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Re: tc-list Cursive scripts in editions

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  • Prof. Ron Minton
    On Wed, 3 Mar 1999, Robert B. Waltz wrote:... ... It is interesting that the Hebrew Bible was printed a generation before the GNT. Ron Minton
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 3, 1999
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      On Wed, 3 Mar 1999, Robert B. Waltz wrote:...
      > It's said that the difficulties of typesetting Greek
      > script is one of the reasons why it took so long to
      > print a Greek NT. But the very difficulty might
      > have something to do with why it took so long to
      > evolve something easier: People weren't doing enough
      > Greek printing to think up alternatives.

      It is interesting that the Hebrew Bible was printed a generation
      before the GNT.

      Ron Minton
    • Robert B. Waltz
      ... I don t think it s surprising, really. Printing wasn t invented until after the fall of Byzantium (or, at least, so shortly before as makes no difference).
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 3, 1999
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        On 3/3/99, Prof. Ron Minton wrote:

        >It is interesting that the Hebrew Bible was printed a generation
        >before the GNT.

        I don't think it's surprising, really. Printing wasn't invented
        until after the fall of Byzantium (or, at least, so shortly
        before as makes no difference). So there was no particular
        reason for a Greek Bible to be printed; the Orthodox no longer
        had the Byzantine Empire, and the Catholics used the Latin
        Bible (which, of course, was the first book printed).

        Whereas the Jews, since they tried to get all their people to
        read the Hebrew scriptures, had an immediate use for a printed
        text. A Greek Bible was a luxury to Catholics (and an expensive
        one, given the problems of Greek printing :-), while a Hebrew
        printed text was very important to Jews anywhere.
        -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

        Robert B. Waltz
        waltzmn@...

        Want more loudmouthed opinions about textual criticism?
        Try my web page: http://www.skypoint.com/~waltzmn
        (A site inspired by the Encyclopedia of NT Textual Criticism)
      • Michael Holmes
        Re the use of cursive scripts and ligatures in early printed editions of the NT: Metzger (Text of the NT, pp. 96) writes, The attempt was made to reproduce in
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 4, 1999
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          Re the use of cursive scripts and ligatures in early printed editions of the NT:
          Metzger (Text of the NT, pp. 96) writes,
          "The attempt was made to reproduce in print the appearance of minuscule
          Greek handwriting, with its numerous alternative forms of the same letter,
          as well as its many combinations of two or more letters (ligatures).
          Instead, therefore, of producing type for merely the twenty-four letters of
          the Greek alphabet, printers prepared about 200 different characters.
          (Subsequently these variant forms of the same letters were abandoned, until
          today there remain only the two forms of the lower-case sigma"

          Mike Holmes


          At 12:32 PM 3/3/99 -0500, you wrote:
          >Hi,
          >
          >I have recently been making a study of the
          >early critical editions.
          >
          >It struck me as quite remarkable that editions
          >as late as Mill in 1707 still used a very cursive
          >script and ligatures.
          >
          >These must have been very difficult to typeset
          >and certainly much harder that using a regular
          >font - which the Complutasian appears to have.
          >
          >Apart from conservatism, does any one know why
          >they persisted in using this script?
          >
          >Regards
          >
          >Mike Bossingham
          >MikeBossingham@...
          >
          >
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