Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Supercessionism]

Expand Messages
  • Timster132@aol.com
    In a message dated 95-12-01 19:18:25 EST, j.mallon@utoronto.ca (James Mallon) ... I for one would like to encourage Jewish/Tanakh scholars to use this list,
    Message 1 of 1714 , Dec 1, 1995
    • 0 Attachment
      In a message dated 95-12-01 19:18:25 EST, j.mallon@... (James Mallon)
      writes:

      >Nevertheless, with all due respect, is it not Christian belief that Christ
      >has ushered in the New Covenant which fulfills the first (or "Old"
      >covenant)--he kaine diatheke?
      > Is there not something so radically new in Christ? Do Christians not
      >believe that there is (Heb 1:1-2)? Why be misleading about this belief?

      I for one would like to encourage Jewish/Tanakh scholars to use this list,
      since I really would like to learn more about TC of the Hebrew Scriptures.
      It seems to be radically different from NT text studies, and I feel I could
      learn a lot.
      In seminary, when I was exposed to Jewish-Christian relations, I
      discovered that using terms that are acceptable to both faiths helps to open
      the door to such an opportunity of learning.

      It's not such a matter of "giving up" our beliefs, but having a more common
      point of reference.

      Besides, we who are text critics know that there is some question as to if
      Jesus did say KAINHS when referring to the DIAQHKHS he was making (Mk14:24;
      Mt 26:28). the text of Paul clearly states KAINHS (1 Cor 11:25), and Luke
      probably did (if you accept 22:19b-20, which I do).

      The idea of a "new" convenant comes from Jeremiah, which is really a
      renewal of the Mosaic covenant. I think the early Jewish Christians who
      wrote the Scriptures could clearly have understood Jesus' covenant with them
      in this sense, and that this covenant was expanded "for the many" (ie, we
      Gentiles).
      Indeed, the ancient Abrahamic covenant (which the Mosaic covenant is based
      upon), intends the nations to be blessed.
      It's the same story of God's grace toward us. As Gentile Christians,
      we've seen it fully made known to us in the Jew called Jesus of Nazereth.

      There's no doubt there is anitsemitism and supercessionism in the NT. But
      the message of God's love for all is central.

      After the Holocaust, and after years of Christians using NT passages as a
      pretense for persecuting Jewish folk, meeting them half-way in using common
      terms can help some in easing the fear and tension between us.

      So on this TC-list, I would like to us to consider using inter-faith
      terminology, NOT to be more PC, but so we can make this list a friendly place
      for scholars of different faiths who have a lot to contribute to Biblical
      text criticism.

      Please consider this. Thanks.

      Tim Staker
      Timster132@...
    • Julian Goldberg
      The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law, Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text with vowels and
      Message 1714 of 1714 , Feb 4, 1997
      • 0 Attachment
        The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law,
        Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text
        with vowels and cantillation marks in one complete compact black hard
        covered volume which measures 12 cm x 19 cm with over 1360 pages that
        have been arranged according to traditional chapter and verse divisions
        along with larger Hebrew letter printing and thicker paper pages for a
        volume of this size. Each book is $ 20.00 (U.S.) postpaid ($ 15.50 for
        the book plus $ 4.50 for postage) and can be ordered directly from:

        Julian Goldberg, 260 Adelaide St., E., # 215, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
        M5A 1N0.

        Thanks.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.