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Re: [tec-scopes] TEC 160FL #43 First Light Report

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  • rmarcell@cox.net
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2011
      ---- DavidD <destrehandave@...> wrote:
      > My first worry was how well my CGEM-DX mounting (Hypertuned by Deep Space) would handle the 160. I can't believe how 'squatty' the tube is! I mean, I borrowed a 140 last month at the Deep South Regional Star Gaze, and the 160 is 'fat' in comparison!
      >
      > Now down to business. It was packed solidly. I got a call from Yuri on Monday, no message.. and it arrived on Tuesday evening. Imagine my surprise when I went out to get the paper on Wednesday morning to find a scope on my porch! Comment #1 - what kind of stuff does UPS smoke that they would leave a $13K package on your porch with no signature? Unreal.
      >
      > Now down to the fun part. The rings fit nicely into my CGEM-DX, but I had my wife and daughter 'spot' me as I dropped the scope into the rings. Put on the rings first, held the scope like a pile of wood, and had my wife close the rings. The rings are awesome... for now, I think they are the best thought out accessory there is.
      >
      > Now to assemble the finder. I hate to whine, but there is not a source on the internet that I could find that tells you which way the finder battery reticle goes. For the record, it's 'belly down'.
      >
      > After doing a standard alignment, the moon was completely set. While performing the alignment, I noticed an out-of-focus image of the mooon thru the scope (while aligning the awesome finder) which displayed two distinct small dark lines about 1:00 in the scope. I'm hoping it's just a hair ball or something, but the worst case scenario is that UPS mishandled the scope to a degree where I might have two small fractures in the optics. I'll know tomorrow.
      >
      > Now back to the review: I'm not an experienced lunar observer, but I enjoy seeing peaks of mountains illuminated in craters. There was a huge one lit in a large crater last night! It realy isn't fair to judge, because it was from within an Orion 10mm illuminated reticle eypeice which is not designed to give good images, but suffice it to say it was an awesome sight. I can't describe the differnce between that moon and the one I was accustomed to in my ED127... like two different objects.
      >
      > On to Jupiter... again, not a big planetary guy, but this is in my back yard with my neighbor's patio light on, and two streetlights in my driveway, so it was the obvious choice. The only other time I had seen the Galilean moons as disks was with my old C9.25, and there was absolutely no comparison in beauty. The 160 renders a gorgeous Jupiter! I called my friend Steve (a 140 owner) who was viewing through a C9.25 coincidentally from a much darker location, and there was nothing he could see that I couldn't. We talked about a festoon in one of the belts, and there was little doubt that I was enjoying the nicer view!
      >
      > Alas, it got pretty cold, so I turned to M37 using a 6mm Delos. Awesome.. from the suburbs! Switched to a 21mm Ethos, and I must say that it was the most beautiful object I've ever seen through a telescope. Perfectly pinpoint stars in a terrible suburban atmosphere! On to the Pleiades... I've owned a 4" Maksutov, a C9.25, an 80mm SkyWatcher ED refractor, a 5" Exlore Scientific ED, and have even borrowed a venerable TEC 140. All I'll say is wow! It's not like the views in the other scopes were bad, it's just that the 160 is _that_ much better.
      >
      > Just for kicks, I slewed quickly to the Andromeda galaxy, and the Orion Nebula... it was just too easy! Andromeda was _easily_ the brightest I've ever seen it to be (remember 3 street lights within 30 yards), and Orion was beautiful.
      >
      > In a word, what you read about the 160FL is understated. What you might not know is how much larger it is than the 140... I think it's about as large as I would want to be portable.
      >
      > More to come.. thanks for listening.
      >
    • rmarcell@cox.net
      David, Congratulations! I m excited for you. Thanks for the nice report and remember, I d like to get a look through it at some time. Ron Marcella (TEC 140 &
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 2011
        David,

        Congratulations! I'm excited for you. Thanks for the nice report and remember, I'd like to get a look through it at some time.

        Ron Marcella
        (TEC 140 & PAS)

