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tc-list Latin Vulgate Bible

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  • Vincent Broman
    ... There is an electronic transcription of the Vulgate Bible available on the Internet in lots of places, such as the OBI, with no provenance mentioned. I ve
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 26, 1997
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      There is an electronic transcription of the Vulgate Bible available on the
      Internet in lots of places, such as the OBI, with no provenance mentioned.
      I've compared the text at the beginning of Mark against the apparatus
      of the Nestle-Aland Nova Vulgata and concluded that it seems
      to be the Stuttgart 1975 Vulgate. The accuracy seems to be pretty good,
      i.e. it wasn't a quick scanning hatchet job. The differences from the
      Nova Vulgata with apparatus seemed to be orthographical, stuff that is
      not expected to be reflected in its apparatus anyway.
      Has anyone seen any Latin bibles in electronic form not derived from this
      transcription?

      A question about Latin Vulgate orthography....
      In the 4th/5th century of Jerome, did Latin distinguish U/V and I/J already?
      I know that they are classically the same, and that later in the
      middle ages V and B are confused, indicating V had become a consonant.
      But when did these changes occur?


      Vincent Broman San Diego, California, USA
      Email: broman at sd.znet.com (home) or spawar.navy.mil or nosc.mil (work)
      Phone: +1 619 284 3775 Starship: 32d42m22s N 117d14m13s W
      === PGP protected mail preferred. For public key finger me at np.nosc.mil ===

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    • Stephen C. Carlson
      ... Orthography and pronunciation are two separate issues, and I will address the latter first. A good source for classical Latin pronunication is W. Sidney
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 26, 1997
        At 07:04 11/26/97 -0000, Vincent Broman wrote:
        >A question about Latin Vulgate orthography....
        >In the 4th/5th century of Jerome, did Latin distinguish U/V and I/J already?
        >I know that they are classically the same, and that later in the
        >middle ages V and B are confused, indicating V had become a consonant.
        >But when did these changes occur?

        Orthography and pronunciation are two separate issues, and I will address
        the latter first. A good source for classical Latin pronunication is W.
        Sidney Allen, VOX LATINA (Cambridge: U.P., 1965) (2d ed. 1978). On page
        41, Allen explains that the evidence in the 1st cen. B.C. clearly shows
        that Latin 'v' was pronounced as a [w]. However, starting the 1st cen.
        A.D., 'v' and 'b' were sporadically confused in inscriptions, and by the
        2d cen. A.D. Velius Longus clearly referred to friction in the sound,
        indicating a [v] or more probably a [B] sound ([B] as in Spanish 'lavar'
        [laBar]). The [w] sound for 'v' appears to have lasted in a few isolated
        quarters until the 5th cen. A.D.

        As for I/J, Allen, p.38, only says that the change from the semi-vowel "y"
        sound to an affricative "j" sound is "very late" and indeed has not yet
        occurred in all places, e.g. Spanish "yace" from Latin "iacet." I can only
        infer from this statement that Jerome probably said a "y" sound.

        According to Allen, the orthographic distinction between the consonants j, v
        and vowels i, u is relatively recent, i.e. no earlier than the 15th cen.,
        since the medievel usage was for j, v to be used in word-initial position
        and i, u in other places. The vowel/consonant orthographic distinction can
        be traced to a suggestion by Leonbattista Alberti in 1465 and adopted into
        Spanish in 1492 and Latin in 1559, followed shortly by the French. I am
        personally aware that 'j' in Italian is used variously for foreign words,
        certain dialectal words (e.g. Romanesque "ajo" ['y' sound] = Std.It. "aglio"
        garlic), and as a old-style abbreviation for a final '-ii'.

        In summary, for the Vulgate, I/J and U/V were not orthographically
        distinct, yet consonantal I/J was probably pronounced as a "y" and
        consonantal U/V as a (Spanish) "v".

        Stephen Carlson
        --
        Stephen C. Carlson : Poetry speaks of aspirations,
        scarlson@... : and songs chant the words.
        http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/ : -- Shujing 2.35
      • Vincent Broman
        ... Thanks, Stephen Carlson, for the fine summary. I could partially answer my own question this weekend when I found sample plates from Brixianus and
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 1, 1997
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          Thanks, Stephen Carlson, for the fine summary.
          I could partially answer my own question this weekend when
          I found sample plates from Brixianus and Fuldensis and I could
          not see any difference between I and J nor between U and V.

          Vincent Broman

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