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tc-list Greek O.T. "editiones quinta et sexta"

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  • Glen Thompson
    Dear TCers: I am needing to find information on what became known as the editio quinta and the editio sexta. Origen s Hexapla had 4 Greek versions - LXX,
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 1998
      Dear TCers:

      I am needing to find information on what became known as the "editio
      quinta" and the "editio sexta." Origen's Hexapla had 4 Greek
      versions - LXX, Symmachus, Aquila and Theodotion. In addition, for
      certain sections, including the Psalms, he had a fifth and sixth
      (7th and 8th columns in his edition). I have discovered a little
      about their origin, but am especially interested in their
      circulation.

      Were editions of these versions available outside
      Caesarea where ORigin's Hexapla lay. I have seen it said that the
      Tetrapla (the 4 Greek versions mentioned above) circulated separately
      from the Hexapla. Also, that the Hexapla as a whole never
      circulated, i.e. that Jerome had to have copies of parts made as
      needed or had to go to Caesarea to consult the whole.

      The point of my research is to try to nail down at what periods of
      his life Jerome might have had access to the quinta and sexta, i.e.
      only during his Bethlehem years, or perhaps during his stay at
      Antioch, Constantinople and/or Rome.

      Any help or thoughts or references where to look further would be
      appreciated.

      Glen L. thompson
      Martin Luther College
    • Robert B. Waltz
      ... As I recall, Origen found one of those versions in a jar somewhere. Not what one would call the ordinary mode of circulation. :-) I have read that neither
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 1998
        On Thu, 3 Sep 1998, "Glen Thompson" <thompsgl@...> wrote:

        >Dear TCers:
        >
        >I am needing to find information on what became known as the "editio
        >quinta" and the "editio sexta." Origen's Hexapla had 4 Greek
        >versions - LXX, Symmachus, Aquila and Theodotion. In addition, for
        >certain sections, including the Psalms, he had a fifth and sixth
        >(7th and 8th columns in his edition). I have discovered a little
        >about their origin, but am especially interested in their
        >circulation.
        >
        >Were editions of these versions available outside
        >Caesarea where ORigin's Hexapla lay. I have seen it said that the
        >Tetrapla (the 4 Greek versions mentioned above) circulated separately
        >from the Hexapla. Also, that the Hexapla as a whole never
        >circulated, i.e. that Jerome had to have copies of parts made as
        >needed or had to go to Caesarea to consult the whole.
        >
        >The point of my research is to try to nail down at what periods of
        >his life Jerome might have had access to the quinta and sexta, i.e.
        >only during his Bethlehem years, or perhaps during his stay at
        >Antioch, Constantinople and/or Rome.

        As I recall, Origen found one of those versions in a jar somewhere.
        Not what one would call the ordinary mode of circulation. :-)

        I have read that neither the hexapla nor the tetrapla actually
        circulated -- and I believe it. Too big, too expensive, too
        hard to copy accurately (since the former needed a scribe versed in
        both Greek and Hebrew, and even the latter, while the demands on
        the scribe were less, *still* required four times the parchment
        of an ordinary LXX).

        On the subject of the tetrapla, BTW, see H. M. Orlinsky,
        "Origen's Tetrapla--A Scholarly Fiction?" reprinted in
        Sidney Jellicoe, ed., _Studies in the Septuagint: Origins,
        Recensions, and Interpretations_ (Ktav, 1974).

        But the basic work you should consult is, of course, Field's
        edition of the Hexapla. It's a century and a quarter old,
        but I (based on my admittedly limited knowledge) know of
        no comprehensive replacement.

        Bob Waltz
        waltzmn@...

        "The one thing we learn from history --
        is that no one ever learns from history."
      • Mark Gipe
        I know this is not what you are asking about, but for photos of the Hexapla see Psalterii Hexapli Reliqviae by Iohannis Card. Mercati printed in 1958. I
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 3, 1998
          I know this is not what you are asking about, but for photos of the Hexapla see
          "Psalterii Hexapli Reliqviae" by Iohannis Card. Mercati printed in 1958. I
          have some copies of the book about 75 pages of so but not the whole thing. I
          know a library about 20 miles from where I live that has it.

          Also note other post for more data.

          Mark Gipe


          At 11:00 AM 9/3/98 -0600, you wrote:
          >Dear TCers:
          >
          >I am needing to find information on what became known as the "editio
          >quinta" and the "editio sexta." Origen's Hexapla had 4 Greek
          >versions - LXX, Symmachus, Aquila and Theodotion. In addition, for
          >certain sections, including the Psalms, he had a fifth and sixth
          >(7th and 8th columns in his edition). I have discovered a little
          >about their origin, but am especially interested in their
          >circulation.
          >
          >Were editions of these versions available outside
          >Caesarea where ORigin's Hexapla lay. I have seen it said that the
          >Tetrapla (the 4 Greek versions mentioned above) circulated separately
          >from the Hexapla. Also, that the Hexapla as a whole never
          >circulated, i.e. that Jerome had to have copies of parts made as
          >needed or had to go to Caesarea to consult the whole.
          >
          >The point of my research is to try to nail down at what periods of
          >his life Jerome might have had access to the quinta and sexta, i.e.
          >only during his Bethlehem years, or perhaps during his stay at
          >Antioch, Constantinople and/or Rome.
          >
          >Any help or thoughts or references where to look further would be
          >appreciated.
          >
          >Glen L. thompson
          >Martin Luther College
          >
          >
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