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tc-list In need of more lectionary help

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  • Mark and Wendy Proctor
    A few days ago I sent a message out requesting some help on Lectionary 866. Thanks to everyone who responded. I now have a few more questions: (1) Lectionary
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 1998
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      A few days ago I sent a message out requesting some help on Lectionary 866.  Thanks to everyone who responded.  I now have a few more questions:
       
      (1) Lectionary 866 begins with the Gospel of John, and the various readings are fairly easy to pick out.  Am I correct in assuming that the readings in the lectionary are arranged day-by-day?  Do the readings for one week begin with Sunday and proceed through the course of the next seven days to Saturday, or are the Saturday-Sunday lections fall into a separate category than the weekday lections?  Put simply, I'm wondering if I'll be able to locate my texts (Mark 1:40-45; Matt 8:1-4; Luke 5:12-16) by counting days in the lectionary (since Lectionary 866 is complete and since I now know the days these three passages are read on).
      (2) How many weeks are there between Easter and Pentecost?  This should help me locate the ending of John with ease.
      (3) How many weeks are there between Holy Cross Day and the start of Lent?
       
      In case you are curious why I need to know these questions, I'll give you my proposed strategy for locating the passages I listed above.
      Mark 1:35-44 is read on Saturday of the second week in Great Lent.
      Luke 5:12-16 is read on Tues of the second week of Lukan lections.
      Matt 7:24-29; 8:1-4 is read on Sat of the third week of Matthean lections.
      With this data and the info from the Aland's intro text in mind (pp 176 ff), I came up with the following strategy for locating the passages I need in the text of Lectionary 866.  I assume that the the readings are organized within the lectionary from Sun through Sat.
      (1)  Find the end of John.  John is read in the period from Easter to Pentecost, and that is why I need to know the length of this period.
      (2)  Matt 8:1-4 should be on Sat of the third week after the end of John.
      (3) Count 13 more weeks (273 days) to reach Holy Cross day.
      (4)  Lk 5:12-16 is read on Tues of the second week after Holy Cross day, therefore count 10 days after Holy Cross day
      (5)  Count "x" weeks ("y" days) from Holy Cross day to reach the beginning of Lent.  As my third question indicates, I need more data to be precise in this regard.
      (6)  Count to Sat of the second week in Great Lent to locate Mark 1:35-44.
       
      I must be oversimplifying my task (or perhaps I'm making it more difficult than necessary), but I'll only know if you help me.  Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.
       
      Sincerely,
       
      Mark Proctor
    • JEAN VALENTIN
      Maybe the best way to get acquainted with the lectionary system is to take the time to make your own table of contents of the lectionary you are using. If you
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 3, 1998
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        Maybe the best way to get acquainted with the lectionary system is to take
        the time to make your own table of contents of the lectionary you are
        using. If you have an evening you want to use for this, it will be
        rewarding.

        Here's what I did with one of my Arabic lectionaries: for each reading,
        note the first one or two sentences, and the last ones (incipit and
        explicit). With this, you will easily be able to find the biblical
        references. Besides this, note the folio (the page in your manuscript). Do
        this for all readings. If it's important for you, note also the rubrics,
        that give you the time of the year when the text is read. You can also give
        a number to each reading, beginning with reading number one. So you will
        have a table of the readings in the order of the manuscript.

        Be careful, in the Holy Week there are harmonized readings which you will
        have to read entirely in order to find all the references. The rest of the
        year, there are also some, but they are shorter and can be easily found
        with the incipit and explicit (For example, I've noticed that my reading 56
        has a few verses from Mt 10, then a few from Mt 19, and that my reading 96
        has a few verses from Lk 8 followed by a few others from Lk 20).

        When you're finished with this, put everything in the order of the biblical
        references. You will have tables that allow you to quickly find the reading
        you are searching (and that, later, when you are confronted with other
        lectionaries, will be useful for comparisons).

        You will also notice that the lectionary generally begins with John, then
        follows with the other Gospels, but inside each Gospel it doesn't always
        follow the exact ("biblical") order. A text that is before another text in
        the biblical order can be read after it in the lectionary.

        Two examples (from an Arabic lectionary influenced by the Jerusalem rite,
        so don't take it for granted that you will meet exactly the same in your
        Greek lectionary!):
        (1) Reading 6 is Jn 3.22-33. Reading 7 is Jn 20.19-31. Then with reading 8,
        we come back to John 2.1-11 and with reading 9, to Jn 3.16-21.
        (2) Reading 34 is Jn 10.28-38, then reading 35 is Jn 9.1-38.

        Reading 4 is a reading from Lk, in the middle of a whole series from Jn.
        Etc, etc...

        All of this is due to the necessities of having a reading appropriate for
        the time of the year.

        Of course, you need to take some time to do this. It might seem a bit
        boring to do this job, but it probably is the best way to get a first-hand
        acquaintance with the system, which is the same in all the lectionaries of
        the Byzantine rite (nearly all Greek lectionaries follow it, and a good
        number in other languages). When you have this, you will be able to easily
        find a reference in your lectionary if you have noted the page where each
        reading occurs. And when you get used to it, you can also use it with the
        other lectionaries (except that the page numbers will change of course, but
        not the relative position of the readings).

        This is what I did as I had no introduction to the Byzantine lectionary
        available. For the Jerusalem rite, we have several good works on the
        subject, including the invaluable work of Tarchnishvili on the Georgian
        lectionary. The edition of the Syropalestinian lectionary can be of good
        help, as two manuscripts are closer to the Byzantine system, while the
        third one shows influences from the Jerusalem rite.

