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Re: tc-list Greek O.T. "editiones quinta et sexta"

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  • Robert B. Waltz
    ... As I recall, Origen found one of those versions in a jar somewhere. Not what one would call the ordinary mode of circulation. :-) I have read that neither
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 1998
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      On Thu, 3 Sep 1998, "Glen Thompson" <thompsgl@...> wrote:

      >Dear TCers:
      >
      >I am needing to find information on what became known as the "editio
      >quinta" and the "editio sexta." Origen's Hexapla had 4 Greek
      >versions - LXX, Symmachus, Aquila and Theodotion. In addition, for
      >certain sections, including the Psalms, he had a fifth and sixth
      >(7th and 8th columns in his edition). I have discovered a little
      >about their origin, but am especially interested in their
      >circulation.
      >
      >Were editions of these versions available outside
      >Caesarea where ORigin's Hexapla lay. I have seen it said that the
      >Tetrapla (the 4 Greek versions mentioned above) circulated separately
      >from the Hexapla. Also, that the Hexapla as a whole never
      >circulated, i.e. that Jerome had to have copies of parts made as
      >needed or had to go to Caesarea to consult the whole.
      >
      >The point of my research is to try to nail down at what periods of
      >his life Jerome might have had access to the quinta and sexta, i.e.
      >only during his Bethlehem years, or perhaps during his stay at
      >Antioch, Constantinople and/or Rome.

      As I recall, Origen found one of those versions in a jar somewhere.
      Not what one would call the ordinary mode of circulation. :-)

      I have read that neither the hexapla nor the tetrapla actually
      circulated -- and I believe it. Too big, too expensive, too
      hard to copy accurately (since the former needed a scribe versed in
      both Greek and Hebrew, and even the latter, while the demands on
      the scribe were less, *still* required four times the parchment
      of an ordinary LXX).

      On the subject of the tetrapla, BTW, see H. M. Orlinsky,
      "Origen's Tetrapla--A Scholarly Fiction?" reprinted in
      Sidney Jellicoe, ed., _Studies in the Septuagint: Origins,
      Recensions, and Interpretations_ (Ktav, 1974).

      But the basic work you should consult is, of course, Field's
      edition of the Hexapla. It's a century and a quarter old,
      but I (based on my admittedly limited knowledge) know of
      no comprehensive replacement.

      Bob Waltz
      waltzmn@...

      "The one thing we learn from history --
      is that no one ever learns from history."
    • Mark Gipe
      I know this is not what you are asking about, but for photos of the Hexapla see Psalterii Hexapli Reliqviae by Iohannis Card. Mercati printed in 1958. I
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 1998
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        I know this is not what you are asking about, but for photos of the Hexapla see
        "Psalterii Hexapli Reliqviae" by Iohannis Card. Mercati printed in 1958. I
        have some copies of the book about 75 pages of so but not the whole thing. I
        know a library about 20 miles from where I live that has it.

        Also note other post for more data.

        Mark Gipe


        At 11:00 AM 9/3/98 -0600, you wrote:
        >Dear TCers:
        >
        >I am needing to find information on what became known as the "editio
        >quinta" and the "editio sexta." Origen's Hexapla had 4 Greek
        >versions - LXX, Symmachus, Aquila and Theodotion. In addition, for
        >certain sections, including the Psalms, he had a fifth and sixth
        >(7th and 8th columns in his edition). I have discovered a little
        >about their origin, but am especially interested in their
        >circulation.
        >
        >Were editions of these versions available outside
        >Caesarea where ORigin's Hexapla lay. I have seen it said that the
        >Tetrapla (the 4 Greek versions mentioned above) circulated separately
        >from the Hexapla. Also, that the Hexapla as a whole never
        >circulated, i.e. that Jerome had to have copies of parts made as
        >needed or had to go to Caesarea to consult the whole.
        >
        >The point of my research is to try to nail down at what periods of
        >his life Jerome might have had access to the quinta and sexta, i.e.
        >only during his Bethlehem years, or perhaps during his stay at
        >Antioch, Constantinople and/or Rome.
        >
        >Any help or thoughts or references where to look further would be
        >appreciated.
        >
        >Glen L. thompson
        >Martin Luther College
        >
        >
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