        ---- DavidD <destrehandave@...> wrote:
        > My first worry was how well my CGEM-DX mounting (Hypertuned by Deep Space) would handle the 160. I can't believe how 'squatty' the tube is! I mean, I borrowed a 140 last month at the Deep South Regional Star Gaze, and the 160 is 'fat' in comparison!
        >
        > Now down to business. It was packed solidly. I got a call from Yuri on Monday, no message.. and it arrived on Tuesday evening. Imagine my surprise when I went out to get the paper on Wednesday morning to find a scope on my porch! Comment #1 - what kind of stuff does UPS smoke that they would leave a $13K package on your porch with no signature? Unreal.
        >
        > Now down to the fun part. The rings fit nicely into my CGEM-DX, but I had my wife and daughter 'spot' me as I dropped the scope into the rings. Put on the rings first, held the scope like a pile of wood, and had my wife close the rings. The rings are awesome... for now, I think they are the best thought out accessory there is.
        >
        > Now to assemble the finder. I hate to whine, but there is not a source on the internet that I could find that tells you which way the finder battery reticle goes. For the record, it's 'belly down'.
        >
        > After doing a standard alignment, the moon was completely set. While performing the alignment, I noticed an out-of-focus image of the mooon thru the scope (while aligning the awesome finder) which displayed two distinct small dark lines about 1:00 in the scope. I'm hoping it's just a hair ball or something, but the worst case scenario is that UPS mishandled the scope to a degree where I might have two small fractures in the optics. I'll know tomorrow.
        >
        > Now back to the review: I'm not an experienced lunar observer, but I enjoy seeing peaks of mountains illuminated in craters. There was a huge one lit in a large crater last night! It realy isn't fair to judge, because it was from within an Orion 10mm illuminated reticle eypeice which is not designed to give good images, but suffice it to say it was an awesome sight. I can't describe the differnce between that moon and the one I was accustomed to in my ED127... like two different objects.
        >
        > On to Jupiter... again, not a big planetary guy, but this is in my back yard with my neighbor's patio light on, and two streetlights in my driveway, so it was the obvious choice. The only other time I had seen the Galilean moons as disks was with my old C9.25, and there was absolutely no comparison in beauty. The 160 renders a gorgeous Jupiter! I called my friend Steve (a 140 owner) who was viewing through a C9.25 coincidentally from a much darker location, and there was nothing he could see that I couldn't. We talked about a festoon in one of the belts, and there was little doubt that I was enjoying the nicer view!
        >
        > Alas, it got pretty cold, so I turned to M37 using a 6mm Delos. Awesome.. from the suburbs! Switched to a 21mm Ethos, and I must say that it was the most beautiful object I've ever seen through a telescope. Perfectly pinpoint stars in a terrible suburban atmosphere! On to the Pleiades... I've owned a 4" Maksutov, a C9.25, an 80mm SkyWatcher ED refractor, a 5" Exlore Scientific ED, and have even borrowed a venerable TEC 140. All I'll say is wow! It's not like the views in the other scopes were bad, it's just that the 160 is _that_ much better.
        >
        > Just for kicks, I slewed quickly to the Andromeda galaxy, and the Orion Nebula... it was just too easy! Andromeda was _easily_ the brightest I've ever seen it to be (remember 3 street lights within 30 yards), and Orion was beautiful.
        >
        > In a word, what you read about the 160FL is understated. What you might not know is how much larger it is than the 140... I think it's about as large as I would want to be portable.
        >
        > More to come.. thanks for listening.
        >
      • gjwcac
        David, Congrats on the new baby. It s the kind of scope that once you use one, you understand what all the fuss was about. Jim M.
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 1, 2011
          David,

          Congrats on the new baby. It's the kind of scope that once you use one, you understand what all the fuss was about.

          Jim M.



          --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, "DavidD" <destrehandave@...> wrote:
          >

          > In a word, what you read about the 160FL is understated.
        • Wes Bolin
          Congratulations. You will continue to be impressed.  I have sn 11 and find it is at the heaviest that I want to set up and tear down. With the ScopeGuard
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 1, 2011
            Congratulations. You will continue to be impressed.  I have sn 11 and find it is at the heaviest that I want to set up and tear down. With the ScopeGuard case, it
            is not real light, but well protected.  If you decide on a case, get the top handle offset to balance with the OTA inside it, and also get wheels to roll it.  I didn't, and
            wish I did.
            Please update us as you use it more and more.  Have fun; its an excellent performer.
             
            Wes

            From: DavidD <destrehandave@...>
            To: tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 12:00 AM
            Subject: [tec-scopes] TEC 160FL #43 First Light Report

             
            My first worry was how well my CGEM-DX mounting (Hypertuned by Deep Space) would handle the 160. I can't believe how 'squatty' the tube is! I mean, I borrowed a 140 last month at the Deep South Regional Star Gaze, and the 160 is 'fat' in comparison!

            Now down to business. It was packed solidly. I got a call from Yuri on Monday, no message.. and it arrived on Tuesday evening. Imagine my surprise when I went out to get the paper on Wednesday morning to find a scope on my porch! Comment #1 - what kind of stuff does UPS smoke that they would leave a $13K package on your porch with no signature? Unreal.

            Now down to the fun part. The rings fit nicely into my CGEM-DX, but I had my wife and daughter 'spot' me as I dropped the scope into the rings. Put on the rings first, held the scope like a pile of wood, and had my wife close the rings. The rings are awesome... for now, I think they are the best thought out accessory there is.