        I'm also a beginner in the use of the lectionaries, so if you or somebody
        else on the list has other informations (especially bibligraphical), I'll
        be glad to use them!

        A suggestion for the TC web site: wouldn't it be nice to have there a
        little intro to the lectionary system(s), with a table of the readings, as
        this information seems difficult to find in the current introductions to
        the discipline?

        Greetings,

        Jean V.

        ____________________________________________________________________________
        Jean Valentin - Bruxelles - Belgique

        jgvalentin@... / jean.valentin@...
      • HPS.Bakker@nias.knaw.nl
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 5, 1998
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          >A few days ago I sent a message out requesting some help on Lectionary
          >866. Thanks to everyone who responded. I now have a few more questions:

          First of all it is important to remember that a lectionary usually consists
          of a Synaxarion and a Menologion (please note that these terms are not
          always used consistently by Byzantine bookman in liturgical books).

          The Synaxarion gives the lections for the days dependent on the Easter
          cycle, consisting of the following parts: (1) the period between Easter and
          Pentecost: Johannean lections; (2) the period after pentecost, subdivided
          in (2a) the Matthean readings (until the Exaltation of the Cross) and (2b)
          the Lukan readings; (3) the period of Great Lent (mostly Mark), the start
          of which depends on the following Easter date; (4) Holy Week (pericopes and
          compilations from all four Gospels).

          The Menologion gives the lections for the 'fixed' days of the Byzantine
          calendar, which starts with the month September. Nowadays the Feast of the
          Exaltation of the Cross (14 Sept) governs the start of period 2b of the
          Synaxarion. However, I have the impression this is later adaptation of the
          Byzantine 'Typikon': in most MSS I have examined the counting of the
          'Lukan' weeks does not start anew. As a result, Tuesday of the second week
          of the Lukan period, may be counted as Tuesday of the 19th week after
          Easter (in the rubric something like 'G ths ITh').


          >(1) Lectionary 866 begins with the Gospel of John, and the various
          >readings are fairly easy to pick out. Am I correct in assuming that the
          >readings in the lectionary are arranged day-by-day? Do the readings for
          >one week begin with Sunday and proceed through the course of the next
          >seven days to Saturday, or are the Saturday-Sunday lections fall into a
          >separate category than the weekday lections? Put simply, I'm wondering if
          >I'll be able to locate my texts (Mark 1:40-45; Matt 8:1-4; Luke 5:12-16)
          >by counting days in the lectionary (since Lectionary 866 is complete and
          >since I now know the days these three passages are read on).

          Yes, the Gospel lectionary starts with John 1:1 (as does the Diatessaron).
          Although officiallly Sunday is of course the first day of the week, it is
          important to note that after Pentecost first the lections of Monday (=
          Deutera = second day) thru Saturday of, for instance, week 3 are given;
          they are then followed by the third Sunday lection. This can be confusing:
          carefully read the rubrics.

          I do not have access here to the new Kurzgefasste Liste (in the old one I
          discovered a number of mistakes), because it is important to know what type
          of lectionary you are dealing with. The major division is between 'long'
          and 'short' lectionaries (see p. 81* of NA27, where the first group is
          indicated with 'le' the second with 'lesk' and 'lsk'). Usually in short
          lectionaries weekday lections are only provided for period 1. That means
          that if your lectionary is of type 'lesk' or 'lsk', you will not find the
          Lukan lection you are after.

          If one looks at the selection of pericopes, one has the impression that the
          historical development of the lectionary may have been as follows: first
          the Sunday cycle, then the Saturday lections were added and only later were
          lections for the weekdays appointed. This means that the textual character
          of the weekday lections may be different, because they could have been
          taken from continuous-text MSS at a later stage (something similar holds
          for lections for more recent feasts in the Menologion).

          A lectionary is a living organism. Before using one as a textual witness,
          one should get acquainted with its own structure and historical
          development.


          >(2) How many weeks are there between Easter and Pentecost? This should
          >help me locate the ending of John with ease.

          That's a tough one: 7.


          >(3) How many weeks are there between Holy Cross Day and the start of Lent?

          Here the two cycles interact, so the number differs from year to year.


          Kalh epituchia!

          Michael Bakker


          Dr H.P.S. Bakker

          Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS)
          Meijboomlaan 1
          2242 PR Wassenaar
          The Netherlands
          tel.: +31 70 512 2700
          fax: +31 70 511 7162

          Slavic Seminar
          University of Amsterdam
          Spuistraat 210
          1012 VT Amsterdam
        • James R. Adair
          ... Jean, If you (or someone else) are willing to put together a short intro of this nature, I ll be glad to add it to the TC Links page. Jimmy Adair General
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 6, 1998
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            On Wed, 4 Mar 1998, JEAN VALENTIN wrote:

            > A suggestion for the TC web site: wouldn't it be nice to have there a
            > little intro to the lectionary system(s), with a table of the readings, as
            > this information seems difficult to find in the current introductions to
            > the discipline?

            Jean,

            If you (or someone else) are willing to put together a short intro of this
            nature, I'll be glad to add it to the TC Links page.

            Jimmy Adair
            General Editor of TC: A Journal of Biblical Textual Criticism
            -------------------> http://purl.org/TC <--------------------
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