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Re: First Light Report - TEC-140 & Canon EOS20D

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  • andrea_lucchetti
    Hi Teri, did you use any kind of field flattner? Thanks, Andrea ... get out with ... would work ... EOS20D ... lanes ... good ... EOS20D ... collect the ...
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 1, 2004
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      Hi Teri,
      did you use any kind of field flattner?
      Thanks,
      Andrea

      --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "Teri Smoot" <montanacg@e...>
      wrote:
      > I agree with the need to stack more. However, I was anxious to
      get out with
      > the new "toys" and try several different things to see how they
      would work
      > together.
      >
      > Teri
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Paul K <paul@p...>
      > To: <tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 6:15 AM
      > Subject: [tec-scopes] Re: First Light Report - TEC-140 & Canon
      EOS20D
      >
      >
      > > Hi Teri,
      > >
      > > That's some really good shots, especially with 3/4 Moon!
      > >
      > > I really like your M31, that shows a lot of detail and the dust
      lanes
      > > really stand out.
      > >
      > > I'll need to read up on the EOS20D, as it seems to do a really
      good
      > > job on deep sky objects.
      > >
      > > I think once you start stacking more exposures (or longer ones),
      > > you'll get results that will rival some of the better CCD images.
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > >
      > > -Paul
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "Teri Smoot" <montanacg@e...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > All,
      > > >
      > > > Over the last couple of weeks, I received both a Canon
      EOS20D
      > > and a TEC-140 (#112). By last Thursday, I had managed to
      collect the
      > > necessary adapters/remotes to allow me to use all of this for the
      > > first time. It was a nice night from the point of view of
      observing
      > > (clear, temperatures around 15C, etc.) but the moon was probably
      > > about 3/4 full (with the attendant bright sky background) and
      that
      > > limited me with respect to the DSO's.
      > > >
      > > > When used visually, the views of the moon fomr the TEC were
      > > fantastic. Details were super sharp. The moon's brightness was
      such
      > > that it almost hurt to look (think I'll need some ND filters)
      but it
      > > almost seemed that I was walking along the rilles and between the
      > > craters. I also tried looking at some double stars. I could
      clearly
      > > split the double double (e Lyrae) at 122x (using my Televue 8-24
      zoom
      > > at 8mm). I also looked at some globulars (m13) and galaxies
      > > (M31/M33). The views here were probably impacted by the
      brightness
      > > of the sky. It would be really nice to try this scope
      (visually) at
      > > a dark sky site. I also can't wait (and didn't stay up) for
      views of
      > > the planets. The TEC will be a keeper.
      > > >
      > > > In the middle of viewing things, I set up the 20D for prime
      > > focus and did a fair amount of imaging (my first DSLR images and
      > > first Prime Focus images). I started with the moon and used
      same for
      > > focusing with the camera's viewfinder only. This worked quite
      well.
      > > One (very) nice feature of the TEC is that it has a micrometer
      on the
      > > focuser. Open loop focusing in the future (temperature
      calibrated??)
      > > uisng this micrometer to set the focus position may be sufficient
      > > till I get the (ordered) Angle Finder C or upgraded IP. I also
      did
      > > not realize that I left the "autorotate" sensor "on". This meant
      > > that my dark frames were (sometimes) rotated from my "light"
      frames
      > > (and, just rotating them back didn't work for some tbd reason).
      So,
      > > I didn't apply dark frames to any of the images (the camera had