            Now to assemble the finder. I hate to whine, but there is not a source on the internet that I could find that tells you which way the finder battery reticle goes. For the record, it's 'belly down'.

            After doing a standard alignment, the moon was completely set. While performing the alignment, I noticed an out-of-focus image of the mooon thru the scope (while aligning the awesome finder) which displayed two distinct small dark lines about 1:00 in the scope. I'm hoping it's just a hair ball or something, but the worst case scenario is that UPS mishandled the scope to a degree where I might have two small fractures in the optics. I'll know tomorrow.

            Now back to the review: I'm not an experienced lunar observer, but I enjoy seeing peaks of mountains illuminated in craters. There was a huge one lit in a large crater last night! It realy isn't fair to judge, because it was from within an Orion 10mm illuminated reticle eypeice which is not designed to give good images, but suffice it to say it was an awesome sight. I can't describe the differnce between that moon and the one I was accustomed to in my ED127... like two different objects.

            On to Jupiter... again, not a big planetary guy, but this is in my back yard with my neighbor's patio light on, and two streetlights in my driveway, so it was the obvious choice. The only other time I had seen the Galilean moons as disks was with my old C9.25, and there was absolutely no comparison in beauty. The 160 renders a gorgeous Jupiter! I called my friend Steve (a 140 owner) who was viewing through a C9.25 coincidentally from a much darker location, and there was nothing he could see that I couldn't. We talked about a festoon in one of the belts, and there was little doubt that I was enjoying the nicer view!

            Alas, it got pretty cold, so I turned to M37 using a 6mm Delos. Awesome.. from the suburbs! Switched to a 21mm Ethos, and I must say that it was the most beautiful object I've ever seen through a telescope. Perfectly pinpoint stars in a terrible suburban atmosphere! On to the Pleiades... I've owned a 4" Maksutov, a C9.25, an 80mm SkyWatcher ED refractor, a 5" Exlore Scientific ED, and have even borrowed a venerable TEC 140. All I'll say is wow! It's not like the views in the other scopes were bad, it's just that the 160 is _that_ much better.

            Just for kicks, I slewed quickly to the Andromeda galaxy, and the Orion Nebula... it was just too easy! Andromeda was _easily_ the brightest I've ever seen it to be (remember 3 street lights within 30 yards), and Orion was beautiful.

            In a word, what you read about the 160FL is understated. What you might not know is how much larger it is than the 140... I think it's about as large as I would want to be portable.

            More to come.. thanks for listening.



          • Jason
            A note on the case I designed and had custom made for my TEC160ED (longer and heavier at f/8): I designed it to have two top handles at about 1/3 and 2/3 the
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 1, 2011
              A note on the case I designed and had custom made for my TEC160ED
              (longer and heavier at f/8):

              I designed it to have two top handles at about 1/3 and 2/3 the length.
              One handle at maybe about 3/8 from the objective end would have balanced
              it fairly well if picking the case up with one hand, but I think as I
              get older (I'm now almost 50) this will become not only difficult but
              maybe is not a very good idea for me or the scope. Having two is nice
              for hoisting the very heavy scope + case into my SUV (with fairly high
              back end where I load it). It also keeps the case from twisting back and
              forth if it were lifted with one hand.

              I also have wheels on my case and consider them mandatory with such a
              heavy scope+case. My case is probably heavier than the ScopeGuard case -
              if I had to do it over I would have designed it using the lightest
              weight option that the company offered since it would have been a lot
              cheaper and also because for normal use the case just needs to keep the
              scope protected from scratches and light bumps, not falling off delivery
              trucks or hit by a car. I've never sent the scope anywhere by air and
              probably won't anytime soon. If I did, I'd double box it and include a
              lot of styrofoam pieces between the boxes. As it is now, whenever I use
              the scope I have to push and pull and lift a nearly indestructible and
              ultra-heavy-duty case for no good reason.

              One good thing about a heavy case is that if my car were to get hit from
              behind while taking the scope to an observing site it would be much less
              likely to be damaged, but this is unlikely since I don't transport it
              often.

              -Jason A.

