form for
                                > > observational astronomers.
                                > > - Mike (TEC 140 APO #169)
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "echan1127"
                                > <echan1127@y...> wrote:
                                > > > Hopefully someone in the group has some experience with this
                                > topic.
                                > >
                                > > > Recently I've noticed something while observing - I see more
                                > > planetary
                                > > > details when I observe WITH my glasses on as opposed to taking
                                > them
                                > > off
                                > > > to observe. I attributed it to my astigmatic eyes so got
                                contact
                                > > (toric)
                                > > > lenses. However, the contacts ended up bothering my right eye
                                to
                                > > the
                                > > > point where it was red and enflamed (yes I followed the
                                directions)
                                > > for two
                                > > > days.
                                > > >
                                > > > Now I'm looking to getting laser surgery for my eyes.
                                > > >
                                > > > The big question - will it affect planetary observing?
                                > > >
                                > > > -Evan
                              • Bahr, David
                                I d put in a positive note for the contacts. I have pretty bad astigmatism and toric lenses, but they work well most all the time. With a refractor and TEC
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jun 3, 2005
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                                  I'd put in a positive note for the contacts. I have pretty bad astigmatism and toric lenses, but they work well most all the time. With a refractor and TEC Mak, I'm not usually titling my head too far, so the weighted lens doesn't swim around. Occassionally (rarely) my eyes get a little wet, which causes annoying fogging at the eyepiece, but I find that far less annoying than smudging my glasses against an eyepiece (and taking the glasses on and off). No perfect solutions...

                                  just 2 cents...
                                  Dave
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