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tc-list Re: Leningradensis

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  • Harold P. Scanlin
    The names given to manuscripts often derive from historical circumstances. For example the NT ms Codex Bezae retains that name even though Theodore Bezae died
    Message 1 of 1 , May 11, 1998
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      The names given to manuscripts often derive from historical circumstances.
      For example the NT ms Codex Bezae retains that name even though Theodore
      Bezae died centuries ago. Likewise, Codex Leningradensis (Evr. II.B.19a)
      became the standard name for that manuscript ever since the appearance of
      BHK, based on that manuscript. To maintain a degree of continuity with the
      standard name and abbreviation, Leningradensis has been retained; St.
      Petersburg is used, of course, when identifying the library in which it is
      housed.

      Petropolitanus is a different manuscript, housed in the same library and
      numbered Firk. I B 3. This name was used ever since Strack published an
      edition of it in 1876. On the other hand B19a was described, if at all, in
      the pre-1917 literature in a variety of ways. Ginsburg, for example,
      called it "the St. Petersburg Codex dated A. D. 1009," to distinguish it
      from what most textual scholars considered at the time to be a more
      important manuscript, "the St. Petersburg Codex dated A. D. 916," or just
      "the St. Petersburg manuscript," i. e. Codex Petropolitanus.

      Harold P. Scanlin
      United Bible Societies
      1865 Broadway
      New York, NY 10023
      scanlin@...
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