      very
      > > little). I also was using the Canon RS-80N3 remote and counting
      down
      > > the exposure times. When I looked at the images, the exposure
      times
      > > were not as uniform as I would have liked. However, I just
      ignored
      > > this and stacked the images (using IP2.0) as though they were
      all the
      > > same exposure time. When I get my TC-80N3 (also backordered),
      I'll
      > > be able to improve on this as well.
      > > >
      > > > Now for the images, all taken with ISO 1600 (remember, I
      > > couldn't use darks, the moon was very bright, exposure times were
      > > uneven, and some objects -- especially M45 -- were pretty low on
      the
      > > horizon when I imaged them): (These also are all conversions
      from
      > > ~3504 x 2236pixels x 16bits RGB TIFF images to ~640x480 x 8bit
      RGB
      > > GIF's) [Hope I got all the tiny URL's right too.]
      > > >
      > > > a.. M13 at prime focus (a stack of three 1 minute images --
      all
      > > approximate exposure times): http://tinyurl.com/6828k. This
      turned
      > > out to be an excellent image far superior to any that I had
      gotten
      > > with my CP5700. Stars are distinct to the core of the cluster
      and,
      > > for a bonus, I even imaged a small dim galaxy (NGC6207) at the
      same
      > > time (if I were trying for the galaxy, I would have used a longer
      > > exposure). The GIF image, while still nice, doesn't do justice
      to
      > > the original.
      > > > b.. M31 (a stack of 5 -2 min images):
      > > http://tinyurl.com/5dnzh. This image also shows the companion
      > > galaxies M110 and M32. The dust lanes in M31 are also very
      clear.
      > > Note, this image does not have any background (or dark current)
      > > removed -- its just a digital development "stretch" of the stack
      of
      > > 5. I suspect that I'm also getting some falloff (a form of
      > > vignetting) at the edges of the image. a focal length of 980 mm
      is a
      > > bit too much for M31. A very nice image for only 10 minutes of
      > > exposure with little compensation.
      > > > c.. M33, the Pinwheel Galaxy (a stack of 7-2.5 min images):
      > > http://tinyurl.com/464zc. Again, lots of arm structure (and an
      > > emission nebula in M33--NGC604) is visible). I had tried this
      with
      > > the 5700 and had only gotten hints of arm structure. Here it is
      in
      > > its glory (and, I know it would be better with darks applied,
      taken
      > > in a dark sky, more images, etc.)
      > > > d.. M52, another open cluster (3-1 min images):
      > > http://tinyurl.com/4eqdj. Here again, nice round stars across
      the
      > > field of view. Again, a serendipitous capture of NGC7635, the
      Bubble
      > > nebula. I wasn't trying for this and, again, if I were trying to
      > > image just this, I would have used a longer exposure.
      > > > In all of these images, I know I haven't captured the
      depth of
      > > the capabilities of either the TEC or the 20D. And I know that
      there
      > > were some things I did wrong and can improve on. Still, I do
      think
      > > these start to show what these instruments are capable of.
      Enjoy.
      > > And, given that these are (for me): first light for telescope,
      first
      > > light for 20D, first DSLR shots, and first Prime Focus shots
      (four
      > > firsts for me in one night), I am very happy.
      > > >
      > > > Teri Smoot
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Teri Smoot
      Nope, no field flattener. Most of the images have had some cropping but the stars really stayed round to the edges of the field. Remember that the 20D s
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Nope, no field flattener. Most of the images have had some cropping but the
        stars really stayed round to the edges of the field. Remember that the
        20D's image sensor does not cover the whole field like a regular 35mm SLR
        would though (its 22.5mm x 15.0mm). That may have had an effect here.

