Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: TC articles display Greek & Hebrew

Expand Messages
  • James R. Adair
    On Thu, 8 Aug 1996, Stephen C Carlson wrote: (I wrote:) ... Right. The face attribute allows you to specify up to three fonts to try loading, but they must
    Message 1 of 1714 , Aug 8, 1996
    • 0 Attachment
      On Thu, 8 Aug 1996, Stephen C Carlson wrote:

      (I wrote:)
      > >The important thing to remember is that the
      > >character maps must match.
      >
      > Is the SPIonic font mapping unique, or did it borrow it from another
      > font? I'm thinking of the Silver Mountain Software fonts and other
      > packages. As far as I can understand the behavior of the HTML
      > <FONT FACE=> tag, one is allowed to specify multiple font faces to be
      > tried, e.g., <FONT FACE="SPIonic,Graeca">Mh=nin a)ei/de qea/</FONT>.
      > But even that trick will only work if the character maps are identical.

      Right. The face attribute allows you to specify up to three fonts to try
      loading, but they must have identical character maps to display
      properly. We had two primary goals in mind when we designed our fonts:
      ease of use by scholars in the field (that's why we based our fonts on the
      TLG and Michigan-Claremont standard encoding schemes) and compatibility
      between PC and Mac platforms. Our initial inclination was to take an
      existing, popular font and use the same character map, but there were two
      problems. First, as far as I can tell, there is no single Greek font,
      for example, that is used by a majority of people, and since the
      character maps vary among the various popular fonts, picking a standard
      would have been arbitrary. Second, and more importantly, we wanted to
      create fonts that would work on both PCs and Macs. Because of
      differences between the two platforms, that meant that we restricted
      ourselves to using the characters between 32 and 127 (i.e., ASCII).
      Since none of the fonts I knew about did this, we decided to create our own.

      > > If anyone runs across characters that don't
      > >display properly (particularly on the screen, but also in print) in
      > >either 10 or 12 point size, I would appreciate hearing about it. I have
      > >in mind characters that are unrecognizable or just plain wrong, but I'll
      > >be glad to at least consider improving particularly ugly letters.
      >
      > All I can remember offhand is that the dagesh in the beth is a bit off-
      > center, but that may be due to fit the narrower gimel.

      We do have more than one character for a single diacritical in our fonts
      (e.g., we have four different dageshes), but we don't have as many as most
      commercial fonts do, so positioning of breathing marks, accents, and vowel
      points may not be as nice in our fonts. Again, the reasons for this go
      back to our desire for ease of use and our self-imposed limitation on
      using only valid ASCII characters. What users should do is to try the
      diacritical characters in different combinations to see what looks best to
      them. I have tried to help by specifying that a breathing mark, for
      example, is designed for either narrow or wide characters. I plan to go
      back to the readme file and specify what I mean by narrow and wide, but
      for Greek, wide vowels are alpha and omega, and all the other vowels (and
      rho) are considered narrow.

      Jimmy Adair
      Manager of Information Technology Services, Scholars Press
      and
      Managing Editor of TELA, the Scholars Press World Wide Web Site
      ---------------> http://scholar.cc.emory.edu <-----------------
    • Julian Goldberg
      The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law, Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text with vowels and
      Message 1714 of 1714 , Feb 4 4:26 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law,
        Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text
        with vowels and cantillation marks in one complete compact black hard
        covered volume which measures 12 cm x 19 cm with over 1360 pages that
        have been arranged according to traditional chapter and verse divisions
        along with larger Hebrew letter printing and thicker paper pages for a
        volume of this size. Each book is $ 20.00 (U.S.) postpaid ($ 15.50 for
        the book plus $ 4.50 for postage) and can be ordered directly from:

        Julian Goldberg, 260 Adelaide St., E., # 215, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
        M5A 1N0.

        Thanks.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.