              > -------- Original Message --------
              > Subject: Re: [tec-scopes] TEC 160FL #43 First Light Report
              > From: Wes Bolin <k5apl@...>
              > Date: Thu, December 01, 2011 10:36 am
              > To: "tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com" <tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com>
              >
              >
              > Congratulations. You will continue to be impressed.  I have sn 11 and find it is at the heaviest that I want to set up and tear down. With the ScopeGuard case, it
              > is not real light, but well protected.  If you decide on a case, get the top handle offset to balance with the OTA inside it, and also get wheels to roll it.  I didn't, and
              > wish I did.
              > Please update us as you use it more and more.  Have fun; its an excellent performer.
              >  
              > Wes
              >
              > From: DavidD <destrehandave@...>
              > To: tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 12:00 AM
              > Subject: [tec-scopes] TEC 160FL #43 First Light Report
              >
              >
              >  
              > My first worry was how well my CGEM-DX mounting (Hypertuned by Deep Space) would handle the 160. I can't believe how 'squatty' the tube is! I mean, I borrowed a 140 last month at the Deep South Regional Star Gaze, and the 160 is 'fat' in comparison!
              >
              > Now down to business. It was packed solidly. I got a call from Yuri on Monday, no message.. and it arrived on Tuesday evening. Imagine my surprise when I went out to get the paper on Wednesday morning to find a scope on my porch! Comment #1 - what kind of stuff does UPS smoke that they would leave a $13K package on your porch with no signature? Unreal.
              >
              > Now down to the fun part. The rings fit nicely into my CGEM-DX, but I had my wife and daughter 'spot' me as I dropped the scope into the rings. Put on the rings first, held the scope like a pile of wood, and had my wife close the rings. The rings are awesome... for now, I think they are the best thought out accessory there is.
              >
              > Now to assemble the finder. I hate to whine, but there is not a source on the internet that I could find that tells you which way the finder battery reticle goes. For the record, it's 'belly down'.
              >
              > After doing a standard alignment, the moon was completely set. While performing the alignment, I noticed an out-of-focus image of the mooon thru the scope (while aligning the awesome finder) which displayed two distinct small dark lines about 1:00 in the scope. I'm hoping it's just a hair ball or something, but the worst case scenario is that UPS mishandled the scope to a degree where I might have two small fractures in the optics. I'll know tomorrow.
              >
              > Now back to the review: I'm not an experienced lunar observer, but I enjoy seeing peaks of mountains illuminated in craters. There was a huge one lit in a large crater last night! It realy isn't fair to judge, because it was from within an Orion 10mm illuminated reticle eypeice which is not designed to give good images, but suffice it to say it was an awesome sight. I can't describe the differnce between that moon and the one I was accustomed to in my ED127... like two different objects.
              >
              > On to Jupiter... again, not a big planetary guy, but this is in my back yard with my neighbor's patio light on, and two streetlights in my driveway, so it was the obvious choice. The only other time I had seen the Galilean moons as disks was with my old C9.25, and there was absolutely no comparison in beauty. The 160 renders a gorgeous Jupiter! I called my friend Steve (a 140 owner) who was viewing through a C9.25 coincidentally from a much darker location, and there was nothing he could see that I couldn't. We talked about a festoon in one of the belts, and there was little doubt that I was enjoying the nicer view!
              >
              > Alas, it got pretty cold, so I turned to M37 using a 6mm Delos. Awesome.. from the suburbs! Switched to a 21mm Ethos, and I must say that it was the most beautiful object I've ever seen through a telescope. Perfectly pinpoint stars in a terrible suburban atmosphere! On to the Pleiades... I've owned a 4" Maksutov, a C9.25, an 80mm SkyWatcher ED refractor, a 5" Exlore Scientific ED, and have even borrowed a venerable TEC 140. All I'll say is wow! It's not like the views in the other scopes were bad, it's just that the 160 is _that_ much better.
              >
              > Just for kicks, I slewed quickly to the Andromeda galaxy, and the Orion Nebula... it was just too easy! Andromeda was _easily_ the brightest I've ever seen it to be (remember 3 street lights within 30 yards), and Orion was beautiful.
              >
              > In a word, what you read about the 160FL is understated. What you might not know is how much larger it is than the 140... I think it's about as large as I would want to be portable.
              >
              > More to come.. thanks for listening.
            • lmbuck2000
              dave -- i second the opinion to put two handles on the TOP. i carry it now with objective end handle and the top middle handle - a little bit uncomfortable
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 2, 2011
                dave -- i second the opinion to put two handles on the TOP. i carry it now with objective end handle and the top middle handle - a little bit uncomfortable and not well balanced. it would be much better with two top handles (evenly distributed across the top or 1/4 in from the objective end and about 1/3 in from the focuser end. DEFINITELY get the hard foam option. wheels probably would be nice but i prefer giving mine an 'air ride' :)

                enjoy it!!

                Lee

                --- In tec-scopes@yahoogroups.com, Wes Bolin <k5apl@...> wrote:
                >
                > Congratulations. You will continue to be impressed.  I have sn 11 and find it is at the heaviest that I want to set up and tear down. With the ScopeGuard case, it
                > is not real light, but well protected.  If you decide on a case, get the top handle offset to balance with the OTA inside it, and also get wheels to roll it.  I didn't, and
                > wish I did.
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