        Teri

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: andrea_lucchetti <lucchetti_andrea@...>
        To: <tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 2:37 AM
        Subject: [tec-scopes] Re: First Light Report - TEC-140 & Canon EOS20D


        >
        > Hi Teri,
        > did you use any kind of field flattner?
        > Thanks,
        > Andrea
        >
        > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "Teri Smoot" <montanacg@e...>
        > wrote:
        > > I agree with the need to stack more. However, I was anxious to
        > get out with
        > > the new "toys" and try several different things to see how they
        > would work
        > > together.
        > >
        > > Teri
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Paul K <paul@p...>
        > > To: <tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 6:15 AM
        > > Subject: [tec-scopes] Re: First Light Report - TEC-140 & Canon
        > EOS20D
        > >
        > >
        > > > Hi Teri,
        > > >
        > > > That's some really good shots, especially with 3/4 Moon!
        > > >
        > > > I really like your M31, that shows a lot of detail and the dust
        > lanes
        > > > really stand out.
        > > >
        > > > I'll need to read up on the EOS20D, as it seems to do a really
        > good
        > > > job on deep sky objects.
        > > >
        > > > I think once you start stacking more exposures (or longer ones),
        > > > you'll get results that will rival some of the better CCD images.
        > > >
        > > > Regards,
        > > >
        > > > -Paul
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "Teri Smoot" <montanacg@e...>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > > All,
        > > > >
        > > > > Over the last couple of weeks, I received both a Canon
        > EOS20D
        > > > and a TEC-140 (#112). By last Thursday, I had managed to
        > collect the
        > > > necessary adapters/remotes to allow me to use all of this for the
        > > > first time. It was a nice night from the point of view of
        > observing
        > > > (clear, temperatures around 15C, etc.) but the moon was probably
        > > > about 3/4 full (with the attendant bright sky background) and
        > that
        > > > limited me with respect to the DSO's.
        > > > >
        > > > > When used visually, the views of the moon fomr the TEC were
        > > > fantastic. Details were super sharp. The moon's brightness was
        > such
        > > > that it almost hurt to look (think I'll need some ND filters)
        > but it
        > > > almost seemed that I was walking along the rilles and between the
        > > > craters. I also tried looking at some double stars. I could
        > clearly
        > > > split the double double (e Lyrae) at 122x (using my Televue 8-24
        > zoom
        > > > at 8mm). I also looked at some globulars (m13) and galaxies
        > > > (M31/M33). The views here were probably impacted by the
        > brightness
        > > > of the sky. It would be really nice to try this scope
        > (visually) at
        > > > a dark sky site. I also can't wait (and didn't stay up) for
        > views of
        > > > the planets. The TEC will be a keeper.
        > > > >
        > > > > In the middle of viewing things, I set up the 20D for prime
        > > > focus and did a fair amount of imaging (my first DSLR images and
        > > > first Prime Focus images). I started with the moon and used
        > same for
        > > > focusing with the camera's viewfinder only. This worked quite
        > well.
        > > > One (very) nice feature of the TEC is that it has a micrometer
        > on the
        > > > focuser. Open loop focusing in the future (temperature
        > calibrated??)
        > > > uisng this micrometer to set the focus position may be sufficient
        > > > till I get the (ordered) Angle Finder C or upgraded IP. I also
        > did
        > > > not realize that I left the "autorotate" sensor "on". This meant
        > > > that my dark frames were (sometimes) rotated from my "light"
        > frames
        > > > (and, just rotating them back didn't work for some tbd reason).
        > So,
        > > > I didn't apply dark frames to any of the images (the camera had
        > very
        > > > little). I also was using the Canon RS-80N3 remote and counting
        > down
        > > > the exposure times. When I looked at the images, the exposure
        > times
        > > > were not as uniform as I would have liked. However, I just
        > ignored
        > > > this and stacked the images (using IP2.0) as though they were
        > all the
        > > > same exposure time. When I get my TC-80N3 (also backordered),
        > I'll
        > > > be able to improve on this as well.
        > > > >
        > > > > Now for the images, all taken with ISO 1600 (remember, I
        > > > couldn't use darks, the moon was very bright, exposure times were
        > > > uneven, and some objects -- especially M45 -- were pretty low on
        > the
        > > > horizon when I imaged them): (These also are all conversions
        > from
        > > > ~3504 x 2236pixels x 16bits RGB TIFF images to ~640x480 x 8bit
        > RGB
        > > > GIF's) [Hope I got all the tiny URL's right too.]
        > > > >
        > > > > a.. M13 at prime focus (a stack of three 1 minute images --
        > all
        > > > approximate exposure times): http://tinyurl.com/6828k. This
        > turned
        > > > out to be an excellent image far superior to any that I had
        > gotten
        > > > with my CP5700. Stars are distinct to the core of the cluster
        > and,
        > > > for a bonus, I even imaged a small dim galaxy (NGC6207) at the
        > same
        > > > time (if I were trying for the galaxy, I would have used a longer
        > > > exposure). The GIF image, while still nice, doesn't do justice
        > to
        > > > the original.
        > > > > b.. M31 (a stack of 5 -2 min images):
        > > > http://tinyurl.com/5dnzh. This image also shows the companion
        > > > galaxies M110 and M32. The dust lanes in M31 are also very
        > clear.
        > > > Note, this image does not have any background (or dark current)
        > > > removed -- its just a digital development "stretch" of the stack
        > of
        > > > 5. I suspect that I'm also getting some falloff (a form of
        > > > vignetting) at the edges of the image. a focal length of 980 mm
        > is a
        > > > bit too much for M31. A very nice image for only 10 minutes of
        > > > exposure with little compensation.
        > > > > c.. M33, the Pinwheel Galaxy (a stack of 7-2.5 min images):
        > > > http://tinyurl.com/464zc. Again, lots of arm structure (and an
        > > > emission nebula in M33--NGC604) is visible). I had tried this
        > with
        > > > the 5700 and had only gotten hints of arm structure. Here it is
        > in
        > > > its glory (and, I know it would be better with darks applied,
        > taken
        > > > in a dark sky, more images, etc.)
        > > > > d.. M52, another open cluster (3-1 min images):
        > > > http://tinyurl.com/4eqdj. Here again, nice round stars across
        > the
        > > > field of view. Again, a serendipitous capture of NGC7635, the
        > Bubble
        > > > nebula. I wasn't trying for this and, again, if I were trying to
        > > > image just this, I would have used a longer exposure.
        > > > > In all of these images, I know I haven't captured the
        > depth of
        > > > the capabilities of either the TEC or the 20D. And I know that
        > there
        > > > were some things I did wrong and can improve on. Still, I do
        > think
        > > > these start to show what these instruments are capable of.
        > Enjoy.
        > > > And, given that these are (for me): first light for telescope,
        > first
        > > > light for 20D, first DSLR shots, and first Prime Focus shots
        > (four
        > > > firsts for me in one night), I am very happy.
        > > > >
        > > > > Teri Smoot
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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